Meth in battle?

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Octotrooper
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Meth in battle?

Post by Octotrooper » 13 Dec 2019 19:56

I have seen many articles stating that the nazis used meth when blitzkreiging to be more energetic, is this true? Thanks in advance!

Peter89
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Re: Meth in battle?

Post by Peter89 » 13 Dec 2019 21:09

Yes it was in common use. It was called Pervitin, nicknamed Panzerschokolade or Hermann-Göring-Pillen.

https://www.wienerzeitung.at/nachrichte ... illen.html

You can also read about remarkable feats under meth overdose from Aimo Koivunen.
“And while I am talking to you, mothers and fathers, I give you one more assurance. I have said this before, but I shall say it again, and again and again. Your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars." - FDR, October 1940

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Maxschnauzer
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Re: Meth in battle?

Post by Maxschnauzer » 14 Dec 2019 12:28

From what I've read it was not "Officially" (wink) issued to the troops but was readily available and an essential part of the Landser's kit in order to keep up with the pace. Same for the Luftwaffe pilots and crews.
Cheers,
Max

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Re: Meth in battle?

Post by Knouterer » 15 Dec 2019 12:54

Pervitin was not normally issued with rations but by medical personnel, on a generous scale however. Until 1941 soldiers could also buy the stuff in pharmacies without prescription. Doctors warned about the serious side effects but it was used until the end of the war, especially by flying personnel.
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Maxschnauzer
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Re: Meth in battle?

Post by Maxschnauzer » 16 Dec 2019 09:04

Unsurprisingly, it has been documented that the Allies also widely used amphetamines in the form of Benzedrine (Bennies) in order to keep up with the pace and promote a more aggressive edge in combat, or to keep aircrew alert during long missions.https://www.livescience.com/65788-world ... mines.html
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Sheldrake
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Re: Meth in battle?

Post by Sheldrake » 16 Dec 2019 11:59

There are packets of Benzadrine on display in the Pegasus Bridge museum in Normandy

In my research on the Ropyal Artillery in Normandy I found two mentions of drug use. Benzadrine was issued to 3 RHA's Gunners for the "Battle of the Box" in the aftermath the Villers Bocage battle.

7 Medium Regiment carried out a trial of Benzadrine in an exercise in early 1944 - Ex Digin. The test ginuea-pigs were youmg officers and the trial demonstrated the limitations of pep pills. There were delays in the exercise and one battery commander was unable to go to sleep when there was a chance to rest, and when they needed officers to be active they were "down" not "up."

While a pep pill may have been useful for units that could be predicted to need a burst of sustained energy, such as paratroopers, raiders or bomber pilots,they weren't a lot of use to soldiers or sailors facing sustained and unpredictable demands on their bodies and minds.

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Gorque
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Re: Meth in battle?

Post by Gorque » 17 Dec 2019 04:43

Who Put The Benzedrine In Mrs. Murphys Ovaltine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2WJqnK3gAY

Seems to have been common knowledge.

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Re: Meth in battle?

Post by mezsat2 » 28 Jan 2020 09:24

Gorque wrote:
17 Dec 2019 04:43
Who Put The Benzedrine In Mrs. Murphys Ovaltine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2WJqnK3gAY

Seems to have been common knowledge.
Yes, it's quite common knowledge and highly effective in short bursts.

What is not expounded on to a great enough degree is the eventual "crash" encountered. If it continues
to be used regularly, the mind and body break down, rendering the combatant useless.

If he stops the drug, he will be useless for a period of time about as long as he was using. That is, until
the body can restore the depleted dopamine supply. So, I guess if the leadership deems an operation as
so critical they can afford to care for the incapacitated soldier later, then it may be worth the gamble.

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