Sultan Mehmet V's visit to Kosovo June 1911

Discussions on the final era of the Ottoman Empire, from the Young Turk Revolution of 1908 until the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923.
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Peter H
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Sultan Mehmet V's visit to Kosovo June 1911

Post by Peter H » 07 Jul 2007 12:16

http://www.let.leidenuniv.nl/tcimo/tulp ... /CIEPO.htm
I think we can say that Sultan Reshat's Macedonian journey served four distinct - but interconnected - political purposes: In the first place it was meant to cement ties with the Albanian Muslim population, which was regarded by the C.U.P. as a crucial factor in retaining its hold over the area....The second, more general political aim was to strengthen the policy of ttihad-i Anasr (Unity of the Elements or "Ottomanism") by the organization of demonstrations of inter-ethnic solidarity in the most ethnically mixed area of the empire....Thirdly, the journey served to strengthen the political position of the Committee of Union and Progress, which had been losing public support and political power over the past year, through the close and very visible association of the Sultan with leading committee members....Fourthly, the visit, and in particular the ceremonies on the battlefield of Kosovopolje, served the more general purpose of strengthening Ottoman (and more specifically Ottoman-Muslim) national consciousness through reference to historically significant symbols.

bob lembke
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Kosovo Polje

Post by bob lembke » 07 Jul 2007 17:37

Let me post a parallel question; anyone interested in or knowledgable about the question that Peter posted might have an answer.

I have visited the battlefield of Kosovo Polje, in 1971. Does anyone know what happened to the turbe on the battlefield, the chapel to the intestines of the Turkish Sultan who was victorious on the battlefield, and who was asassinated on the evening of the battle by a Serbian captain. My fear is that in the last 10-15 years Serbian hot-heads have blown up this lovely little chapel.

Aas to Peter's question, I have no information, aside from the observation that Albanians fought alongside the Serbs at Kosovo Polje, but that after the defeat they "smelled the coffee" and often cooperated with the new Turkish rulers, leading to centuries of tension between the Albanians nd the Serbs.

Bob Lembke

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System

Post by bob lembke » 07 Jul 2007 17:40

Another two posts failed, with an "Invalid Session" notice.

Bob

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 11 Jul 2007 13:40

Murad's Turbe

Image

http://www.kosovo.net/turbe.jpg

According to this UNESCO Report 2005 its still there:

http://portal.unesco.org/es/file_downlo ... tilled.pdf.

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Post by Peter H » 11 Jul 2007 13:45

Mary Edith Durham visits Kosovo,1909:

http://www.kosovo.net/durham3.html

bob lembke
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Turbe

Post by bob lembke » 11 Jul 2007 14:43

I am delighted that the Turbe is still there. I had assumed that the Serbs had blown it up. Some of my serb friends here boast of their doing such things, blowing up mosques at the first chance, and tell me that even the Muslims approve of it! Beograd had 300 mosques 150 years ago, today it has one, I believe. (Other serb friends strongly disapprove of such things. A am probably veering non-PC.)

Any rate, the narrative about wandering in Kosovo 100 years ago is interesting. I loved Bosnia 30 years ago and visited several times, Kosovo only once, briefly. I have been to some of the places she described. Not the harem, though.

Thanks for assuring me that the Turbe is safe. I had been worried for years.

The Turbe is not for the sultan's body, but for his entrails. They were removed and buried locally, like a deer, they would spoil the whole carcass. The body was preserved (salted?) and sent to Istanbul for burial. Have to run out, but I have an interesting story about this; a general died, a little turbe was built for his entrails, and his valet stayed to guard his turbe and keep it clean, and his family stayed for 16 generations. Finally, about 25 years ago, the new generation said: "What, hang about a little tomb all my life and sweep and shoo away the pidgons (sp?) ? Never, I'm off to the university!" . I would imagine that the local Vakuf would supply a small stipend.

Bob Lembke

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Post by Tosun Saral » 17 Jul 2007 09:18

Sultan Mehmet Reşat visited on June 15th 1911Tomb of Sultan I. Murat during his travels in Rumelia. He saw that the tomb was ruining. He ordered to repair the tomb. He wrote the the following verse on the keystone of the new tomb:
"Pek harap olmus isi bu turbe-i sah Murad
Emr-u ferman eyledi tamirine Sultan Resat
Bir zafer tarihini yad ettiren bu millete
Ruh-i pak sad eden o sah- ali himmete
Arz edup bu cevher-i tarihi (ta'zim eyleriz)
Meshedin ihyasına (şevket) saadet belleriz"

"The tomb of Shah Murad was already ruined
Sultan Reşat gave the imperial order to restore the tomb
Which is a rememberence to all the nation of a victorious day.
for Him( Sultan Murad) who reigned in good souls
We gave you a notice on a precious history.
We are very pleased to restore his tomb"

source my book: Ismail Tosun Saral-Emre Saral " Macarlar ve Tuna Hakkında Yazılan Şiirler 1300-2000) (Poems about Hungarians by Turks 1300-2000) p. 27

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