General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Discussions on all aspects of the USSR, from the Russian Civil War till the end of the Great Patriotic War and the war against Japan. Hosted by Art.
Dann Falk
Member
Posts: 573
Joined: 02 Mar 2009 18:34
Location: California - USA

General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by Dann Falk » 18 Mar 2023 16:54

Greetings to all researchers.

The paragraph below is from Chuikov's book "In the Battles for Ukraine." He talks about leaving his 8th Guards Army and going to a hospital in Moscow for almost a month. Can anyone provide information about what he needed treatment for? I have been unable to find anything about his ailment.

"At the insistence of the commander of the front, R. Y. Malinovsky, and the representative of the Supreme Command Headquarters, A. M. Vasilevsky, on October 15, I left for Moscow for treatment in a hospital. Colonel-General I. I. Maslennikov took temporary command of the 8th Guards Army. I returned from the hospital immediately after the November holidays, and on November 12, I re-took command of the army."

Thanks for any help.

Dann Falk

User avatar
taurus
Member
Posts: 151
Joined: 20 May 2016 14:52
Location: RF

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by taurus » 21 Mar 2023 05:12

General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?
Hi,
I suppose you were mistaken in the date. It should be clarified that 1943 should be indicated.
Best regards

User avatar
taurus
Member
Posts: 151
Joined: 20 May 2016 14:52
Location: RF

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by taurus » 21 Mar 2023 05:45

Once in 1943, Chuikov, along with officers, inspected the front line. It was in the fall, in a risk, road signs there, of course, did not stand, in general, ours fell into a neutral strip, barely reached their own, to some kind of hut. At this time, panic was already spread that the general was gone. And Chuikov was forced to give a radiogram about the place of stay. The message was intercepted, and massive fire spilled onto the hut. Vasily Ivanovich simply went out, stood up to the wall and did not move.
When the German planes flew away, he turned around and saw that the wall was all in the holes, and it was not a scratch on it. He wanted to cross himself, but his fingers were convulsed, and he crossed himself with his fist.
https://aut-aut.ru/data/marshal-chujkov ... x639979467

It clarifies that a bomb hit was carried out at the house in which he was with several offices. And the fact that he was not injured.
But apparently, Malinovsky had some reason to send him to the hospital. Or he did it just in case to make sure that everything was in order with him.

General Maslennikov, as a commander of the 8th Guards Army, signs the first documents on 10/21/1943.
Best regards

Dann Falk
Member
Posts: 573
Joined: 02 Mar 2009 18:34
Location: California - USA

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by Dann Falk » 24 Mar 2023 00:13

Thanks Taurus,

Your idea might be it.

The date from his book was 1943.

I was thinking Chuikov was suffering from Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) at Stalingrad, and it might have begun to bother him again.

Let me know if something else could have happened.

Dann

Dann Falk
Member
Posts: 573
Joined: 02 Mar 2009 18:34
Location: California - USA

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by Dann Falk » 24 Mar 2023 22:41

A bit more info.

In July 1944, a reporter from the Red Star newspaper stated.

"V. S. Grossman repeatedly visited V. I. Chuikov, commander of the 8th Guards Army. From Stalingrad he wrote about him in the Red Star. I saw Vasily Ivanovich for the first time. He was dressed in a field uniform. It is built tightly; the voice is confident. Both hands are bandaged for some reason. Injured? It seems awkward to ask..."

Having both hands bandaged, leads me to think Chuikov had severe Eczema, and that is why he went to Moscow in 1943.

User avatar
taurus
Member
Posts: 151
Joined: 20 May 2016 14:52
Location: RF

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by taurus » 25 Mar 2023 06:06

Hi Dann,
I also previously read about this in another source, but I did not think that this could be the reason for sending it to the hospital.
Chuikova by the way called "white gloves."

"....А за белые перчатки у него и вовсе принимали бинты на руках. Дело в том, что во время Сталинградской битвы у генерала от нервного перенапряжения началась сильнейшая экзема, и он нуждался в ежедневных перевязках".
Best regards

Dann Falk
Member
Posts: 573
Joined: 02 Mar 2009 18:34
Location: California - USA

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by Dann Falk » 25 Mar 2023 16:22

taurus wrote:
25 Mar 2023 06:06
Hi Dann,
I also previously read about this in another source, but I did not think that this could be the reason for sending it to the hospital.
Chuikova by the way called "white gloves."

"....А за белые перчатки у него и вовсе принимали бинты на руках. Дело в том, что во время Сталинградской битвы у генерала от нервного перенапряжения началась сильнейшая экзема, и он нуждался в ежедневных перевязках".
Much Thanks Taurus!

He it is in English.
"And for white gloves, they completely took bandages on his hands. The fact is that during the Battle of Stalingrad, the general developed severe eczema from nervous overstrain, and he needed daily dressings."

I had eczema when I was younger, pain and itching. I wanted to rip my skin off, so I can understand Chuikov having both hands covered.

Good research on your part.

Thanks again.
Dann

User avatar
taurus
Member
Posts: 151
Joined: 20 May 2016 14:52
Location: RF

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by taurus » 30 Mar 2023 08:41

I was glad to help you. Judging by the post -war photo, this ailment probably left Chuikov. But in military photos it is very noticeable.

Image
Best regards

Dann Falk
Member
Posts: 573
Joined: 02 Mar 2009 18:34
Location: California - USA

Re: General V.I. Chuikov Hospital Stay in 1944?

Post by Dann Falk » 30 Mar 2023 16:29

Great New Photo to me!

Thanks again for your help.

Dann

Return to “The Soviet Union at War 1917-1945”