Soviet mess tins

Discussions on all aspects of the USSR, from the Russian Civil War till the end of the Great Patriotic War and the war against Japan. Hosted by Art.
User avatar
Der Alte Fritz
Member
Posts: 2009
Joined: 13 Dec 2007 21:43
Location: Kent United Kingdom

Soviet mess tins

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 15 Aug 2019 19:15

Anyone got pictures of the Aluminium mess tins and the glass alternative. What was it called in Russian

Art
Forum Staff
Posts: 5410
Joined: 04 Jun 2004 19:49
Location: Moscow, Russia

Re: Soviet mess tins

Post by Art » 16 Aug 2019 07:34


User avatar
Der Alte Fritz
Member
Posts: 2009
Joined: 13 Dec 2007 21:43
Location: Kent United Kingdom

Re: Soviet mess tins

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 16 Aug 2019 09:06

Soviet mess tin.jpg
RKKA equipment.jpg
which I think is called "котелок" which roughly translates as "cauldron" but this may relate to the larger generic pots with a handle that were used for cooking over a fire.

I am currently reading "Hunger and War - Food provisioning in the Soviet Union during World War II" by Goldman and Fittzer and they mention the use of replacement glass mess tins due to the shortage of aluminium for making the ones above.

4,000,000 ones were ordered in third quarter 1942 and 5,000,000 in third quarter of 1943

reference Тyl Krasnoi Armii v Velikoi Otechestvennoi voine 1941-45 p.137

alternative design of mess tin?
mess tine alternative design.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

GregSingh
Member
Posts: 2800
Joined: 21 Jun 2012 01:11
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Soviet mess tins

Post by GregSingh » 16 Aug 2019 10:40

replacement glass mess tins due to the shortage of aluminium
I don't think this is correct.
Instead of aluminum these tins were made of steel and they were only covered outside by hardened liquid glass solution.

Only water bottles / jars (фляги) were entirely made of glass instead of aluminum.
If we become increasingly humble about how little we know, we may be more eager to search.

User avatar
Der Alte Fritz
Member
Posts: 2009
Joined: 13 Dec 2007 21:43
Location: Kent United Kingdom

Re: Soviet mess tins

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 16 Aug 2019 12:35

On of the references (Russian Archive) quoted, says this:
8. Котелок более удобный бобовидный и особенно удобная крышка для питья чая и взятия второго блюда, но окраска быстро слазит**, особенно при варке в нем пищи.
9. Фляга сама по себе удобная, но стеклянные сильно бьются, а алюминиевых недостаточно и дорого обходится ее изготовление. Я бы считал, что флягу можно выпускать из пластмассы.
8. The mess-tin is a more convenient bean-shaped and especially convenient lid for drinking tea and taking a second dish, but the color quickly peels off **, especially when cooking food in it.
9. The water-bottle itself is comfortable, but the glass is hard to break, and aluminum is not enough and its manufacture is expensive. I would think that a flask can be made out of plastic.
which is not terribly enlightening. I shall have to get the other reference.

Seppo Koivisto
Member
Posts: 609
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 22:49
Location: Finland

Re: Soviet mess tins

Post by Seppo Koivisto » 16 Aug 2019 14:20

Glass in mess tins sounds like enamel.

User avatar
Der Alte Fritz
Member
Posts: 2009
Joined: 13 Dec 2007 21:43
Location: Kent United Kingdom

Re: Soviet mess tins

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 16 Aug 2019 17:49

"Hygiene" Vol 33 of "Experience of Soviet medicine in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945" p92 (available on Twirpx https://t.co/vt63owuJOC?amp=1) says:
12. Disinfectants for individual water supplies
During the Great Patriotic War, the troops had two types of flasks: glass and aluminum. Glass jars turned out to be matrimonial for a combat situation: they quite easily break on the march, and especially during dashes, during the attack. When filling
jars of hot tea, the glass does not withstand the effects of high temperature and gives cracks; freezing water in a flask in winter leads to the same. During the war, all front-line and army sanitary inspectors unanimously demanded the replacement of glass jars with metal, mainly aluminum, which withstand high and low temperatures well, do not beat on the march and during dashes, and are almost three times lighter than glass ones.
So in the book it says "glass canteens" but my translation of the original shows that the references are all for "glass water bottles"

Return to “The Soviet Union at War 1917-1945”