The official AHF Third Reich music quiz thread

Discussions on the music in the Third Reich. Hosted by Ivan Ž.
Maikowski
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Re: Question 94

Post by Maikowski » 29 Dec 2019 01:46

Auceps wrote:
28 Dec 2019 17:35
I guess it'd be 'Der Luftschutz auf der Wacht' by Werner Günther and Carl Echtermeier (another, more famous recording was made by Grammophon-Orchester in 1935 or so). :)
Congratulations Auceps ! You win ! :thumbsup:
I should say you both win since Ivan immediately recognized the song too and the choir of SA-Sturm 13/20 "Kurt Eckert" on my Gloria GO-13073 record... :D

It is your turn now, my dear Auceps !
Cheers
Maiko

Auceps
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Question 95

Post by Auceps » 01 Jan 2020 19:30

Thank you, Maiko! I agree, Ivan also gave a small hint with that. :wink:

My question would be as follows: Hans Baumann's song 'Es zittern die morschen Knochen' was also arranged by him [probably not by him, see my note below - Ivan Ž.] to another musical genre (which included the song in it too). What was the particular name of that genre?

Cheers,
Auceps

Maikowski
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Re: Question 95

Post by Maikowski » 10 Jan 2020 17:29

Hello Auceps !

Was it not a 'Marschfantasie' (über ein Kampflied) ?

Cheers
Maiko

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Ivan Ž.
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Re: Question 95

Post by Ivan Ž. » 11 Jan 2020 11:54

Sadly, a number of (January) posts were lost during the forum's migration to the new server, including my note regarding the Marschfantasie. So I'll try to write it again.

To my knowledge, there's only one period source that (seemingly) credited Baumann as an author of a march fantasy over his song "Es zittern die morschen Knochen": Telefunken A 2501. This record actually contains two march fantasies, over Götz & Flex's song "Wildgänse rauschen durch die Nacht" and over Baumann's "Es zittern die morschen Knochen". However: on the record labels, the Telefunken company credited (as usual) only the authors of the original songs, and not the authors of the new arrangements. There was even a version of the labels with no composers credited; instead, both tracks were mistakenly credited as folk songs. So, the Telefunken info can't be considered reliable/definite. Of course, Baumann still might have had composed such a piece, but, with the current info, there's no real reason to believe that he did.

What adds to my suspicion is the fact that, according to F. K. Prieberg's research, Alfred von Beckerath composed a march fantasy over this song, entitled "Es zittern die morschen Knochen, Marschfantasie über ein Kampflied von Hans Baumann". The very same title appears on the Telefunken label. Prieberg did also mention Baumann himself composing such a piece, but his source for this info was the same unreliable Telefunken record.

Anyhow, without a solid confirmation from a different period source, the author of the Telefunken march fantasy should be considered unknown. The decisive info on this matter might be found in the original Telefunken recording list. Unfortunately, I only have a short version of the list at the moment, with no track authors credited. So if anyone has a complete copy of the Telefunken recording list, with authors of "Wildgänse" (mx. 22895) and "Es zittern" (mx. 22896) credited (including, hopefully, the new arrangers), please let us know.

Cheers,
Ivan

Auceps
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Re: Question 95

Post by Auceps » 11 Jan 2020 22:34

Hello, Maiko and Ivan,

yes, Maiko is correct, I meant this. I've read your first post as well, Ivan, thank you for that information! I agree that often the authors of the original works were credited also as authors of the phantasies and other arrangements of their songs, so I admit that Beckerath could be the author of the phantasy (like Arthur Seidel and his phatansies over Richard Wagner). Especially since Beckerath composed further works for the symphonic wind orchestra (like "Sinfonie für Blasorchester"). My question, however, concerned merely the genre, less the author. So I guess it's Maiko's turn to post a question and thank you again, Ivan! :-)

Best,
Auceps

Maikowski
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Question 96

Post by Maikowski » 15 Jan 2020 15:09

Hello everyone !

This one should be quite easy : At the beginning of this video, which song is sung by the youths on their way to their fight ?

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Maiko


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Ivan Ž.
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Re: Question 96

Post by Ivan Ž. » 15 Jan 2020 15:45

It's the first time I see this video :) And the song is Schulten's "Weit laßt die Fahnen wehen".

Cheers,
Ivan

Maikowski
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Re: Question 96

Post by Maikowski » 15 Jan 2020 18:04

Hello Ivan,

Good answer ! And so fast ! :thumbsup:
It is your turn now.

Cheers
Maiko

P.S. I like that video too :D Some rarely seen material...

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Ivan Ž.
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Question 97

Post by Ivan Ž. » 16 Jan 2020 21:34

Alright - a new one! Guess the name of the song! :D


Auceps
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Re: Question 97

Post by Auceps » 17 Jan 2020 05:34

Hello, Ivan,

that must be 'Das Lied der Männer vom Westwallbau'.

Cheers,
Auceps

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Ivan Ž.
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Re: Question 97

Post by Ivan Ž. » 17 Jan 2020 10:48

:thumbsup: A recording from the film "Der Westwall".

Reminder: the song's original title was "Lied der Männer vom Westwall", see viewtopic.php?f=81&t=47014

Your turn!
Ivan

Auceps
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Question 98

Post by Auceps » 16 Feb 2020 19:36

Well, I guess it's finally time to ask another question here: Which additional noises were unintentionally recorded in the world's first stereo recording of the first movement of Beethoven's 5th Piano Concerto (also know as the 'Emperor' Concerto) made in the Third Reich?

Cheers,
Auceps

Maikowski
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Re: Question 98

Post by Maikowski » 16 Feb 2020 21:22

I believe it is the sound of bombs exploding as an air raid was in progress over Berlin at that particular moment...

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Maiko

Auceps
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Re: Question 98

Post by Auceps » 16 Feb 2020 23:45

From what I know, there are two versions, one is bombs, second is the shots of the German AA guns trying to hit those, who were trying to drop these bombs, so the Allied air forces. One can hear it in the recording (here from 16:43):
https://youtu.be/vm61UqRzFNg?t=1002
So you're correct and it's your turn! :-)

Cheers,
Auceps

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