Pregnancy while in service?

Discussions on the role played by and situation of women in the Third Reich not covered in the other sections. Hosted by Vikki.
User avatar
Dan Mouritzsen
Member
Posts: 371
Joined: 19 May 2003 13:36
Location: Denmark

Pregnancy while in service?

Post by Dan Mouritzsen » 01 Jul 2018 00:11

Hi

Is there anything in writing about how the Wehrmacht officially looked at pregnancy while in the service? For an example, what happened if a Nachrichtenhelferin got pregnant, either with a colleague, or become pregnant after a leave at home?

Dan

Travelswithhermes
Member
Posts: 17
Joined: 23 May 2018 20:59
Location: Southeastern US

Re: Pregnancy while in service?

Post by Travelswithhermes » 01 Jul 2018 06:48

I'd be interested to learn more about this too! My wife and I were discussing it recently.

eidechse
Member
Posts: 9
Joined: 23 Apr 2006 21:29
Location: niederlande

Re: Pregnancy while in service?

Post by eidechse » 18 Oct 2018 17:29

No replies so it looks like the usual solution is there ,she can keep the child and maybe get 5 RM.

User avatar
Hoover
Member
Posts: 302
Joined: 20 Sep 2005 08:52
Location: Verden/Germany

Re: Pregnancy while in service?

Post by Hoover » 20 Oct 2018 10:24

I don´t know the way of handling a pregnancy, but if the father is German (euther soldier or civilian) I am quite sure that it would not give any problems. If the father was a foreigner, POW etc the woman woulf be in big trouble.

Lovise
Member
Posts: 7
Joined: 19 Jun 2019 16:27
Location: Berlin

Re: Pregnancy while in service?

Post by Lovise » 05 Jul 2019 11:34

Dan Mouritzsen wrote:
01 Jul 2018 00:11
Hi

Is there anything in writing about how the Wehrmacht officially looked at pregnancy while in the service? For an example, what happened if a Nachrichtenhelferin got pregnant, either with a colleague, or become pregnant after a leave at home?

Dan
Pregnancy prevented service, so I would assume that it would end it, too.

My grandmother had been drafted into the Organisation Todt in 1943. Since she had no intention of helping those people, she told the lady at the office where she had to report, that her husband was coming home on leave, soon and that they wanted to try for a baby. German babies were always first priority, so she got a deferral until a few months after my grandfather was due to come on leave. Lo and behold, my mother was born nine months later.

I know several stories of acquaintances and family friends who got their service letters and managed to escape it through pregnancy.

If pregnancy occurred while in service, I would think the women would have had the same option as women not in service - have the baby on her own, possibly getting married, if the father was willing and available, or have the child in a Lebensborn facility to possibly give them up for adoption.

Return to “Women in the Reich”