Soviet Railways

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Der Alte Fritz
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Re: Soviet Railways

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 13 Mar 2018 10:44

I think that the 12th March 1943 GKO decision is this one:
GKO-3029 converting captured wagons to broad gauge.pdf
The 36,000 wagons represent around 5% of the fleet at that date, perhaps a little more. Wagon loadings for the Germans in Spring 1943 ran at 13,000 a day with a turnaround of 7 days which would indicate a minimum fleet of 91,000 so the loss of 36,000 wagons in the short term would be quite a loss, however there was always a large stock sitting around in sidings especially in industrial centres like Kharkov so you might be looking at around 20% of the entire fleet.
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Der Alte Fritz
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Re: Soviet Railways

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 23 Mar 2018 10:17

Calculation of military formations, units, services, departments and institutions 1 Tank Army for transportation by rail, remaining after road transport and without the presence of caterpillar vehicles
https://pamyat-naroda.ru/documents/view/?id=112676833

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Der Alte Fritz
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Re: Soviet Railways

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 31 Oct 2019 18:22

History of the VOSO service of the Russian Army
http://voso.zazhgu.ru/index.php/topic,176.0.html#forum

The text of the 2-volume anniversary textbook from 2008 which replaces the standard text book of 1952 История службы военных сообщений и железнодорожных войск Советской армии: учебное пособие/Под ред. Г.Н. Караева. Ч. 1. Л.: ВТА им. Л.М. Кагановича, 1952. С. 13
[The history of the service of military communications and railway troops of the Soviet army: textbook / Ed. G.N. Karaeva. Part 1. L.: Military Transport Academy (BTA) L.M. Kaganovich, 1952.P. 13]

INTRODUCTION

The textbook offered to the attention of readers is dedicated to the anniversary — the 90th anniversary of the formation of the Central Directorate of Military Communications of the Red Army (1918), which determined the modern structure of the military communications service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.
However, in the Russian, Soviet and Red armies, military communications bodies had a centuries-old foundation of knowledge, skills and traditions accumulated in the campaigns of the ancient Slavs, developed by medieval Russia, systematized by the Russian army in the Petrine era and continuously developing to this day.
The art of war is the art of maneuver. And it was the perfection of military communications that made it possible to deliver devastating blows to the enemy in unexpected directions for him, to decide the course of campaigns and wars in his favor. At the same time, the shortcomings of military communications fatally affected the combat effectiveness of the army, and in many respects caused serious defeats.
They say that generals always prepare for past wars, bearing in mind the continuous development of military art, the birth of new forms and methods of armed struggle. However, this birth does not occur from scratch. Therefore, it is also known that one who does not have a past does not have a future either.
Thus, in this edition, the systematic plan summarizes the experience of developing communication lines and means of transport of our country, the practice of using them in the interests of the Armed Forces, provides historical examples of both successfully and unsuccessfully organized military communications, shows the stages of the formation of the EUMA service and the procedure for managing it .
The relevance of the book is determined, of course, not only by the anniversary mentioned - the previous analogue, a two-volume manual “The History of the Service of Military Communications and Railway Troops of the Soviet Army”, was published in the Military Transport Academy named after L. M. Kaganovich back in 1952–1953. and became a bibliographic rarity, and subsequent special monographs, in many respects having the form of collections of memoirs, about 40–20 years ago. The team of authors tried to preserve the structure and orientation of the previous manual, if possible to refine its content both “in depth” and supplementing it with an analysis of events that have occurred over the past 50 years, of course, without claiming to be complete.

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