Herms Niel

Discussions on the music in the Third Reich. Hosted by Ivan Ž.
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Anasterian
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Erika

Post by Anasterian » 14 Apr 2014 13:05

Hello, anyone know where I can find sheet music for songs such as Erika? I've been looking hard but I haven't found anything. would be great to get a score for a full band but just a good Piano arrangement would be fine, I can make the rest out with that as a template.
Ein lied... drei... vier!

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Wim
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Re: Erika

Post by Wim » 18 Apr 2014 11:47

Here is one.

From the songbook "Lieb Vaterland"

Erika songbook Lieb Vaterland.jpg
[/size]
Wim
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Any information about Flemisch in German service (Waffen SS, OT, NSKK, Kriegsmarine, DRK, ...) during WWII is welcome.

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Fallersleben
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"NIEL" the book

Post by Fallersleben » 26 Apr 2014 18:32


Kurt12123
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Re: Erika

Post by Kurt12123 » 29 Jun 2014 04:30

Anasterian wrote:Hello, anyone know where I can find sheet music for songs such as Erika?
http://www.blasmusik-shop.de/navi.php?s ... 29da44326a

Brings up 14 "hits" but looks like only 2 are band arrangements. But at a very good price!

I've had good luck with this source here in the US. Last piece I ordered (about 3 weeks ago) arrived in less than a week of being ordered on-line.

There are also several march medleys that contain Erika - look under "potpourri."

Good luck.

GregSingh
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Herms Niel concert in Warsaw, 1940

Post by GregSingh » 08 Sep 2014 06:19

In Dr.Karl Grundmann's article "Deutsches Kulturleben In Warschau" (March 1941) I found this:
...Dem stärkeren Theaterleben ging ein sich immer mehr entfaltendes Musik leben zur Seite. Das große Konzert der Dresdner Philharmoniker füllte bis auf den letzten Platz das 2000 Personen fassende "Roma", das vor dem Kriege Lichtspielhaus, jetzt vorwiegend für politische Veranstaltungen bestimmt, und damit zum "Sportpalast" von Warschau geworden ist. Hier finden die großen Kundgebungen statt, in denen Reichs- und Volksdeutsche sich schon oft zu erhebenden Feierstunden zusammengefunden haben, um nur an die erste Großkundgebung am 28.I.1940 mit dem Gauleiter Frauenfeld oder an das Großkonzert des Arbeitsdienstes mit Herms Niel zu erinnern...
In the publication Warschau Unter Deutscher Herrschaft (1942) you can read:
...Einer der Höhepunkte war die Feierstunde des Reichsarbeitsdienstes am 31.8.1940, zu der über 20 000 deutsche Menschen aus dem gesamten Distrikt in Warschau zusammengeströmt waren...
Does anyone know when actually that "Großkonzert des Arbeitsdienstes" took place in Warsaw's Roma theatre?

Thanks,
Greg
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Chimera
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Post by Chimera » 24 Oct 2014 17:36

Need help id'ing the song in the vid/link please :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRCJ82FXnaw

I tried asking the uploader but he doesn't know lol... thanks!!

GregSingh
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Post by GregSingh » 25 Oct 2014 04:12

:welcome:

"Es ist so schön, Soldat zu sein"
If we become increasingly humble about how little we know, we may be more eager to search.

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Fallersleben
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Post by Fallersleben » 30 Nov 2014 21:49

Photo was taken in France, 1943.

Niel_France_1943.jpg
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Fallersleben
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Post by Fallersleben » 30 Nov 2014 21:52

Place and date are unknown to me.

Niel_nn.jpg
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Last edited by Fallersleben on 01 Dec 2014 10:27, edited 1 time in total.

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Ivan Ž.
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Post by Ivan Ž. » 30 Nov 2014 22:14

Fallersleben wrote:Photo was taken in France, 1943.
With a bit of patience and careful work this photo could be almost fully restored. A nice one, Frank!
Fallersleben wrote:Place an date are unknown to me.
This one reminds me of photos of Niel I have from Amsterdam (haven't scanned them yet), only mine were taken on the ground so it is very hard to compare. But it was a concert for Luftwaffe (soldiers in your photo also seem to be Luftwaffe men) and it was held in front of a large building (you can see yours was taken from a window which is not very close to the ground) and the position of the orchestra is similar (again, hard to compare). Let's leave it unidentified for now. Nice one as well! Thanks for posting both.

Cheers,
Ivan

Sid Guttridge
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Post by Sid Guttridge » 05 Dec 2014 12:56

A fascinating thread of the off-beat (no pun intended) sort that justifies the existence of sites like AHF.

It leads me to wonder to what extent Niel and his works were genuinely popular, or whether his prolificness and profile was more down to his official position within the regime's cultural organs?

For example, the wartime popularity of Lilli Marlene seems to have arisen accidentally due to a genuine popular response amongst the troops. But did official-sounding works such as The Song of the Luftwaffe Auxiliary elicit the same popular response?

Cheers,

Sid.

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Ivan Ž.
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Post by Ivan Ž. » 05 Dec 2014 13:49

Hello, Sid

This is a good question which requires probably a bit longer reply and analysis, but I'll try to keep it short for now. There is still much to be written on Niel. "The Song of the Luftwaffe Auxiliary" is basically an unknown song, and without the postcard posted by "Claymore" most people (myself included) wouldn't even know it ever existed. We still haven't found another source mentioning this piece. It's from the late stage of the war, probably 1943 (or maybe even 1944, but I'd rather say 1943), and at the time military songs were already rarely made and had little significance (I wrote about this before online). After 1942, only a small number of marching tunes was recorded, in 1943 (and afterwards almost nothing until the end of the war). People in Germany were getting sick of marching and aggressive tunes due to the development of the war and casualties in most families. However, soldiers' songs were still being made - but this time as calm, slow pop or waltz songs, generally sang by soothing female voices - which was more suitable for the families in Germany and soldiers at the front. So, we shouldn't even be discussing possible popularity of the marching music in the period after 1942.

Niel started becoming popular in the late 1920s [his initial popularity had nothing to do with the NS regime - it actually had to do with his already popular half-Jewish colleague Ailbout; but the regime did later (mis)use Niel's popularity - and he didn't complain as far as I can tell], and by the beginning of the war he already had several international hits, translated in a couple of languages. There would probably be much more of such widely recognised hits if there wasn't for his involvement in the war propaganda. Niel's style always remained the same [one of the main reasons of his popularity]; even in the stiff campaign songs, he always incorporated some jolly folk-motives; but with the progress of the war, music also had to be appropriately updated. Which is why, in mid-1941, young Schultze with his fresh, original and brutal melodies basically replaced old Niel as the composer of campaign songs (I've never heard of a composer before nor after Schultze who could create such merciless, fanatical war-music; but this tallented composer left only a couple of such pieces behind him and much more of nice and peaceful tunes). Long story short, Niel and many of his works were indeed very much popular [many still are, and are considered traditional German songs], and hardly because of the regime; they were simply incredibly catchy and mostly made in the traditional German spirit.

The most popular war-song of the WWII was Niel's "Matrosenlied" (Wir fahren gegen Engelland), which was a hit instantly (Niel was asked for the encore immediately after the first performance); and the most popular soldiers' love song was Schultze's "Lili Marleen" - but it took two years of war for it to be noticed and to become "in" (it is questionable whether it would ever become popular in the peacetime). It's interesting that both compositions had lyrics written in WWI.

Cheers,
Ivan

Sid Guttridge
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Post by Sid Guttridge » 08 Dec 2014 11:29

Hi Ivan,

A fascinating reply.

Popular culture in WWII Germany seems to be an overlooked subject (at least in English) compared with the UK and USA.

Cheers,

sid.

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Fallersleben
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Re: Herms Niel

Post by Fallersleben » 10 Oct 2015 11:05

A postcard (9x14cm), no further informations.
HN.jpg
A big autograph card (18x24cm) with signature and info "Am Brenner [Brenner Pass] den 15.10.1940".
HN2.jpg
A panoramic photo (2 parts) (15x43cm), taken in Rome.
HN3.jpg
Remember the photo from Rome on page 2 posted by Ivan. It's likely the same concert.

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Fallersleben
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Re: Herms Niel

Post by Fallersleben » 10 Oct 2015 14:34


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