The official AHF Third Reich music quiz thread

Discussions on the music in the Third Reich. Hosted by Ivan Ž.
User avatar
Ivan Ž.
Host - Music section
Posts: 6175
Joined: 05 Apr 2005 12:28
Location: Serbia

Re: Question 90

Post by Ivan Ž. » 26 Nov 2019 19:00

Teppeny wrote:
26 Nov 2019 18:28
I know that the melodie is "Musketier' sind lust'ge Brüder" but I have no clue of this song, the far I undestood is "Unser Hauptmann..."
:thumbsup:

It is indeed the folk song "Musketier' sind lust'ge Brüder" (also known as "Siegreich woll'n wir Frankreich schlagen"), cut from Gustav Gnauck's march "Soldatenmut", a recording from 1940 by Hans Teichmann's band. It's the 2nd strophe: "Unser Hauptmann steigt zu Pferde, führt uns in das Feld. Siegreich woll'n wir Frankreich schlagen, sterben als ein tapfrer Held."

Being tied to the Franco-Prussian war (1870), the old "Musketier' sind lust'ge Brüder" song was repopularised during the invasion of France (1940). Composer Herms Niel used its melody in two of his war campaign songs: as closing tune in "Kamerad, wir marschieren im Westen!" (Frankreichlied) and as trio in "Gegen Briten und Franzosen" (Marsch nach der Melodie: Siegreich woll'n wir Frankreich schlagen). Teichmann's band recorded the old Gnauck's and the new Niel's compositions in one recording session, dedicated to the invasion of France.

As I wrote before - war and propaganda songs are not just music, as ignorant people often like to "think" and claim. There's much symbolism and hidden messages in them, above all the reminders of past conflicts with a certain nation, whose purpose is to reawake old enmity and hatred.

Over to Teppeny!
Ivan

User avatar
Teppeny
Member
Posts: 77
Joined: 28 Jan 2018 17:04
Location: France

Question 91

Post by Teppeny » 07 Dec 2019 22:19

Hello, sorry for the late reply, I had a problem with my computer.
https://youtu.be/dW9gl9DcgpU
What is the name of the melody of this french boy scout song ? It's very easy, I don't have inspiration.

Good luck !
Teppeny

Auceps
Member
Posts: 296
Joined: 04 Dec 2009 17:03

Re: Question 91

Post by Auceps » 09 Dec 2019 18:58

Hello,

it's 'Als die gold'ne Abendsonne'. :)

Cheers,
Auceps

User avatar
Teppeny
Member
Posts: 77
Joined: 28 Jan 2018 17:04
Location: France

Re: Question 91

Post by Teppeny » 11 Dec 2019 18:21

Good answer! It was really easy !
Your turn now !

Auceps
Member
Posts: 296
Joined: 04 Dec 2009 17:03

Question 92

Post by Auceps » 14 Dec 2019 22:57

Thanks, Teppeny!

My question would be a bit complicated: Which pretty famous march and salon music composer (non-Jewish) was officially proclaimed as 'unwelcome' for the Waffen-SS bands? A small hint: His most famous march has a Latin title.

Tretyak
Member
Posts: 16
Joined: 16 May 2018 20:42
Location: Moscow

Re: Question 92

Post by Tretyak » 14 Dec 2019 23:18

Is it perhaps Ernst Urbach with his "Per aspera ad astra"?

Auceps
Member
Posts: 296
Joined: 04 Dec 2009 17:03

Re: Question 92

Post by Auceps » 14 Dec 2019 23:28

Correct! His music was considered 'unwelcome', because, according to the official ordinance of the SS-FHA from January 20, 1942, his compositions and arrangements 'distort' standart compositions of the German musical repertoire in 'escpecially kitchy and disrespectful manner' and make them to a corner stone of 'cheap and completely outmoded salon medleys'.

Your turn!

Tretyak
Member
Posts: 16
Joined: 16 May 2018 20:42
Location: Moscow

Question 93

Post by Tretyak » 17 Dec 2019 09:27

Okay!) An easy one: though this composer had achieved great success with his music for Olympic games of 1936, he was heavily attacked in the next year after the premiere of his new opus. What was it and why did it happen?

User avatar
D-General
Member
Posts: 31
Joined: 29 Jun 2018 14:16
Location: Philippines

Re: Question 93

Post by D-General » 18 Dec 2019 06:15

I’m guessing this would be Richard Strauss, he was heavily attacked since he had a Jewish daughter in law and his grandchildren were also Jewish, also he was using his influence as President of the Reichsmusikkamer to protect them.
"Don't fight a battle if you don't gain anything by winning."(Erwin Rommel)

Tretyak
Member
Posts: 16
Joined: 16 May 2018 20:42
Location: Moscow

Re: Question 93

Post by Tretyak » 18 Dec 2019 14:42

Unfortunately not, this isn't him. ''My'' composer is much younger, but he was also born in Munich, so you were close! :milwink:

Maikowski
Member
Posts: 61
Joined: 31 Mar 2010 01:39

Re: Question 93

Post by Maikowski » 20 Dec 2019 10:21

I would say Carl Orff and his Carmina Burana because of some erotic content 8-) and an alleged russian influence.
Cheers
Maiko

Tretyak
Member
Posts: 16
Joined: 16 May 2018 20:42
Location: Moscow

Re: Question 93

Post by Tretyak » 20 Dec 2019 15:22

Maikowski wrote:
20 Dec 2019 10:21
I would say Carl Orff and his Carmina Burana because of some erotic content 8-) and an alleged russian influence.
Cheers
Maiko
Yes, absolutely right! :)

Maikowski
Member
Posts: 61
Joined: 31 Mar 2010 01:39

Question 94

Post by Maikowski » 28 Dec 2019 01:22

Thank you Tretyak ! :milwink:

Hi everyone !
I hope you all had a merry Christmas. Please receive my apologies for the delay in posting this new question... :oops:
Now you will have to identify this song, here interpreted by Carl Woitschach's Blasorchester :


Good luck and a happy New Year to all of you !
Maiko

User avatar
Ivan Ž.
Host - Music section
Posts: 6175
Joined: 05 Apr 2005 12:28
Location: Serbia

Re: Question 94

Post by Ivan Ž. » 28 Dec 2019 01:36

Ha, I've been playing this song often lately, after a very long time ;) I completely forgot about it previously, and then I couldn't get it out of my head. But I'll let someone else identify it :)

(A good version, by the way, which I haven't heard before; all recordings by that chorus [13/20] are very rare, I've heard only two so far.)

Happy New Year, everyone!
Ivan

Auceps
Member
Posts: 296
Joined: 04 Dec 2009 17:03

Re: Question 94

Post by Auceps » 28 Dec 2019 17:35

Hello and happy New Year everyone!

I guess it'd be 'Der Luftschutz auf der Wacht' by Werner Günther and Carl Echtermeier (another, more famous recording was made by Grammophon-Orchester in 1935 or so). :)

Cheers,
Auceps

Return to “Music of the Reich”