Soviet manpower and red-army age in 1944-45

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Art
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Re: Soviet manpower and red-army age in 1944-45

Post by Art » 12 Oct 2019 15:55

A proportion between men and women population registered by the USSR censuses of 1959 and 1970 as a function of the year of birth.
Gender ratio.png
The registered numbers in the census of 1959 were a little skewed: many respondents gave an approximate age ("about 30"), hence they were registered as born in 1928. For some reasons this effect was larger for women then for men. The census of 1970 was apparently closer to reality. In any case the effect of conscription is seen very clearly from both censuses. Also they confirm that the class of 1927 (the last class officially called until the end of the war) suffered relatively few military casualties.
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Typhoon_MkII
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Re: Soviet manpower and red-army age in 1944-45

Post by Typhoon_MkII » 19 Oct 2019 13:38

Stiltzkin wrote:
10 Oct 2019 11:13
That is of limited suitability, as the survivability for the age groups (for POWs) is not equal.
Yes, that's a non-negligible thing to take into account, especially since the young 1920-1923 classes that formed the main part of the troops captured in 1941 were among the least likely to be still alive by 1944-45.

Stiltzkin
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Re: Soviet manpower and red-army age in 1944-45

Post by Stiltzkin » 19 Oct 2019 13:53

Yes, that's a non-negligible thing to take into account, especially since the young 1920-1923 classes that formed the main part of the troops captured in 1941 were among the least likely to be still alive by 1944-45.
The rest would of course carry over into the 17-21 range by 1944, if these prisoners were mainly confined to the operations of 1941 (doubtful). Of particular interest would be the eye witness accounts of the residents of Berlin, who spotted very young soldiers in the Soviet ranks or information from Fremde Heere Ost on POWs.

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Re: Soviet manpower and red-army age in 1944-45

Post by Art » 20 Oct 2019 16:56

Typhoon_MkII wrote:
19 Oct 2019 13:38
Yes, that's a non-negligible thing to take into account, especially since the young 1920-1923 classes that formed the main part of the troops captured in 1941
Honestly speaking I don't see what it should be so.
Of particular interest would be the eye witness accounts of the residents of Berlin, who spotted very young soldiers in the Soviet ranks or information from Fremde Heere Ost on POWs.
There are recorded cases of "foster soldiers" i.e. orphan kids adopted by military units. However, they were relatively rare and not much significant statistically. An Illustration from records of personnel passing through Soviet transfer centers and replacement units in 1944 (processing of records at https://obd-memorial.ru/html/advanced-search.htm). Total 3 729 thousand men whose age was recorded, including:
born in 1933 - 6
1932 - 32
1931 - 73
1930 - 160
1929 - 577
1928 - 1258
1927 - 111 005
1926 - 367 403
1925 - 331 481
1924 - 230 788
etc etc. Which includes some number of number of typos and mistakes made by clerks. As already said the class of 1927 was the last which was officially called during the war (starting from end of 1944).

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