The Youngest Soldier in Gallipoli

Discussions on the final era of the Ottoman Empire, from the Young Turk Revolution of 1908 until the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923.
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seljuk
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The Youngest Soldier in Gallipoli

Post by seljuk » 02 Feb 2006 13:48

Private James Martin.
he just 14 years old.
how the goverment give permission this guy to came gallipoli?
http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-her ... -anzac.htm

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Mehmet Fatih
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Post by Mehmet Fatih » 02 Feb 2006 18:32

The youngest Turkish soldier to fight in Gallipoli was a private called Ahmet from Canakkale. He was 15 years old when he was killed in action.
He stole his elder brother's documents when his brother came home for a few days of resting. The NCO wanted to send him back when he arrived at the front. He told the NCO that his brother would be away for a few days and he would subtitutes his brother's place. The NCO still wanted him to go. But Ahmet cried and NCO let him stay. Ahmet was killed in action a few days later he arrived at the front.
I took a picture of his tombstone during my last visit to Gallipoli. I will send it if I can scan it.

Regards
Fatih
Last edited by Mehmet Fatih on 03 Feb 2006 03:23, edited 1 time in total.

alf
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Post by alf » 03 Feb 2006 03:03

how the goverment give permission this guy to came gallipoli?
THe Government didn't give him permission, he lied about his age when joining up. Tens of thousands of young men rushed to join up in 1914, he slipped through in the throng.

The youngest at Gallipoli through were probably the Royal Navy midshipmen who commanded the boats fore the landing . Some of those were literally children as the joining age was between 12-14.

regards

alf
[/quote]

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 03 Feb 2006 14:35

As I recall parental permission was required for AIF recruits under 20 years old in 1914/15.

This was just as easy to forge.

British volunteers meanwhile didn't even require proof of age(a birth cerificate etc) until conscription was brought in,in 1916.

Of interest:

http://www.irishseamensrelativesassocia ... ldiers.htm
...we reveal how at least a quarter of a million under age boys fought for Britain between 1914 and 1918. Some were as young as 14 or 15. Around 120,000 were killed or wounded.

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 03 Feb 2006 14:42

16 year old Lt Reginald Battersby commanded a British platoon at the Somme:

http://www.pals.org.uk/battersby.htm

Tosun Saral
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Post by Tosun Saral » 26 Feb 2006 20:00

A 10 years old Sultan Son Sehzade/Prince Serif Efendi was send to Gallipoli war trenches and fired to the enemy from 15 step distance.
Source: "Harb mecmuasi(The War Magazine) Nr.2, p.24
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Temren
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Post by Temren » 30 Mar 2006 04:53

Turkish boys, collected photos
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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 30 Mar 2006 06:47

Turkish boy scouts also received paramilitary training?

Image
http://www.greatwardifferent.com/Great_ ... %20008.jpg

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Post by Tosun Saral » 02 Apr 2006 12:47

Dear Temren, I think you sended a wrong picture for an examble young ones who fought at Gallipoli, although it is written "Osmanli Gencler Cemiyeti"(Ottoman Youth Society) on the photocart. It is wrong because the caps (başlık) that they wear are from 1922,23.24 and worn by the soldiers of Mustafa Kemal's Nationalist Ankara Government. As an example I enclose my fathers photo as a leutnant of Mustafa Kemal's Ankara Government from the year 1924.
http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/tt/62cad/#TL
Therefore they are not young soldiers who fought at Gallipoli.

Temren
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Post by Temren » 04 Apr 2006 02:31

Dear Tosun Saral, you can be right though. I have noticed "1915" on the photo, but it can be wrong. The source is just an another Turkish Forum(Nihal Atsýz, tasvip etmesem de)..

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Mehmet Fatih
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Post by Mehmet Fatih » 05 Apr 2006 00:45

This photos were used by Gallipoli Martyrs Research Society (Canakkale Sehitleri Tanýtým ve Arastýrma Dernegi), labelled as the Ottoman Youth Society boys who fought in Gallipoli.
I doubt if they can make a big mistake like that.

Does anyone of our Turkish members have info about the uniforms worn by the Ottoman Youth Society?

Best Regards
Fatih

Tosun Saral
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Post by Tosun Saral » 05 Apr 2006 16:15

Dear Mehmet Fatih,
I am sorry but they made a big mistake. If you look at the pictures attentive and cerefully you will see one boy having a "Kalpak" (a astragan head wear worn by Mustafa Kemal's National Forces) During Ottoman period in WW1 Turks never had such a head wear. For the other boys caps I gave a picture of my late father for a clear decision.
The information is wrong. Because no body in Turkey is interested with uniforms, signs, madals. You can find many mistakes in Turkish TV series, movies concerning War of Independance, WW1 or Ottoman wars, uniforms, madals e.c.t.. Those mistakes make my eyes realy sad.

On the other hand the organization of Boy Scouts have a very old tradition in Turkey. Just after Lord Baden-Powell Bro:. established the organization according to Scotish Rite and British Free and Accepted Masonic Traditions (e.g. Rotarians have their Rotracks) Turkish Free Masons also established the Boy Scout Organization in Turkey. During the Ottoman Period they were called "Keşşaf" which means scout. But after the declaration of Turkish Republic Organizations of Girl Scouts and Young Wolfs were also established. Until 1938 the name Keşşaf was commen after that time we call the scouts "izci" Until 1965 I was also a Boy Scout.
Cheers.
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Mehmet Fatih
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Post by Mehmet Fatih » 06 Apr 2006 00:34

Tosun Saral wrote:Dear Mehmet Fatih,
I am sorry but they made a big mistake. If you look at the pictures attentive and cerefully you will see one boy having a "Kalpak" (a astragan head wear worn by Mustafa Kemal's National Forces) During Ottoman period in WW1 Turks never had such a head wear. For the other boys caps I gave a picture of my late father for a clear decision.
The information is wrong. Because no body in Turkey is interested with uniforms, signs, madals. You can find many mistakes in Turkish TV series, movies concerning War of Independance, WW1 or Ottoman wars, uniforms, madals e.c.t.. Those mistakes make my eyes realy sad.
Thanks for the info Mr. Saral.
That's a really big mistake. And you are right about those TV series concerning old Turkish Wars. They make my eyes bleed.
I was also a Boy Scout.
Me too!! 8-)

Best Regards
Fatih

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Post by Tosun Saral » 29 Apr 2006 18:48

An unknown Turkish child Artillary NCO during Gallipoli battles im 1915.
source: Newspaper "Vataniki" April 25, 2006
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Mehmet Fatih
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Post by Mehmet Fatih » 05 May 2006 17:28

Tosun Saral wrote:An unknown Turkish child Artillary NCO during Gallipoli battles im 1915.
source: Newspaper "Vataniki" April 25, 2006
This soldier's name is Adil Sahin. He fought in Gallipoli and survived the war.
His story was told in "Gallipoli Revealed" of Savas Karakas.

Best Regards
Fatih

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