78 rpm record reviews (military music)

Discussions on the music in the Third Reich. Hosted by Ivan Ž.
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Alexander B.
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Re: Polydor 2 17319

Post by Alexander B. » 22 May 2015 00:34

After thinking about it for a while, I decided it is best for now to simply have the record professionally transcribed.

For anyone interested, here are the unlisted songs, I'll do full videos on them soon, but for now I don't have the time to put full feature videos together.

[Links to the sound files have been moved to the original post (see the previous page). Ivan Ž.]

Once again, thanks to @Ivan for all the help on this particular record.

Schmeisser
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Re: Polydor 2 17319

Post by Schmeisser » 22 May 2015 08:45

Thanks so much for these records! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Is it possible to know matrix-numbers?
Last edited by Schmeisser on 22 May 2015 13:40, edited 1 time in total.

Auceps
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Re: Polydor 2 17319

Post by Auceps » 22 May 2015 09:34

Great!!! Thank you very much for such rarities! :D :thumbsup:

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Alexander B.
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Brillant-Special 217

Post by Alexander B. » 28 May 2015 09:29

@Schmeisser and @Auceps, thank you, I'm glad some people enjoyed it!

Another record that I've been enjoying recently, Brillant-Special 217. Definitely my personal favorite version of "Nachtmarsch", and a well recorded version of "Schlesierlied", although not my cup of tea.

I've also got one of my holy grail finds coming in soon, I admit that I am an absolute sucker for this particular march, I've also never heard this version to my knowledge, and we all know how much I love mystery songs: "Durch deutsches Land marschieren wir" (also known more commonly as "SA marschiert") on Schallplatten-Volksverband M 2052.

Brillant-Special-217.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Nachtmarsch
Composer/Lyricist: Werner Altendorf
Vocalist: Wilhelm Hesse
Vocal Group: Singschar des SA-Sturms 30
Instrumental Group: Kapelle der SA-Gruppe Berlin-Brandenburg
Conductor: Musikzugführer Johannes Fuhsel
Recording Date: 1933
Recording Location: Berlin
Record Company: NS-Schallplatten-Industrie

Schlesierlied (Kehr’ ich einst zur Heimat wieder)
Composer/Lyricist: Anonym
Arranger: Rolf Herzog; B. Bernards
Vocalist: Wilhelm Hesse
Vocal Group: Singschar des SA-Sturms 30
Instrumental Group: Kapelle der SA-Gruppe Berlin-Brandenburg
Conductor: Musikzugführer Johannes Fuhsel
Recording Date: 1933
Recording Location: Berlin
Record Company: NS-Schallplatten-Industrie

* B. Bernards = Bernhard Kutsch
[Discographical info added by the host, Ivan Ž. Links to files digitized by a different collector removed.]
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Re:

Post by Ivan Ž. » 28 May 2015 17:12

Telefunken wrote:I've noticed that you resize my photos and make polarize them, making them much better to look at. How is that process done so I can do it myself and save you the trouble?
In Photoshop, but it's no trouble, whenever I have time. No worries.
Telefunken wrote:recording dates [...] How is this information found
There are original recording lists of several record companies still in existence. But they are often quite tricky to understand and one must really know what to look for in the lists and on the records themselves. One small hidden additional number can make even a whole year of difference in the recording date and can even identify an entirely different performer. Several excerpts of the Lindström and Telefunken company recording lists have been rewritten by Christian Zwarg and can be found for free here http://discography.phonomuseum.at/ But bare in mind that they aren't complete nor perfect; there are unfortunately a couple (not much) of misinterpretations and wrong identifications added by Zwarg, but overall, a great job done and extremely helpful. A fantastic work by Alan Kelly on HMV & related stuff can be found here http://www.charm.rhul.ac.uk (note: there are some minor errors and typos which will make some searches difficult / without results). Again, reminder: one must carefully look at all of the numbers on the record, including the hidden ones, and only then search in the lists for the additional info - and, again, must know in which list to search for (it can really be very tricky). So it's best to recheck every such info here.
Telefunken wrote:Brillant-Special 217
Ivan Ž. wrote:Links to the files digitized by a different collector removed. Ivan Ž.
Dear Alex, I've noticed that the last six videos on your youtube channel contain sound files digitized by other collectors, not yourself. Please do NOT do that. I can understand that their sound might be better than yours, and you have the same records anyway, so what's the difference, etc. But! There is a difference. First of all, people who produce sound files of great quality do pay a lot more money for a record in mint condition than the ones who buy used/damaged ones. They also spend more money and time on the sound reproducing system. Let's respect that. But! What is even more important is the following: there are many cases where different takes of a recording were released on the same record under (seemingly) the same numbers. In these cases, you might not even notice that you have a slightly different version than some well known one - and then you replace your rare unknown version with the better sound of a similar but different, well known version. And the info that the two different takes were actually in existence gets lost this way. For example, we have discovered so far, in 3 different collections, 3 different takes of "Matrosenlied" (Gramm. rec.). When you hear them they sound the same; but when you compare them in a sound editing program you see the difference in the rhythm etc. Numbers are seemingly the same, but there are indeed written also very small different numbers of takes, not visible on the labels. There are also some different takes (again, seemingly the same) where we can hear some errors in singing, then the corrected versions, etc. There are more reasons for not using other people's files, but this one which potentially damages the historical research, is the most important one.
Telefunken wrote:a well recorded version of "Schlesierlied", although not my cup of tea
Note that at the time Fuhsel recorded the same arrangement of the song also with another singer (Rudolf-Reinhard Sorger), which can be found under the mx. Tono 2075.
Telefunken wrote:I've also got one of my holy grail finds coming in soon, I admit that I am an absolute sucker for this particular march, I've also never heard this version to my knowledge, and we all know how much I love mystery songs: "Durch deutsches Land marschieren wir" (also known more commonly as "SA marschiert")
Don't be too disappointed after you receive it, because you've heard it for sure. It is a well known and mass-produced record. But still nice. It is Männecke's "Argonner-Marsch" which has the "SA marschiert" song in trio (when I typed "Argonner-Marsch" in Google just now, the first result was this version). Your real "Holy Grail find" so far is actually Polydor 2 17319, and thanks for sharing those sound files by the way. Are those the complete files, or are the intros missing?

Cheers,
Ivan

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Alexander B.
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Re:

Post by Alexander B. » 28 May 2015 19:57

@Ivan

Gee wiz, what a huge pile of information! You sir, work too hard!

1. I do understand in Photoshop :D. I was hoping you could give me the dimensions that you preferred for the forum, and instruct me as to what the secret to polarizing the records are, I'm pretty handy with Photoshop (I am a computer sciences major), but my attempts with at least my pictures of my record labels have not gone as well as normal landscape photographs and the like, and a polarizing filter on my Nikon 5200 makes the record labels look extremely tired. Its my dream when I finally have all my equipment unpacked at home that I'll just take my collection and scan all the labels with a large format scanner, so they look just as the should, all beautiful and perfectly round, and the Odeon ones will maintain their nice deep royal blue color. Even with proper lighting, Odeon records have been beyond irritating for me to photograph and edit, to the point that I think I subconsciously avoid buying them when I have a choice! My favorite colored labels are always Grammophon Red.

2. Thanks for the links and information. Even if it is not perfect its definitely better than nothing!

3.I will refrain from using sourced content in the future, I admit that currently I don't have any of my materials or sound equipment aside from my preamp, my Dual 1009SK AND Dual 1019 are both off getting fixed and I don't even have my desktop with the sound cards in it running right now, I'm reduced to an acoustic phonograph that I don't dare put anything rare on, lest it ruin anything difficult to replace. So I've been "borrowing" other recordings from random places around the internet. A practice that I definitely shouldn't be engaging in. I don't even have that nasty little turntable I reproduced my first few common records on like 4 years ago anymore, it went to the trash.

A question I might stem off from this subject, I have a very hard time finding any information on the equalization curves for these records. Is there a source you could point me to, as proper curves make a world of difference at least in my opinion!

4. Thanks for additional information on other recordings.

5. Me and Michail actually were talking about what version it was earlier! Unfortunately for me thats one of my least favorite versions of it, BUT! its still SA marschiert, and I still love it! I should explain better, I understand that it isn't a super rare record, but I have a certain draw to that particular march, I've never really understood why, perhaps its the articulation of the lyrics or the powerful message, or perhaps its the fact that I have not been able to obtain a copy and its become one of those "Want because I can't have" things, but it is absolutely one of my favorites, (its so hard to have just one with this hobby) especially when it comes to more propaganda-like music.
Do you or anyone else have any more examples of "SA marschiert" labels I could see? As I said, Its one of my favorites, so I'm fairly positive I'd love to see all the different versions.

6. As to the completeness of those two songs from the Polydor record. "Ein Volk - ein Reich" is complete, although I admit that it doesn't sound complete in the beginning, since the whole thing is really just a pieced together over edited pile short sections in the beginning it loses its "lead in" quality, that subtle difference in sound the outer grooves have compared to the rest of the music. I admit to goofing around a little with that record on my acoustic phonograph to try and see if anything was missing, it seems complete. Its also much like my copy of "Mein Nam' ist Annemarie" where the music starts almost instantly once the grooves start, instead of starting a few in. "Ein Gefrieter" I think definitely is missing an intro, and it does have some sort of instrumental at the beginning that I can here when I put it on my acoustic turntable. I've contacted my friend to see if he forgot to put the fragments for the intro together for that one, we will see!

Thanks
Alex

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Re:

Post by Ivan Ž. » 29 May 2015 11:20

Hello, Alex

Regarding "SA marschiert": well it is understandable you are drawn to it, as you say, it is an incredibly catchy tune, which is still sang today in Germany (go for example to a Borussia Dortmund match). There are many recordings of the SA variant of this tune; I personally do not collect political records (I do have some though), but most are known to me nevertheless. My recommendation to you would be to search for Grammophon recordings of the song, by Engel's band ("Durch deutsches Land..." it's the one with stomping boots; they also recorded "Durch Groß-Berlin..." version, not as effective) and by Ewers' band ("Im Schlesierland..." an enthusiastic, a bit faster or let's call it "jumpy" version). These two are the best I've heard. I also liked the communist shawm cover of the tune by Kopczyk's band (Artiphon, 1928).

Cheers,
Ivan

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Lyra 17/18

Post by Ivan Ž. » 29 May 2015 11:21

Lyra-17-18.jpg
[/size]

Das muß den Ersten Seelord doch erschüttern [Foxtrot]
Melody: Das kann doch einen Seemann nicht erschüttern [Foxtrot]/ Composer: Michael Jary
Lyricist: Gerhard Fließ
Vocal Group: Schuricke-Terzett, Berlin
Instrumental Group: Fred Dömpke mit seinen Solisten, Berlin
Recording Date: 29.11.1939
Recording Location: Berlin
Record Company: Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

Matrosenlied (Wir fahren gegen Engelland)
Composer: Herms Niel
Lyricist: Hermann Löns
Arranger: Gustav Skibbe
Vocal Group: Soldatenchor
Instrumental Group: Reichsmusikzug des Reichsarbeitsdienstes, Potsdam-Golm
Conductor: Obermusikzugführer Herms Niel
Recording Date: 19.10.1939
Recording Location: Berlin, Central-Theater (Alte Jakobstraße 30-32)
Record Company: Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin



Here's one of my favourites, a tiny (size of a modern CD) anti-British early war propaganda record, produced by the Deutsche Grammophon company. The first song, "Das muß den Ersten Seelord doch erschüttern", is a parody of the (at the time new) sailors' hit song "Das kann doch einen Seemann nicht erschüttern". The new lyrics were written by Gerhard Fließ; they are praising Günther Prien's (U-47) sinking of the British battleship "Royal Oak" (14.10.1939) and mocking the British Fleet, Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and, most of all, the First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill. Note: "Erster Seelord" means the "First Sea Lord", which was the title held at the time by Dudley Pound, but it is much more likely that the lyrics are referring actually to the First Lord of the Admiralty (and in Germany much more known) Winston Churchill (who held the same position in the WWI as well). Song originally had four strophes; in this short propaganda recording, only the 3rd strophe was recorded, with the refrain from the 4th (last) strophe. Lyrics were published the same year (1939) in the songbook "Der Führer hat gerufen" - but they were merged with the original sailors' hit song (Das kann doch einen Seemann...) and under the new title: "Das kann die ganze Flotte nicht erschüttern". The first three strophes were written by Bruno Balz (Das kann doch einen Seemann...) and the additional four were written by Fließ (Das muß den Ersten Seelord...). The second track on this record is an excerpt from (at the time new but already famous) Niel's own recording of his "Matrosenlied" (see also the release of the full recording on page 2). The excerpt contains the instrumental march intro with the 1st strophe.

Ivan Ž.


WinstonChurchill.jpg
[/size]Winston Churchill
Born: 30.11.1874 Woodstock
Died: 24.01.1965 London
Occupation: Politician
Rank/Title: Prime Minister
Political Party: Conservative Party; Liberal Party

Photo Source: Library of Congress

NevilleChamberlain.jpg
[/size]Neville Chamberlain
Born: 18.03.1869 Birmingham
Died: 09.11.1940 Heckfield
Occupation: Politician
Rank/Title: Prime Minister
Political Party: Conservative Party

Photo Source: Wellcome Images

GuentherPrien.jpg
[/size]Günther Prien
Born: 16.01.1908 Osterfeld
Missing/Killed: 07.03.1941
Occupation: Naval Commander [U-47]
Rank/Title: Korvettenkapitän

Photo Source: Österreichische Nationalbibliothek

nophoto.jpg
[/size]Gerhard Fließ
Born: ?
Died: ?
Occupation: ?


FredDoempke.jpg
[/size]Fred Dömpke
Pseudonym: Fernando Aleman
Born: 19.06.1907 Hamburg
Died: ?
Occupation: Composer; Bandleader; Accordionist

Photo Source: Fred Dömpke Akkordeon-Album

Schuricke-Terzett.jpg
[/size]Schuricke-Terzett
Location: Berlin
Founded: ?
Dissolved: ?
Members: Karl Golgowsky [2. Tenor], Rudi Schuricke [1. Tenor], Horst Rosenberg [Baritone]

Photo Source: 78erplatten.at
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Alexander B.
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Hakenkreuz & Eichenlaub 6

Post by Alexander B. » 30 May 2015 05:22

@Ivan

What an interesting tune, I've never heard it before now, and you're right about that record being small! The parody is less than 2 minutes long!
I have heard the song that it is based on though, and I dare say I like this one just a little better, Its just a tad on the "snarky" side, its got that kind of "sophisticated joke attitude" much like the "Siegfried line" parody :lol: .

While we're on the topic of these interesting records produced by the big companies with a different label on them, heres something new of mine thats along a similar line, although its a full size 25cm (10 inch) record and neither of them are parodies. Mines got a nice crack running up about a quarter of the way, but its still very playable and the record is complete. "Hitlerleute" being one of my propaganda favorites, I've never really liked Horst Wessel Lied, but its a fitting combination.

Back on the subject of "SA marschiert", does anyone have any label scans?

Hakenkreuz-Eichenlaub-6.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Horst-Wessel-Lied (Die Fahne hoch!)
Melody: ?/ Composer: Anonym
Lyricist: Horst Wessel
Vocal Group: Männerquartett
Instrumental Group: Blasorchester Carl Woitschach, Berlin
Recording Date: 1933
Recording Location: Berlin
Record Company: Deutsche Crystalate GmbH, Berlin-Reinickendorf

Faschistenmarsch (In dem Kampfe um die Heimat)
Melody: Giovinezza/ Composer: Giuseppe Blanc
Lyricist: Edgar Poelchau
Instrumental Group: Blasorchester Carl Woitschach, Berlin
Recording Date: 1933
Recording Location: Berlin
Record Company: Deutsche Crystalate GmbH, Berlin-Reinickendorf
[Discographical info added by the host, Ivan Ž.]
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Re: Hakenkreuz & Eichenlaub 6

Post by Fallersleben » 30 May 2015 11:11

I have same record and it's a bit funny because every time I saw (not often!) one from this Hakenkreuz & Eichenlaub series it's these #6. If I remember correctly Woitschach's band is playing here.

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Re: Hakenkreuz & Eichenlaub 6

Post by Ivan Ž. » 30 May 2015 11:37

Fallersleben wrote:If I remember correctly Woitschach's band is playing here.
Indeed (see the info I've added above). It is the same record as the early variant of Kristall 2037 (mx. C 4552-1 / C 4520). Woitschach was uncredited there as well.

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Ivan

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Re:

Post by Ivan Ž. » 01 Jun 2015 14:03

Telefunken wrote:Back on the subject of "SA marschiert", does anyone have any label scans?
Here are examples of some of the recordings of the full song and of various arrangements of the song, from SCF collectors. Of course, even more recordings were made, this is not all.
SAmarschiert.jpg
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Alexander B.
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Gloria GO-10865

Post by Alexander B. » 07 Jun 2015 05:57

Ivan Ž. wrote:Here are examples of some of the recordings of the full song and of various arrangements of the song, from SCF collectors. Of course, even more recordings were made, this is not all.
What a great assortment of labels and versions. Thanks for sharing those for me. I've never heard the "Im Schlesierland" version, I'll add that to the list of songs like Sturm 23/7 version of "Deutscher Kampf im Lied" that I want to hear that nobody seems willing to share with me!

I'm drooling over those, I especially like that NS-Schallplatten-Industrie version.
Maybe you know someone who is selling a version of it somewhere, Ivan?

Also something I had a question about a record I purchased in a job lot recently, and I don't think I've ever heard either of the songs. I looked around on the internet and found a similar song to the one on side B, but I haven't found anything about the song on side A. Do you know anything about it? I have had good luck with Harry Steier, and I bet that this will be a very interesting tune.

Gloria-GO-10865.jpg
[/size]
Ivan Ž. wrote:
Soldaten müssen sein! [Marschlied]
Composer: John Walter; Siegfried Mitlacher
Lyricist: John Walter
Vocalist: Harry Steier
Vocal Group: Gemischter Chor
Instrumental Group: Orchester
Conductor: Kapellmeister Otto Dobrindt
Recording Date: 13.06.1933
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27), Raum II
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin

Herr Hauptmann, Herr Leutnant [Marsch-Foxtrot]
Composer/Lyricist: Bert Reisfeld; Hans Lengsfelder; Rolf Marbot
Vocalist: Harry Steier
Vocal Group: Männerquartett
Instrumental Group: Orchester
Conductor: Kapellmeister Otto Dobrindt
Recording Date: 29.10.1932
Recording Location: Berlin, Carl Lindström AG (Schlesische Straße 26-27)
Record Company: Carl Lindström AG, Berlin

* John Walter = John Walter Rühle
[Discographical info added by the host, Ivan Ž.]
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Ivan Ž.
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Re:

Post by Ivan Ž. » 07 Jun 2015 10:42

Telefunken wrote:I'm drooling over those, I especially like that NS-Schallplatten-Industrie version.
Maybe you know someone who is selling a version of it somewhere, Ivan?
No, no, no, don't drool, it is absolutely horrible! I tried but I NEVER managed to listen to any recording by the Schalmeienkapelle "Horst Wessel" completely. I think 20 seconds of this demoralizing and depressing off-key noise is the maximum my ears can take. Maybe even less. I don't know anyone who sells it and I wouldn't recommend it to you, to anyone, not even to my worst enemy.
Telefunken wrote:I've never heard the "Im Schlesierland" version, I'll add that to the list of songs like Sturm 23/7 version of "Deutscher Kampf im Lied" that I want to hear that nobody seems willing to share with me!
As I already told you privately, cool it down with the political material. Nazism and similar ideologies are still very much alive and I do not want this forum and especially myself to participate in any type of spreading of any political propaganda.
Telefunken wrote:Also something I had a question about a record I purchased in a job lot recently, and I don't think I've ever heard either of the songs. I looked around on the internet and found a similar song to the one on side B, but I haven't found anything about the song on side A. Do you know anything about it?
See the added info.

Both songs were composed/written in 1932.

Cheers,
Ivan

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Alexander B.
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Re:

Post by Alexander B. » 07 Jun 2015 13:53

Info is appreciated, Ivan. Thank you.

I was not commenting on the quality of the band, but the label (although I've never heard that particular group, so I'd have nothing to compare it to) The N-S-I records have beautiful font choices specifically, I especially like the few that I've seen with a Fraktur font. I also like how everything is arranged in a circular way around the center of the label with artwork (if a Swastika can really be called that) in the center by itself. I have noticed that many of the N-S-I records are of a lower quality, they're very thin records, and I imagine that they would have worn very fast on the record players of the time. Just something different compared to the standard labels I see, I like the Telefunken "Weinacht" records for the same reason, with a little picture up-top.

Regarding the neo-nazi menace and their hindering of my ability to collect records or collect information:

I don't quite understand the aversion everyone has to political records, I understand that there are risks in collecting them in Europe, and risks in sharing the content, but is this not an apolitical forum with a musical discussion area that is here specifically for that purpose? It is just music, it is only dangerous to those who decide to make it so. That is, of course, nothing personal against you, Ivan, I am just becoming frustrated because I don't understand why there is so much worry (everywhere, on every forum I've been to) put into making sure historically viable information is hidden. I understand now why it took me so long to find people willing to introduce me to this hobby. Every collector I've talked to has looked at me funny and scurried off.
I suppose the neo-nazi's have to ruin historical exploration for everyone, but I am only curious, I understand that letting them have material like that would be a bad day for everyone, but isn't there a point where we just have to stop letting them ruin things for us? I would appreciate a source via PM if that is at all possible, and that way it won't be online for them to find themselves, and I would not distribute it. I apologize for the failure to consider that idiots like that still roam around, as said before, we are lucky not to have to listen to them much here in the United States, but we have our own breed or racists, and they ruin just as many things for us.
Last edited by Alexander B. on 07 Jun 2015 14:28, edited 1 time in total.

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