Matrosenlied (Heute wollen wir ein Liedchen singen...)

Discussions on the music in the Third Reich. Hosted by Ivan Ž.
JLEES
Member
Posts: 1992
Joined: 26 Apr 2002 04:01
Location: Michigan, USA

Matrosenlied (Heute wollen wir ein Liedchen singen...)

Post by JLEES » 25 May 2004 23:32

[Topic renamed by the host, Ivan Ž.]

Hello,
I think this postcard is a song about Günther Prien, the noted U-Boat commander who sank the Royal Oak. Does anyone know what this card says?
James

forum2Priena.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Johnny
Member
Posts: 525
Joined: 06 May 2003 13:37
Location: Sweden, Scania

Post by Johnny » 26 May 2004 00:15

The picture is too small for me to be able to read it properly. From the words I can make out it goes something like: Today we want to sing a little song ... give me your hand ... because we're going, because we're going, we're going towards England. The flag flaps on the mast, she shows the power of our Reich... /J

JLEES
Member
Posts: 1992
Joined: 26 Apr 2002 04:01
Location: Michigan, USA

Post by JLEES » 28 May 2004 20:01

I didn't know that the author, Hermann Löns, lived from 1866-1914. Was the song "Denn wir fahren gegen Engeland!" written during the Great War?
James

User avatar
Erich-SA
Member
Posts: 156
Joined: 13 Mar 2002 06:32
Location: Southern California

Post by Erich-SA » 29 Aug 2004 07:44

This is one of the most famous war songs--it was originally written in WWI. In WWII, Herms Niel (a well known composer of miltary and popular songs) wrote a new melody for the words, and it's available on many tapes and cds. It was a naval song, not about U Boats, but about sailing against England in general.
Erich

User avatar
Ivan Ž.
Host - Music section
Posts: 8455
Joined: 05 Apr 2005 12:28
Location: Serbia

Post by Ivan Ž. » 19 Sep 2005 22:37

Several composers wrote music for this song before Niel (such as Jäkel, Ramrath and so on). This particular version of the lyrics, although published during WWII, is NOT the one used in the WWII composition (Niel's), but a rarer older variant. In Niel's composition there's "ein Liedlein singen" (while in this one there's "Liedchen") and "Gib mir deine Hand" (in this one there's "Reich' mir deine Hand").

Cheers,
Ivan

Return to “Music of the Reich”