russian body armor

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Daniel L
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russian body armor

Post by Daniel L » 24 Sep 2002 20:55

I remember that I've seen some pictures (not photos!) of russian assault troops in body armor. Was there any in existence?

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Oleg Grigoryev
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re

Post by Oleg Grigoryev » 24 Sep 2002 23:50

Image

Image

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 25 Sep 2002 08:13

Yes, that's exactly those I've seen. Thanks! Can you tell me anything more about them? Which units used them, how common etc.

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Oleg Grigoryev
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Post by Oleg Grigoryev » 25 Sep 2002 18:42

These were issued to assult engineers units. Most sources say that they were maid out of steel one magazine however claimed that they were maid out of titanium. This body armor was effective against 9x19mm cartridge as well as grenade and other small fragments. “Panzerniks” (nickname for these soldiers) were specially selected crack troops (many former sportsmen, hand to hand combat professionals, cliffhangers etc) specifically trained for assault on fortified positions and urban warfare.

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 25 Sep 2002 18:51

Thanks for the reply. When did this armor first see action? Was it common?

regards

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Oleg Grigoryev
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Post by Oleg Grigoryev » 25 Sep 2002 19:04

It was issued prior to the war – 1939 I believe it was. Consequently it was first used during the war between USSR and Finland. It was extensively used staring with a siege of Stalingrad whenever heavily fortified areas had to be assaulted

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Antti V
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Post by Antti V » 25 Sep 2002 19:07

How heavy it was? It surely wan´t any light stuff to carry with all other equipments (arms, helmet etc.)

Does you have any extra info which units did use that in Winter War? I have never heard, from the stories of veterans, that they did meet enemies equipped with this 'bullet vest'.

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Juha Hujanen
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Post by Juha Hujanen » 26 Sep 2002 17:51

Here's a photo of captured Russian body armour.It was captured in karelian isthmus during Winter War and is on Finnish soldier only for the photo,
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Roberto
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Post by Roberto » 30 Sep 2002 20:50

Assault groups.

The Red Army formed and widely used special storm troops for storming and destroying the fortified defense in the second half of the war. In the last phase, meeting the strong prepared defense lines, after horrors and losses of fighting in the cities, the Red Army widely employed these units as an integer part of the front line troops and storm armies. They played an important role in the fight within cities. For example, 104 assault groups and 26 assault units were engaged in the siege of Koenigsberg.

Typical assault group consisted of infantry platoon with 2-3 tanks and 2 field guns (76 mm or 122 mm) for the fire support, a company of miners, a company of flame-throwers and 2 AT guns. The assault unit included a battalion of infantry, 10 tanks, battery of 120mm mortars, battery of field guns and a couple of heavy guns, platoon of miners and platoon of flame throwers, i.e. a few storm groups. Often the infantrymen in assault groups were equipped with bulletproof metal vests. Some sources said that the fight with the Soviet heavy infantry had the demoralizing effect on the Germans as they appeared to be not affected by the fire.

Both assault groups and units should not be mixed with storm armies, which was formed on the other principle. Assault groups operated in three operational parts: assault part, fire support and reserve. The groups were tasked with destroying the enemy's fortifications, hence the inclusion of all necessary means for the purpose. The main attacking element of these groups and units in the cities were flame-throwers because the flame could penetrate the places and corners no other weapon could. There are numerous indications that the flame-throwers were used widely and to the great effect, especially so in the cities. The stream of fire were devastating the enemy's positions in the buildings and cellars.

However, special units equipped with flame-throwers existed already in the beginning of the war. The tank and the flame-thrower were married also long ago and T-26's with the flame-throwers were used in the Finnish/Winter war. A bit later flame -throwers were installed on BT-7, T-34 and KV (KV- 8 ) and T-34.

The infantry had their own pack flame-throwers and special mine like charges could be used as well to detain the advancing troops.

With the developing of the operational art the flame-throwing tanks were united in independent units and used to add a punch to the storm armies. Typically, these units, Independent regiments or battalions, were used together with the standard tanks and batteries of SP guns. With the advance operation in progress, the flame-throwing tanks were used for a while as normal tanks before the unit was put in reserve.

With KV's gradually dropping out of the circulation, T-34's became the main platform for carrying flame-throwers. The equipment was installed instead of the hull machine-gun with only external difference in the MG mask.

The tanks with the flame-throwers were collected into the independent tank regiments, which accompanied assault groups in the advance operations.


Source of quote:

http://pkka.narod.ru/flame1.htm

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SerbTiger
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Post by SerbTiger » 01 Oct 2002 09:43

Roberto,
Thanks for the info.

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Antti V
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Post by Antti V » 01 Oct 2002 09:45

Thanks Juha, it seems to be so that you do learn something new every day 8)

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 01 Oct 2002 15:50

interesting read!

regards

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