78 rpm record reviews (military music)

Discussions on the music in the Third Reich. Hosted by Ivan Ž.
Schmeisser
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Re:

Post by Schmeisser » 07 Jun 2015 14:27

Ivan Ž. wrote:
Telefunken wrote:I'm drooling over those, I especially like that NS-Schallplatten-Industrie version.
Maybe you know someone who is selling a version of it somewhere, Ivan?
No, no, no, don't drool, it is absolutely horrible! I tried but I NEVER managed to listen to any recording by the Schalmeienkapelle "Horst Wessel" completely. I think 20 seconds of this demoralizing and depressing off-key noise is the maximum my ears can take. Maybe even less. I don't know anyone who sells it and I wouldn't recommend it to you, to anyone, not even to my worst enemy.
Ahaha! :D The same thing!

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Re:

Post by Ivan Ž. » 07 Jun 2015 15:53

Telefunken wrote: is this not an apolitical forum with a musical discussion area that is here specifically for that purpose?
Yes, it is indeed an apolitical forum - but who says the members and visitors are? It is all public, available to everyone, sane and insane. And while three persons might use the political material for an apolitical research, next 300 will use it for political propaganda. We already discussed this privately and I really don't have much time to repeat myself over and over, please understand that.
Telefunken wrote:It is just music
It is NOT just music. It has lyrics, it has a message - a brainwashing, seemingly constructive but in fact very much destructive message, which sticks to one's brain, wrapped in a nice, catchy melody, designed to be repeated in one's mind until the message is carried out. Remember the Sirens & Ulysses' crew? There are still nazis around, communists, Germans, Jews, Americans, Brits, everything is the same as in 1933, only the places/roles have been switched here and there, but nothing was extincted since then. And if we know what happened after people in Germany sang "Deutschland erwache - Juda den Tod", I don't think it would be a sane behavior to enable people (and not only in Germany - but in the entire world, which internet covers) to sing the same brainwashing paroles today again, in one big online karaoke party.

In theory, if it's all just music - then why are we discussing "SA marschiert" instead of the original, "Argonnerlied"? Most of workers' songs (NS/communist) were only covers of existing songs; workers obviously didn't have much imagination nor many composers among them during the "Struggle period". So if one is interested in the music itself, politics is surely not the place to search for it.
Telefunken wrote:it is only dangerous to those who decide to make it so
So is a knife - does that mean that we should put knives in everyone's hands and see what happens?
Telefunken wrote:I suppose the neo-nazi's have to ruin historical exploration for everyone, but I am only curious, I understand that letting them have material like that would be a bad day for everyone, but isn't there a point where we just have to stop letting them ruin things for us? I would appreciate a source via PM if that is at all possible, and that way it won't be online for them to find themselves, and I would not distribute it.
Please understand that all neonazis already wrote that same text to me and to other collectors (not accusing you of anything of course, but only letting you know such requests are being sent all the time). It is always the same: "I am not a nazi. Can you send me this song for my personal use". YouTube is now filled with public pro-nazi channels with such recordings for personal use. So - no more.

Cheers,
Ivan

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Alexander B.
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Re:

Post by Alexander B. » 08 Jun 2015 11:37

Oh my, I realize that you are very passionate about this topic, I apologize for upsetting you.
I did not believe that neo-nazi's were that big of an issue with this hobby, and even if it was I didn't know they caused that much of a problem as far as distribution of musical materials go. a 100:1 ratio as far as interest goes is not good news.

As far as music, I was using it as a general word, not in reference to just the melody. I think all different versions are interesting, that is why you have seen me ask a-lot about different versions of things I've already heard or things I already have, I enjoy the variety and differences between known materials, the different groups of lyricists and bands I also admit that I am very interested in the political music as a whole, even though I collect a broad assortment of different kinds of marches and musics. It is a largely unexplored and misunderstood cog of the nazi era propaganda machine, and a part of the history that has not lost all of its mystery elements, most other parts being turned over so many different times that everything possible is known about them. All I was trying to state is that having moments like hearing "Ein Volk- Ein Reich" or the version of "Wir sind Kameraden" I found for the first time are enjoyable, like reading a new book or discovering a new food. The topic of discussion is just different, and despite the nature of the subject I still find the experience rather enjoyable and just would like to have more of them. I do not think it is advisable to distribute everything publicly, and I respect your opinion on sharing with random people that make accounts just to ask, and it is of course, your choice if you'd like to share with me. But I do find it a little disheartening that I am beyond a shadow of a doubt as far as a culprit for both neo-nazi political feelings, or the distribution of controversial recordings to people of dubious intention. I've never shared materials given to me in confidence or even shared newly discovered materials with anyone but members of the forum that I trust, nor have I ever expressed a neo-nazi view on anything, because I don't have that view. I realize that insulting me is definitely not the intent, but I've been collecting for a few years now, and have put a-lot of effort into the hobby for the sake of the information, and have shown interest in much more than just political records. I realize a neo-nazi could harbor views in secret while collecting, but I don't feel that someone like that would really put so much effort or money into exploring the subject, and instead would ask for all the materials instead of purchasing a copy for themselves even when copies and information are available outside the forum. They also focus purely on one or a few versions of the same few songs over and over again, thats why things like "Sieg heil, Victoria" end up as gathering points for them. I've noticed that they usually are more concerned with stealing the music for profit or using it to further their goals as fast as possible for as cheap as possible. I really am interested in collecting the physical records and their information, and hope that intent comes across in my interest. once again, that is nothing personal against you, Ivan, I understand why things are done a certain way, I just don't agree with the idea that information is so tightly controlled that it is restricted to a singular person or singular group of collectors within the community, and once again, I understand that the restricting of information for those that are genuinely interested is not the intent of the great importance of keeping riffraff away, however that is the end result of the amount of caution put in place.

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Re:

Post by Ivan Ž. » 08 Jun 2015 15:20

Telefunken wrote:As far as music, I was using it as a general word, not in reference to just the melody

Now think: if sad music makes broken people cry even more, depressing music makes depressed people more depressed, party music makes jolly people want to party - what do you think that propaganda/war music does to hot-shots? There is no "just music". Music influences human emotions and behavior, some more some less, but always does; and it can be way more lethal than an actual weapon.
Telefunken wrote:I just don't agree with the idea that information is so tightly controlled that it is restricted to a singular person or singular group of collectors within the community
I don't understand where did you get this idea, but there is no community, nor a group (as in a connected group) of collectors. There was a forum (SCF), but it doesn't exist anymore, and nevertheless even then it was the info that was being exchanged, not the sound files. The information isn't and wasn't tightly controlled, it was largely lost already during WWII; but now, as you may have seen, it is becoming more and more available to public, thanks to enthusiasts like myself who spend years (soon decades) of daily research and are recovering it from oblivion, from collector to collector, from document to document, one by one. All for free (but apparently this isn't enough). There is no some secret database or storage of material, if that's what you thought. At least that I know of.

Now let's please get back to the topic, which is record reviews.

Cheers,
Ivan

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Alexander B.
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Grammophon C 2767

Post by Alexander B. » 09 Jun 2015 11:46

You are right, Ivan. Time to go back to the real subject at hand.

First though, let me say that your work IS appreciated, very much in-fact. By me, of course, and by many that don't even know who you are. For example, the fact that the pirates have been able to properly credit SS Musikzug 42 as the band responsible for the tracks used in "Der Sieg der deutschen Nation" based on information that you've provided is testament to just how far your work has spread, even if thats not exactly the kind of people that should really have your work. :lol: The point is, you've made an amazing difference in a study that, as you said yourself, was in pieces and has been so since the end of the war. You seem to be the most well versed out of any collectors I have met so far, you seem to really know what you're talking about and beyond that seem to care about the future of the information, which is a very admirable thing, especially when the information is as scattered as it is. Without information you've provided I 1. Wouldn't know half the people I buy records from. 2. Wouldn't understand what a large contribution Herms Niel made to music and how much impact his work still has. and 3. Would probably be handing out recordings of my records indiscriminately to unsavories without giving it a second thought. I hope to eventually know as much as you know, maybe even have as fantastic a collection. As I said before, don't take my confusion about this subject and its set of new rules and frustration with a lack of a true community as a personal problem with you, as it is farthest from that, you are really the only person that has been friendly enough to help me get my collection started and provide me with the information I need to keep going, and for that I have immense appreciation. You helped me get started when I didn't even know "Erika" was a Herms Niel song.

NOW...
Back to records

A song of Niel's that I feel gets less recognition than it deserves, "Mein schönes Fuldatal". (Ich bin der Bub vom Fuldatal)- A great song that I personally enjoy, I especially like the march accompaniment that precedes the start of the lyrics, it is among my favorite accompaniments by Niel.

My copy is the version by Herms Niel and his own Reichsmusikzug des RAD, the version I've been told is superior, but I honestly haven't really been able to hear anything I like more or dislike less opposed to the Imperial 19139 recording by the Musikkorps des Luftnachrichten-Regiments des Oberbefehlshabers der Luftwaffe.

Grammophon-C-2767.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Mein schönes Fuldatal [Marsch]
Composer: Herms Niel
Trio: Ich bin der Bub vom Fuldatal/ Composer/Lyricist: Anonym
Arranger: Bernhard Kutsch
Arranger [Lyrics]: Otto Lindemann
Vocal Group: Männerchor
Musical Group: Reichsmusikzug des Reichsarbeitsdienstes, Potsdam-Golm
Conductor: Obermusikzugführer Herms Niel
Recording Date: 29.03.1938
Recording Location: Berlin, Lützowstraße 111-112
Record Company: Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

O, du schöner Westerwald [Marsch]
Composer: Arno Hildebrand
Trio: Westerwaldlied (O, du schöner Westerwald)/ Composer/Lyricist: Anonym
Vocal Group: Männerchor
Musical Group: Reichsmusikzug des Reichsarbeitsdienstes, Potsdam-Golm
Conductor: Obermusikzugführer Herms Niel
Recording Date: 29.03.1938
Recording Location: Berlin, Lützowstraße 111-112
Record Company: Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin
[Discographical info added by the host, Ivan Ž.]
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Re: Grammophon C 2767

Post by Ivan Ž. » 10 Jun 2015 20:10

Cheers.
Telefunken wrote:A song of Niel's that I feel gets less recognition than it deserves, "Mein schönes Fuldatal". (Ich bin der Bub vom Fuldatal)- A great song that I personally enjoy, I especially like the march accompaniment that precedes the start of the lyrics, it is among my favorite accompaniments by Niel.
Note that the song was not composed by Niel, it is a folk song. Niel composed the instrumental intro. Same thing with Hildebrand's march: intro is Hildebrand's and the song is a folk song.

Here's my Polydor variant:

Polydor-C-2767.jpg
[/size]
Ivan
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Alexander B.
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Re: Grammophon C 2767

Post by Alexander B. » 11 Jun 2015 07:40

Thanks for the info, Ivan.
I didn't know that "Mein schönes Fuldatal" wasn't Niel's composition, I've only ever seen his versions. Learning something new everyday!

I saw a very interesting Polydor copy of "Matrosenlied"/"Es geht um's Vaterland" Polydor G 11357 that I wanted, alas at 500 USD it was definitely too expensive to be a practical purchase. I have definitely changed my mind about the polydor label records after my experience with that lot from Austria that had the "Ein Gefreiter", "O du schöner Westerwald" and others in it, all Polydor. I initially wrote them off as Tempo quality recordings, but have since realized that they are actually quality records.

Regards
Alex

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Re: Grammophon C 2767

Post by Ivan Ž. » 11 Jun 2015 09:42

Telefunken wrote:Polydor. I initially wrote them off as Tempo quality recordings, but have since realized that they are actually quality records.
But of course! Polydor was simply Grammophon's label for foreign market and the recordings are Grammophon's high quality production. Polydor G 11357 is the same as Grammophon E 11357. Tempo was a different company and produced low budget recordings and cheap records.
Telefunken wrote:I didn't know that "Mein schönes Fuldatal" wasn't Niel's composition, I've only ever seen his versions.
"Mein schönes Fuldatal" is the title of Niel's march. The folk song he incorporated in it is "Ich bin der Bub (Bua) vom..." (there were many variants: Fuldatal/ Westerwald/ Aubachtal/ Elstertal/ Biebertal/ Neckartal etc).

It is very much possible that Niel composed not only the intro but also the ending ("Leb' wohl, mein Heimatland...") and that Otto Lindemann wrote those ending lyrics completely (and not that he only arranged some old ones). I haven't heard this part performed in the recordings of the solo folk song (nor I've seen it mentioned in "Ich bin der Bub" lyrics in songbooks), I've heard it only as part of Niel's march.

An example of a recording of the solo folk song, without Niel's intro/ending
Aubachtal.jpg
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Some examples of the folk song lyrics (note that there is no "Leb' wohl, mein Heimatland" part)
Fuldatal2.jpg
Aubachtal2.jpg
[/size]
Cheers,
Ivan
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Alexander B.
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Re: 78 rpm record reviews [military music]

Post by Alexander B. » 12 Jun 2015 10:16

Ivan Ž. wrote:
Telefunken wrote:Polydor. I initially wrote them off as Tempo quality recordings, but have since realized that they are actually quality records.
But of course! Polydor was simply Grammophon's label for foreign market and the recordings are Grammophon's high quality production. Polydor G 11357 is the same as Grammophon E 11357. Tempo was a different company and produced low budget recordings and cheap records.
I do know the two were separate companies, I was looking for a way to describe my initial impression of the Polydor label. My first experience with Polydor label records was when I was in Hungary this past summer and procured some Hungarian market recordings, all of them coming from separate places around Budapest. They all seem to be deteriorating as a material, the shellac feels soft, and you can rub them with only a little force and shellac will start coming off with your finger, they also don't feel like the other Polydor records I have, in thickness and quality of construction. They're all very thin and have rough edges and the labels aren't centered well.

Here is an example from that trip.

Polydor G 47575

Polydor-G-47575.jpg
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Ivan Ž. wrote:
Lili Marleen (Lied eines jungen Wachtpostens)
Composer: Norbert Schultze
Lyricist: Soldat Hans Leip
Arranger: Bruno Seidler-Winkler
Vocalist: Mimi Thoma
Vocal Group: Männerchor
Musical Group: Orchester
Conductor: Lutz Templin
Recording Date: 30.09.1941
Recording Location: Berlin, Central-Theater (Alte Jakobstraße 30-32)
Record Company: Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

Lieber Soldat, mein Kamerad! [Lied]
Composer/Lyricist: Franz Wilczek
Vocalist: Mimi Thoma
Musical Group: Orchester
Conductor: Lutz Templin
Recording Date: 30.09.1941
Recording Location: Berlin, Central-Theater (Alte Jakobstraße 30-32)
Record Company: Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin
Also of questionable quality were the Odeon label records I found, which despite my aversion to them due to their label color being hard to photograph, are usually top quality records with great sound. Hungarian versions were surprisingly bad. Not so much a problem with the actual record material or sound quality but the labels themselves were deteriorating at an interesting rate that I've never seen even on the most worn of copies from the German market, with pieces of the label having bubbled up and flaked off, the labels were also poorly printed, with text and numbers running into each other and into the label artwork, and again not well centered.

Some examples of Odeon labels that I brought home.

Odeon A 235740

Heres an example of what I believe to be an export version of Odeon O-11842 with the Musikzug SS-42. Printed well, low quality paper, bubbling and tearing though,.

Odeon-A-235740.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Horst-Wessel-Lied (Die Fahne hoch!)
Melody: ?/ Composer: Anonym
Lyricist: Horst Wessel
Vocal Group: Chor des SS-Sturms 3/II/42, Berlin
Musical Group: Musikzug der SS-Standarte 42, Berlin
Conductor: Musikzugführer Alexander Heinz Flessburg
Recording Date: 14.03.1933
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27), Raum IV
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin

Volk, an’s Gewehr! (Siehst du im Osten das Morgenrot?) [Kampflied der SA-Standarte 7]
Dedication: Meinem verehrten Gauleiter Pg. Dr. Goebbels in dankbarer Erinnerung herzlich zugeeignet
Composer/Lyricist: SA-Sturmbannführer Arno Pardun
Vocal Group: Chor des SS-Sturms 3/II/42, Berlin
Musical Group: Musik- und Spielmannszug der SS-Standarte 42, Berlin
Conductor: Musikzugführer Alexander Heinz Flessburg
Recording Date: 13.03.1933
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27), Raum IV
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin
Odeon A 235760

Another example showcasing the lack of consistency in the printing and cutting of the labels. See how to BIEM rights society seal is in noticeably different heights, also look how the printing runs off the label, or perhaps the label was cut off the sheet poorly, we also see the text running into the art a little bit here, at the bottom. It seems the Hungarian records (Or perhaps all export Odeon?) had a different number system which was much longer. Worst though is that if you look closely the record labels are of a distinctly different size compared to each other. Interesting for a collector, but I would not have been a very happy customer if I went to the store and received workmanship like this for my hard earned money back in the day.

Odeon-A-235760.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Lili Marleen (Lied eines jungen Wachtpostens)
Composer: Norbert Schultze
Lyricist: Soldat Hans Leip
Arranger: Helmut Koch
Vocalist: Irene de Noiret
Vocal Group: Waldo-Favré-Chor, Berlin
Musical Group: Orchester
Conductor: Helmut Koch
Recording Date: 02.10.1941
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27)
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin

Es wiegt sich ein Schiff im Wind [Langsamer Foxtrot]
Composer: Sascha von Stollberg
Lyricist: Wera von Stollberg
Arranger: Helmut Koch
Vocalist: Irene de Noiret
Vocal Group: Waldo-Favré-Chor, Berlin
Musical Group: Orchester
Conductor: Helmut Koch
Recording Date: 02.10.1941
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27)
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin
Odeon A 235761

This one here is perhaps the worst example of lazy text control on the Hungarian Odeon records. But it is also a very strange outlier from the rest, as it has the typical high quality royal blue Odeon label paper, is cut well and is not bubbling and rubbing off of the record due to poor materials used or poor application. (The damaged label on the B side appears to have once had a collectors label over it, and as such isn't the manufactures fault) The text setting and leveling is extremely poor, though. I've noticed the great majority of record labels might have the text at a different angle by MAYBE a couple of degrees, I see this small difference in degree with many of my Grammophon labels, the results of working on things on an industrial scale before computerized production, and that is understandable, but this here is just lazy. Here we see on side A, BIEM is printed ontop of the Odeon artwork, The title is printed into the record's hole, everything is tilting slightly to the right, and of course the worst looking part is that its all pushed far right onto the right side of the label where the end of the words are going into the right side of the artwork.

Odeon-A-235761.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Lili Marleen (Lied eines jungen Wachtpostens)
Composer: Norbert Schultze
Lyricist: Soldat Hans Leip
Arranger: Helmut Koch
Vocalist: Sven-Olof Sandberg
Vocal Group: Waldo-Favré-Chor, Berlin
Musical Group: Orchester
Conductor: Helmut Koch
Recording Date: 11.10.1941
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27), Raum II
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin

Ich schreibe meiner Mutter einen Brief [Lied]
Composer/Lyricist: Fred Kassen
Arranger: Helmut Koch
Vocalist: Sven-Olof Sandberg
Musical Group: Orchester
Conductor: Helmut Koch
Recording Date: 11.10.1941
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27), Raum II
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin
Odeon O-5107

This is probably the overall best example of the Hungarian records I have found, although it has the lower quality paper/application, it has been stored fairly kindly, and has not suffered bubbling and peeling, nor does it share the same degree of crooked text/bleeding into the artwork.

Odeon-O-5107.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Marcia Reale / Giovinezza
Composer: Giuseppe Gabetti / Giuseppe Blanc
Lyricist: / Salvator Gotta
Musical Group: Banda Fascista (Gran Concerto „Citta di Chieti“)
Conductor: Domenico Valenti
Recording Date: 1934
Recording Location: Berlin
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin

Faccetta nera (La canzone dei Legionari)
Composer: Mario Ruccione
Lyricist: Renato Micheli
Musical Group: Orchestra
Conductor: Del Pistoia
Recording Date: ?
Recording Location: Milano
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin
Radiofunken R 8007

Although unrelated to the rest of these, here is another record that fits the same kind of theme. A "Radiofunken" label meant for the US market. From what I understand they were actually not at all part of Telefunken and we're instead pirates that stole lots of sound recordings and made their own records with them. Very interesting. The only complaint I have about this record is that it is very thin, one of the thinnest non flexible 78's I have ever encountered, and as such is already very worn.

Radiofunken-R-8007.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Horst-Wessel-Lied (Die Fahne hoch!)
Melody: ?/ Composer: Anonym
Lyricist: Horst Wessel
Arranger: Carl Woitschach
Vocal Group: Chor des SA-Sturms 33 und Mitglieder der SA-Standarte 1, Berlin
Musical Group: Blasorchester Carl Woitschach, Berlin
Recording Date: 05.04.1933
Recording Location: Berlin, Sing-Akademie (Unter den Linden 5)
Record Company: Telefunken-Platte GmbH, Berlin

Ich hatt’ einen Kameraden (Der gute Kamerad)
Composer: Friedrich Silcher
Lyricist: Ludwig Uhland
Musical Group: Blasorchester Carl Woitschach, Berlin
Recording Date: 21.11.1936
Recording Location: Berlin, Sing-Akademie (Unter den Linden 5)
Record Company: Telefunken-Platte GmbH, Berlin
Regards
Alex

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Re: Grammophon C 2767

Post by Schmeisser » 12 Jun 2015 16:14

Telefunken wrote:2. Wouldn't understand what a large contribution Herms Niel made to music and how much impact his work still has.
Ahaha :D Big surprise! :D That happens to everyone who knows Ivan :milwink:

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Re:

Post by Ivan Ž. » 12 Jun 2015 17:04

Hello, Alex

Very nice display and comparison of Odeon labels.
Telefunken wrote:It seems the Hungarian records (Or perhaps all export Odeon?) had a different number system which was much longer.
As far as I remember without checking, export Odeon labels (not only Hungarian) indeed had different, longer numbering.
Telefunken wrote:Radiofunken
I have the same record, also sounds worn out. The downside is that "Ich hatt' einen Kameraden" wasn't copied complete. Original recording has two drum rolls at the beginning and Radiofunken released it without the first drum roll. Is it the same on your copy?
Schmeisser wrote:Ahaha :D Big surprise! :D That happens to everyone who knows Ivan :milwink:
Hahahaha, stop it :lol:

Cheers :D
Ivan

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Re:

Post by Fallersleben » 12 Jun 2015 19:38

Telefunken wrote:...
Heres an example of what I believe to be an export version of Odeon O-11842 with the Musikzug SS-42. Printed well, low quality paper, bubbling and tearing though,.
...
It's the O-11846.

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Re:

Post by Fallersleben » 12 Jun 2015 21:30

Telefunken wrote:Back on the subject of "SA marschiert", does anyone have any label scans?
Ivan Ž. wrote:why are we discussing "SA marschiert" instead of the original, "Argonnerlied"?
SAmarschiert2.jpg
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Re:

Post by Alexander B. » 19 Jun 2015 02:33

Ivan Ž. wrote:Hello, Alex

Very nice display and comparison of Odeon labels.
Telefunken wrote:It seems the Hungarian records (Or perhaps all export Odeon?) had a different number system which was much longer.
As far as I remember without checking, export Odeon labels (not only Hungarian) indeed had different, longer numbering.
Telefunken wrote:Radiofunken
I have the same record, also sounds worn out. The downside is that "Ich hatt' einen Kameraden" wasn't copied complete. Original recording has two drum rolls at the beginning and Radiofunken released it without the first drum roll. Is it the same on your copy?

Cheers :D
Ivan
Ivan,
As always thank you for adding the recording information for us.

The Odeon labels I found last summer were indeed quite interesting, there were a-lot more interesting recordings I wish I would have picked up.

As to the the completeness of my copy, I have just listened to it again (it has been a very long time) Mine also has only the second of the two drum rolls recorded. My copy is not in perfect shape and looks to have originally been played extensively. But you say your copy is bad sounding as well? Perhaps the telefunken record the tracks came from originally was also not in the best condition? Do you have a label scan of the song's original Telefunken record?
Fallersleben wrote:
Telefunken wrote:...
Heres an example of what I believe to be an export version of Odeon O-11842 with the Musikzug SS-42. Printed well, low quality paper, bubbling and tearing though,.
...
It's the O-11846.
Thanks for the clarification, I recently purchased a copy of O-11842 and its got the same two songs (down to the Be/Bi numbers) credited to the 42nd. Perhaps two different takes of the same songs or maybe just a repressing of the same record?
Fallersleben wrote:
Telefunken wrote:Back on the subject of "SA marschiert", does anyone have any label scans?
Ivan Ž. wrote:why are we discussing "SA marschiert" instead of the original, "Argonnerlied"?
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Thank you for more label scans of the original Argonner-Marsch.

Currently my only version of the original Argonner-Marsch is the common Telefunken A-2259, it is by far my favorite recording of the song to date.

Its interesting how many recordings of the SA version I've seen go by Argonner-Lied first, and by its SA title second, or even not at all. I suppose in similar fashion to the SA version of "Rote Husaren"

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Fallersleben
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Re:

Post by Fallersleben » 19 Jun 2015 16:15

Here you can see the difference:

Odeon O-11842
Horst Wessel-Lied mit Chor (Be 10276)
Volk ans Gewehr ohne Chor (Bi 1286)

Odeon O-11846
Horst Wessel-Lied mit Chor (Be 10276)
Volk ans Gewehr mit Chor (Bi 1287)

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