1945 Lost German girl

Discussions on the role played by and situation of women in the Third Reich not covered in the other sections. Hosted by Vikki.
Gradus
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Location: Groningen, The Netherlands

Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by Gradus » 31 Jul 2022 19:02

I also found this text (at https://www.ar15.com/forums/general/Rev ... 5-2458859/?):

'The LGG was a member of a group of about ten Waffen-SS " Bhmen " wearing civilian clothes and desperately trying to reach the American lines. My great-uncle remembers that, when arriving at their level, the young woman burst in the middle of the road, making signs so that they stop, which they did. So she asked if they knew where were the Americans. He remembers perfectly her fascinating beauty in spite of the knocks she received in the face, her youth and desperate energy. Other men were set back and looked exhausted and discouraged, being afraid of encountering again partisans. My great-uncle and his friends advised them to wait for the main column coming from Prague as getting themselves involved to it. The fact is that Weiddinger orders were strict: only the military units belonging to 2. SS-Panzer-Division were concerned by the protocol of surrender. The motorcyclists gave to the group of fugitives their last rations and restarted in the direction of Rokycany.'

wirklich
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Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by wirklich » 31 Jul 2022 19:29

Gradus wrote:
31 Jul 2022 18:03
Has anyone ever checked this: https://www.ww2.dk/Airfields%20-%20Czechoslovakia.pdf ? It's got all the operational Luftwaffe units listed as well plus the years they were active there. There's been a discussion before about the pants but those are indeed female Luftwaffe pants. There is a Pinterest account with Flak Helferinnen as well: https://www.pinterest.com/AlliesAxisWom ... lferinnen/ .
And excuses for when I post something that has been posted already..
It does not matter if you repost something. You may find something new.
post # 2433 gives some detail about what she was wearing.
From about post # 2420 forward you may find interesting.

wirklich
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Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by wirklich » 31 Jul 2022 19:35

Interest really took off when all the known film footage was released and uploaded to the internet.
For some unknown reason Thames did not use all of it in The World At War.
That was when she really stood out.

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CarlosXander
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Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by CarlosXander » 05 Aug 2022 22:54

hello forum
I recently came across a book that is in digital format entitled "German Women's Life Writing and the Holocaust
Complicity and Gender in the Second World War" in one of its chapters makes a summary of the story of Lore Vogt from the book "Zur Problematik von Soldatinnen.." by Jutta Rüdiger among its paragraphs I found a description that she (Lore Vogt) at Being in an SS vehicle is treated as an SS, it also describes that the US soldiers treated as SS the women who traveled in the SS vehicles, who dressed in men's clothes and obviously those who had the tattoo in her right armpit the blood group, in this story you can presume why LGG was called SS Girl by Captain Oren W. Haglund it will be because of her clothing or when she is accompanied by other members of the SS or perhaps she will carry that tattoo
I leave the paragraph where she appears and the address of the book so that they can read and discuss it
Cheers
Image

Image

digital book link
https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/ge ... DBDCC0D718

Gradus
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Location: Groningen, The Netherlands

Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by Gradus » 06 Aug 2022 12:22

As far I can tell it was concluded (based on vague pics) that LGG did not look like Lore Vogt on those pics and it was not here.. But the paragraph could very well describe something that did happen to her..

Then the 8 dead SS soldiers; in the Fischer report (https://dspace5.zcu.cz/bitstream/11025/ ... ischer.pdf, page 146) the following is mentioned: 'However, German soldiers mostly surrendered without a fight,
knowing that they were going to milder American prison camps. In large
numbers, they fled to West Bohemia, in the direction from Prague, running
away from the advancing Red Army. Yet some of them wanted to escape from
captivity, perhaps to try to get home or at least to Germany on their own. But
Americans were uncompromising in case of an attempted escape and fired at
fleeing captives. This happened, for example, when 2,000 prisoners of war
were brought to the Pilsen barracks (which served as lodgings for captives
until POW camps were built near the city). When passing through Ejpovice,
eight Germans attempted to escape, but the American guards shot and killed
all of them.'

From what I read there this happened in the village of Ejpovice, not in the fields where LGG was walking. So the footage of the battered German soldiers in the fields must have be something else. The dead boy at the bridge however could have been one of the 8 dead SS 'soldiers' (can't call a young boy like that a soldier really.

Then there is a book called 'Die Flakhelfer: Wie aus Hitlers jüngsten Parteimitgliedern Deutschlands führende Demokraten wurden' written by Malte Herwig. In the book description is mentioned 'Malte Herwig hat die 1945 auf abenteuerliche Weise gerettete Mitgliederkartei der Nazi-Partei gründlich gesichtet und ist auf viele bekannte Namen gestoßen.'. So Malte Herwig had access to a list with all the members of the NSDAP from 1933 through 1945. (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_von ... edsnummern). Now if LGG was indeed a Flak Helferin then she was most likely drafted from the Bund Deutscher Mädel (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bund_Deutscher_M%C3%A4del). There are over 10 million entries in the NSDAP list and I figure the members of the Bund Deutscher Mädel could be in there too. I am not sure how detailed this list is though. Will try to see if I can find any contact details for Malte Herwig.

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CarlosXander
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Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by CarlosXander » 06 Aug 2022 21:41

hello
I think that the book “Na demarkační čáře, Americká armáda v Čechách v friction 1945” where it tells of these events generalizes the facts since they went from the curve on highway 605 to the bridge where the town of Ejpovice ends, it is likely that LGG was attacked in that curve or at the end of it where most of the people beaten on the side of that road can be seen, it also names garden 89 or plot 89 which is precisely where LGG is apparently filmed sitting with other men and that sector is where Lore Vogt and her companions arrived on May 9
Cheers

Spavy
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Joined: 07 Aug 2022 23:56
Location: Italy

Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by Spavy » 08 Aug 2022 00:20

Hi, I'm Italian and thanks to this forum I got interested in the story of the LLG. I found a written testimony from Anna Spieckermans, one of these Flakwaffenhelferinnen who was assigned to the Pilsen area between 1944 and 1945.
At these link you can read some pages and download them in PDF:

https://www.proquest.com/docview/1300490552

ignacioosacar1
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Location: buenos aires

Re: 1945 Lost German girl

Post by ignacioosacar1 » 11 Aug 2022 15:40

Ciao Spavy,

Welcome to the forum. Yours is a good contribution to the "Flakhelferinen" theory. I must say that in my oppinion, it is a very probable one.

Cheers

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