Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Discussions on all aspects of the German Colonies and Overseas Expeditions. Hosted by Chris Dale.
User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 05 Sep 2021 15:29

Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?
“On the morning of August 3, 1914, the German community of Kinshasa, as well as several hundred specially-recruited
able-bodied Congolese, left port for the Sangha River, the main artery serving eastern Kamerun, then a German
colony. The mission of the “Dongo”, a steamer of the Kamerun Schiffahrt Gesellschaft company, was to link up with
German forces and ships located on the Sangha and return in force to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville. Unfortunately
for German aspirations, French troops out of Brazzaville aboard the “Albert Dolisie” were on their heels and by August
6 the “Dongo” was captured and German plans to control the upper Congo and Ubangi Rivers were dreams. The
Great War had come to Leopoldville.”
Source: http://kosubaawate.blogspot.com/2014/08/

Does anyone know more details, or is it again only a fake-report from a history-revisionist?
Cheers Holger
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
danebrog
Member
Posts: 367
Joined: 17 Nov 2008 15:59

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by danebrog » 08 Sep 2021 11:01

The Text ist quoted 1:1 from:
River Gunboats: An illustrated Encyclopaedia by Roger Branfill-Cook (2016)
(Mehr kann ich gerade von meinem Smartphone nicht für Dich tun)

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 09 Sep 2021 11:48

Okay; - thanks for info.
(So ein Roger; - habe ihm 2015/16 noch etliche Hinweise für Seefahrzeuge in DOA gegeben.)

By the way; - Our research in the formally `www.Panzer-Archiv.de´ is now available via the Internet Archive:
https://web.archive.org/web/20130522051 ... php?t=9780

But I will continue to investigate the information provided by Roger.
Cheers Holger
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 14 Sep 2021 14:51

“On the morning of August 3, 1914, the German community of Kinshasa, as well as several hundred specially-recruited
able-bodied Congolese, left port for the Sangha River, the main artery serving eastern Kamerun, then a German
colony. The mission of the “Dongo”, a steamer of the Kamerun Schiffahrt Gesellschaft company, was to link up with
German forces and ships located on the Sangha and return in force to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville. Unfortunately
for German aspirations, French troops out of Brazzaville aboard the “Albert Dolisie” were on their heels and by August
6 the “Dongo” was captured and German plans to control the upper Congo and Ubangi Rivers were dreams. The
Great War had come to Leopoldville.”

“Authorities in Leopoldville and the colonial capital at Boma did not learn of the formal declaration of war in Europe
until August 5th. The Belgian government authorized aggressive action against the Germans and on August 28, Georges
Moulaert, District Commissioner in Leopoldville, seized the German commercial vessels “Congo” and “Lobaye” (renamed
Liege and Haelen, respectively).”
Source: http://kosubaawate.blogspot.com/2014/08/


What is this blog claiming now? If we want to check the different statements, we have to
extract and analyse the individual text passages. The following statements have been made:


1) On the morning of August 3, 1914 . . .
It is mentioned that the European declarations of war on August 3, 1914 were known in Central Africa.

2). . . the German community of Kinshasa . . . (?)
Was there a German community in the capital of the Belgian Congo in 1914, and how big was it?

3) . . . as well as several hundred specially-recruited able-bodied Congolese . . . (?)
Here it is alleged that the Germans recruited several hundred Congolese in the Belgian territory and transported them to German territory.

4) . . . The mission of the “Dongo”, . . (?)
Was there a steamer “Dongo”, of the `Deutschen Kameruner Schifffahrt-Gesellschaft´, in 1914?

5) . . . was to link up with German forces and ships located on the Sangha . . .
Which forces of the `Schutztruppe´ were there in 1914 in the extreme south-east of the `Sangha Corner '?
How strong and where were they stationed? What other German ships were there at that time?

7) . . . and return in force to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville. (?)
What reputable source mentions the plan of the `Schutztruppe´ to seize Léopoldville (Kinshasa) and Brazzaville?


On the lower section of the map we see the whole area of the `Sangha Corner´, which was part of
`Neu-Kamerun´ from 1911 and the connection on the Congo River from Léopoldville (Kinshasa) in
Belgian Congo and Brazzaville in French Equatorial-Africa to Bonga in German Cameroon at the
estuary of the Sangha River in the Congo, as well as further up the Sangha River to in the vicinity of
Wesso in French Equatorial-Africa. Some German companies and posts are also listed on this map.

Southern Part of `Neu-Kamerun´ in 1911.jpg
Original Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... amerun.jpg


We will try to investigate these further questions.
Cheers Holger.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
danebrog
Member
Posts: 367
Joined: 17 Nov 2008 15:59

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by danebrog » 15 Sep 2021 02:12

Soldiers of their Own: Honor, Violence, Resistance and Conscription in Colonial Cameroon during the First World War
by George Ndakwena Njun

https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstrea ... sequence=1
pages 213 - 219 describes the actions at the Sangha river. There´s a mention of captured german steamers, but no names

about the "Kameruner Schiffahrtgesellschaft":
https://books.google.de/books?id=-5lQAA ... ha&f=false

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 16 Sep 2021 13:10

The first mentioned source promised some interesting details. Currently I collect only further sources:


From a British perspective
Military Operations – Togoland and the Cameroons, 1914 – 1916, F.J. Moberly, London 1931
Operations by the French, 31st July – September 1914 page 116 (152) – 117 (153)
15th 25th August Sanga – Lobaye Columns September – Gabon August & September

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id= ... &skin=2021

French action and intentions in the south and south-east, and the arrival of a Belgian detachment
October 1914, Page 174 (210)

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id= ... up&seq=210


From a Belgian perspective
Les Campagnes Coloniales Belges 1914 – 1918, Bruxelles 1927
Tome I, Les opérations au Cameroun, Chapitere premier, Généralités,

4. – Téâtre des opérations de 1914 au Cameroun (région Ubangi-Sangha) page 49
https://sammlungen.ub.uni-frankfurt.de/ ... fo/7788601


From a French perspective
La conquête du Cameroun, 1er août 1914-20 février 1916 : avec 9 croquis
http://www.universitepopulairemeroeafri ... _1916_.pdf

Les entreprises coloniales françaises – Afrique Equatoriale Française
(Many further links and Photos from Congo-steamers)
https://www.entreprises-coloniales.fr/a ... _Congo.pdf

(Also the main home page include further links)
https://www.entreprises-coloniales.fr/a ... caise.html


From a German perspective
This German source offer some interesting detail reports, but without an overlook about the situation at the Sanga River
Kämpfer an vergessenen Fronten – Der Krieg in den Kolonien – 3. Kapitel – Kamerun
https://digi.landesbibliothek.at/viewer ... 24635/167/

But all these text-passages have to be read, translated, analysed and must be compared with each other.

I come back with the summary, (. . .and maybe further questions?)
Cheers Holger
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
danebrog
Member
Posts: 367
Joined: 17 Nov 2008 15:59

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by danebrog » 16 Sep 2021 18:01

Tanzania wrote:
16 Sep 2021 13:10

But all these text-passages have to be read, translated, analysed and must be compared with each other.

I come back with the summary, (. . .and maybe further questions?)
Cheers Holger
Like "in the good old days" with Kotthaus-Tours: always on the road in the most offbeat corners of the world - eagerly appreciated :)

Olli

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 17 Sep 2021 08:29

We thought about a Congo-Tour from Kisangani to Kinshasa since over 10 years ago.
As you know, rumours mentioned a Königsberg-gun in each of the two cities. Due to
a lack of French knowledge, we are dependent on a guided tour.


Complete Congo River Cruise (22 days)
https://congotravelandtours.com/complet ... e-22-days/

Also `Bwana Tucke-Tucke´/ Carsten Möhle offer a Congo-Tour in 2022
https://bwana.de/spezialreisen/expediti ... -2022.html

But 2022 and 2023 are full booked by us, so we have to wait. . .
Cheers Holger
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 01 Oct 2021 10:45

Brief summary of the Historical and Geographical backgrounds


Before we deal with the seven questions in detail, the following is a brief summary of the background to the
areas and geographical boundaries. In the Morocco-Congo-Treaty between France and Germany, in addition
to claims in North Africa, the boundaries of both contracting parties in Central Africa were newly regulated.
NEU-KAMERUN – Das von Frankreich an Deutschland im Abkommen vom 4. November 1911
abgetretene Gebiet, Dr. Karl Ritter, Verlag von Gustav Fischer, Jena 1912. (332 Seiten / 16,3 MB)

https://ia800204.us.archive.org/28/item ... ttuoft.pdf


The area of this German `Schutztgebietes´ increased considerably in the east and south; - from half a million
to over three quarters of a million square kilometres. The following map gives an overview of the existing and
projected infrastructures before the start of the war in German-Cameroon.
(What the blue numbers next to the rivers mean, however, is unclear because the explanation is missing. It
could be water level indicators in mm? Here, of course, the extended question arises as to whether these are
maximum or minimum values during the rainy or dry season? Maybe the figures are also maximum ship to?)
Eisenbahn- und Schiffahrtskarte für Kamerun 1914
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamerun_( ... (1914).tif


The two ray-like area expansions in New-Cameroon are noticeable here. Both enabled a connection to the most
important and largest Central African River, the Congo. This river, with the extension via Leopoldville (Kinshasa)
and Matadi, offered a connection to the French Atlantic port of Boma. Navigable rivers were then the easiest and
fastest way to develop the respective areas. (This led to the unusual shape of the `Caprivi-Zipfel´ in GSWA in
order to get a connection to the Zambezi-River.)


In New-Cameroon it was in the east, the `Ubangi-Zipfel´, named after the second largest tributary of the Congo.
However, the Ubangi-River did not flow through any German territory. Only a 23 km wide strip formed a border
with the, still existing village of Zinga (German: Singa) and thus an access to the Ubangi and subsequent Congo-
Rivers
. The Lobaye-River (German: Lobaje) flowed into the Ubangi 5 km south of Zinga, and was also navigable
for the first 120 km.
Ubangi-Fluss https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubangi_(F ... vermap.png
Ortschaft Zinga https://www.google.de/maps/dir/Zinga//@ ... 714415!1m0


In order for a better understanding the further connections in the clarification of the claims in the blog, the southern
`Ssanga-Zipfel´ is of particular interest. The eponymous river Sangha (German: Ssanga) was then exclusively on
German territory. The western border of the `Ssanga-Zipfel´ was formed by the so-called Likouala-Mossaka-River
(German: Likuala). In the east, the Ssanga-River first delimited German territory. After 50 km, the Likouala-aux-
Herbes-River
(German: Grüner Likuala) took over this border definition to the surrounding French Equatorial-Africa.
Fluss Sangha https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... sinmap.png
Likouala-Mossaka-Fluss https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Likouala-Mossaka
Likouala-aux-Herbes-Fluss https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Likouala-aux-Herbes



At the southernmost point of the `Ssanga-Zipfel´, the German part of the actual Congo bank was only 5 km wide.
02_Neu-Kamerun_Bonga Post at the Ssanga.png
Original Source:
Mitteilungen aus den deutschen Schutzgebieten, “Die Grenzgebiete Kameruns im Süden und Osten“,
Landeskundlicher Teil, Das deutsche Kongo-Ufer an der Ssanga-Mündung, Berlin 1914, Seite 136

https://brema.suub.uni-bremen.de/dsdk/p ... fo/2168589 (185 Seiten, 32,6 MB, Download via pdf.)

Today's Google position: https://www.google.de/maps/@-1.1873486, ... a=!3m1!1e3

The French village of Mossaka, which appears on the upper map in the left corner, is still there today. The
former German border and customs post Bonga, however, no longer; - even if the name still appears in
Wikimapia, at the coordinates 1 ° 6'48 "S - 16 ° 52'34" E. http://wikimapia.org/#lang=de&lat=-1.11 ... 8&z=15&m=w



German Bonga Border-Post im November 1912
03_Bonga Post in 1912.png
Same Original Source like above, but on page 125

04_Bonga Post in 1912.png
Same Original Source like above, but on page 125


In addition, it must be mentioned that the Morocco-Congo Treaty was signed in November 1911, but the last
official and final handover by the Franco-German Border Commission did not take place until June 1, 1913 in
the town of Carnot, on the territory of New-Cameroon, so 13 months before the start of the WW 1.

Cheers Holger
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
danebrog
Member
Posts: 367
Joined: 17 Nov 2008 15:59

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by danebrog » 01 Oct 2021 12:28

(What the blue numbers next to the rivers mean, however, is unclear because the explanation is missing. It
could be water level indicators in mm? Here, of course, the extended question arises as to whether these are
maximum or minimum values during the rainy or dry season? Maybe the figures are also maximum ship to?)
Surely the same as the red numbers next to the railroad lines: Passable distance in km
For example:
The Chari River is 100km navigable from Ft. Lamy in both directions.
Also 100km for the trip from Wesso at the Ssanga River to Molundu at the confluence of the Dscha- and Bumba River.
(Compare the map scale on the top left)

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 01 Oct 2021 14:06

Your explanation seems logical. But what makes me suspicious are the numerical values mentioned on the map.

On the map, 400 km are indicated on the Sangha, from Bonga at the mouth, to Wesso.
. . . Schließlich ist noch der Sangha von seiner Mündung in den Ubangi aufwärts 1180 km
weit bis Quesso das ganze Jahr für Schiff mit einem Tiefgang von 1,2 m befahrbar. . .
Source: Französisch Äquatorial-Afrika, von Karl Hänel, Kurt Schroeder Verlag, Bonn 1958, Seite 45.
https://www.worldcat.org/title/franzosi ... lc/3808878

So there are 400 km from 1914, against 1180 km from 1958.
Probably the publisher had determined the distances as the crow flies before WW1?!
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 01 Oct 2021 16:49

Furthermore, the documents and plans in the German Federal Archives, which can be described as
reputable primary sources, have proven to be very useful. Here is the list of sources that should also
be helpful, special in answering the seven points:

Erwerb von Neu-Kamerun. (6 Bände)
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/e ... eu-kamerun

Kameruner Schiffahrtsgesellschaft
Akt(e)BArch, R 1001/3890 - Kameruner Schiffahrtsgesellschaft: Bd. 1

https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/k ... chaft-bd-1
Akt(e)BArch, R 1001/3891 - Kameruner Schiffahrtsgesellschaft: Bd. 2
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/k ... chaft-bd-2

Schiffahrtsverhältnisse in Neu-Kamerun, BArch, R 1001/3889
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/s ... eu-kamerun

Waffen- und Munitionshandel in Neu-Kamerun, BArch, R 1001/3852
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/w ... eu-kamerun

Feldzugserlebnisse der 6. Kompanie der ehemaligen Schutztruppe für Kamerun
von Leutnant a.D. Polizeihauptmann Reinhardt Siemonsen, BArch, R 1001/9538

https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/f ... -siemonsen

Kaiserliche Schutztruppe in Kamerun. – Organisationsunterlagen, BArch, R 1001/9589
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/k ... unterlagen

Kämpfe der Ost- und Südostabteilung in Kamerun während des 1. Weltkriegs. - Skizzen
Aug. 1914 - Febr. 1916 (Anlage), BArch, R 1001/9596

https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/k ... gs-skizzen

Kriegstagebücher der 6. Feldkompanie in Kamerun, Aug. 1914 - Okt. 1914 (Anlage), BArch, R 1001/9518
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/k ... in-kamerun

Skizzen zum Bericht der Abteilung Zimmermann über die Gefechtslage in Kamerun
Nov. 1914 - Jan. 1916 (Anlage), BArch, R 1001/9515

https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/s ... in-kamerun

Verteilung der Schutztruppenangehörigen, Serie (Bd. 1+2 . . .?)
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/v ... ngehorigen

Verteilung der Schutztruppenangehörigen: Bd. 3, Mai 1909 - Juni 1913 (Anlage), BArch, R 1001/9510
https://archivfuehrer-kolonialzeit.de/v ... rigen-bd-3

So there is still plenty to do.
Cheers Holger
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 657
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Schutztruppe in Kamerun want to seize Kinshasa and Brazzaville in 1914?

Post by Tanzania » 08 Oct 2021 09:40

Preliminary comparison of sources

In the first week of August 1914, the mutual declarations of war between Germany, France, England and Belgium
took place in Europe. During the same period, on 5. August 1914, the Committee of Imperial Defence in London
decided to extend the war on the African continent and to eliminate the opposing German colonies. Also on the
same day, the British Deputy Governor for Nigeria, A.G. Boyle, a proclamation to set up an expeditionary force, the
Land Contingent Unit, to prepare the appropriate measures against the German territories, Togo and Cameroon.

The respective capitals of all parties involved in the war in Africa were, of course, informed by radio and telegraph,
about the events in Europe and the decisions of their respective governments. This was particularly true for the cities
on the Congo River, Brazzaville, Leopoldville and Coquilhatville, which had the appropriate means of communication.

Due to the late establishment of German colonies towards the end of the 19th century. According to nature, the means
for further transmission of orders within the respective colonies were still in their infancy. Especially in the areas of
Cameroon and East Africa, which are distant from the coasts, in some cases the victims only learned of the beginning
of the war when they were attacked by the enemy.

The hostilities in Cameroon started already on Monday, 21. September 1914 (not 24. September!) When the
French gunboat `Surprise´ shelled the small German coastal town of Ukoko, south of the Spanish colony of Rio Muni.


Military Operations: The Cameroons – Action at the outbreak of war.

The Lobaye-valley offered the German a better line of advance, than the Sangha salient, which was covered with
pathless dense forest or marsh. But as the Germans could transport troops rapidly down the Sangha-River in
steamers to the Congo, the French decided on the 1st August (1914) to send a detachment to Mossaka to command
the Sangha-Congo confluence and to form a base for a subsequent advance on Wesso, a point which, by its dominant
position towards the Sangha salient, offered important advantages for covering the Congo and their frontier of middle
Congo.

On the 29th July, on receiving the warning telegram from France, M. Merlin, Governor-General of French
Equatorial Africa, sanctioned the immediate issue by General Aymerich of the following instructions. . .

[ . . . ]

. . . On the 1st August the local Council of Defence agreed on certain other measures, including the rapid
transportation of troops to the Sanga-Congo confluence, both to protect the line of the Congo and to form a
base for a possible offensive up the Sanga. The general result of these measures during August was as follows:

[ . . . ]

Middle Congo; 2nd – 31st August 1914.

In Middle Congo, on 2nd August the requisitioned river steamer `Largeau´ – armed with a quick-firing gun and
equipped with a portable wireless – and a detachment of 130 infantry with a mountain gun were sent to Mossaka.
This detachment, learning of the declaration of war before the Germans, occupied Bonga without opposition on the
6th had been brought, by reinforcements, to a strength of 375 rifles with three mountain guns. Including the `Largeau´,
they had several steamers, including two captured from the Germans; and the officer commanding, hearing that the
Germans had been late in learning of the declaration of war,* (The French had captured a German steamer taking the
first news of this up the river) decides to make a rapid advance up the Sanga to Wesso. On the way he heard that
Germany from Ikelemba had destroyed a party of French militia near Wesso and had occupied that place. But they
evacuated it again on the 29th on hearing of the advance up the Sanga of the French detachment from Bonga, why
was thus able to occupy Wesso without opposition on the 31st August.

Source:
History of the Great War, Military Operations Togoland and the Cameroons 1914 – 1916. Compiled by arrangement
with the Colonial office, under the direction of the historical section of the committee of Imperial defence, Chapter III,
Operations by the French, – Sanga and Lobaye Columns. Page 115 – 117.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

II. Kamerun
Östlicher und südlicher Kriegsschauplatz

[ . . . ]


Über den Überfall auf den deutschen Posten Bonga sind wir durch den nachfolgenden Bericht eines Augenzeugen
eingehend unterrichtet:

Am 6. August 1914 weckte mich mein Boy um 5 Uhr morgens und sagte mir, es käme ein Schiff aus dem Kongo in
den Ssangafluß auf Bonga zu. Nachdem ich mich angezogen, ging ich zum Zollposten, um Waren und Briefe, welche
eventuell mit dem Schiff kommen könnten, in Empfang zu nehmen. Das Schiff kam wegen der vielen Sandbänke im
Flusse nur langsam näher.

Es mochte etwa noch 1 km entfernt sein, als wir (Herr (Vizefeldw. Wilhelm) Mellenthin, Zollassistenz und Postenführer,
und ich) in rascher Reihenfolge Kanonenschüsse hörten. Im Augenblick hielten wir diese Schüsse für Salut; als aber
ein Geschoß durchs Dach ging und die weiteren dicht bei uns einschlugen, sahen wir, dass es ernst war. Wir wurden
mit einem Hagel von Geschütz- und Gewehrfeuer überschüttet. Die Sirene (?) des Postens gellte Alarm. Wir waren 3
Weiße (Herr Mellenthin, Herr Sanitätsbeamter Deuschel, welcher an schwerem Malariafieber im Bette lag, und ich),
ferner 12 schwarze Soldaten.

Wir dachten, es handele sich um einen Aufstand von schwarzen Soldaten oder Eingeborenen. Da der Zollposten in
einem verheerenden Geschütz- und Gewehrfeuer war, zogen wir und bis ins Negerdorf Bonga zu meiner Faktorei
zurück. Hier erwarteten wir die Angreifer. Wieviel Soldatenweiber, Kinder und andere Schwarze getroffen waren,
konnten wir nicht feststellen. Von uns war wie durch ein Wunder niemand verletzt, nur ein Soldat hatte einen Arm-
schuss. Nun sahen wir eine Rotte Senegalschützen um die Ecke der Dorfstraße biegen. Wir eröffneten das Feuer
und sie zogen sich zurück.

Nach kurzer Zeit kamen sie in einer Truppe von über 100 an mit Kanonen, und wir mussten uns in den Urwald zurück-
ziehen. Hier verlor ich Herrn Mellenthin mit seinen 12 Soldaten aus den Augen. Ich lief mit meinem Koch und Boy nach
dem Ssangafluß zu; hier traf ich auf einen meiner Leute, welcher mit seinem Boote den Fluss hinaufruderte. Wir gingen
aus dem schützenden Urwald ins Boot und wurden sofort von unterhalb des Flusses beschossen; mehrere Kugeln
durchschlugen das Boot, von uns wurde jedoch niemand verletzt, und wir erreichten glücklich die nächste Flussbiegung.

Hier hielten wir an. Ich hörte lebhaftes Gewehrfeuer; wem das galt, war mir unbegreiflich, da doch von unserer Seite
niemand mehr in Bonga war. Jetzt kamen geflüchtete Neger bei uns an, welche mir erzählten, dass weiße Offiziere bei
den Soldaten wären. Darauf ging ich zurück zu meiner Faktorei, welche aufgebrochen und fast vollständig ausgeraubt
war. Zwei Blechkisten mit ungefähr 1900 Frcs. waren ebenfalls weg. Das Dorf war vollständig leer.

Nach einiger Zeit bemerkte ich am Ende der Dorfstraße eine Anzahl schwarzer Soldaten mit einem Kolonialoffizier;
letzterer winkte mich herbei und fragte mich wer ich wäre; auf meine Antwort, dass ich der Vertreter einer englischen
Company sei, wurde ich vor den Kommandanten geführt, welcher meine Papiere durchsah und mir erklärte, da ich
Deutscher sei, müsste er mich zum Kriegsgefangenen machen. Ich wurde nicht mehr zu meiner Faktorei zurück-
gelassen und Tag und Nacht von drei Soldaten bewacht. Ebenso wie meine Faktorei (das heißt die englische), war
auch die Faktorei der französischen Kompagnie total ausgeplündert worden.

Am anderen Tage kam ein Flussdampfer mit einem deutschen Kapitän und 60 Arbeitern (Schwarze) den Fluss
hinauf. Der Dampfer wurde von den französischen Truppen geentert, der Kapitän, Herr Höpfner von der Handels-
Gesellschaft Südkamerun, wurde durch Schulterschuss schwer verwundet, und die 60 hilflosen Neger wurden
alle abgeschlachtet
(?).

Nach zwei Tagen wurde ich auf einem Dampfer unten im Laderaum (welcher 80 cm hoch ist) nach Brazzaville am
Stanleypool gebracht, wo ich über und über mit Schlamm bedeckt ankam und im Gefängnis mit Schwarzen
zusammen zwei Monate kriegsgefangen war. Von meinen Koffern hatte ich noch drei, die anderen waren gestohlen.
In einem dieser Koffer befanden sich 700 Frcs. meiner Company und 1500 Frcs. persönliches Geld. Diese 2200 Frcs.
nahm der Offizier des Dampfers, welcher mich nach Brazzaville brachte, trotz meines Einspruches an sich. Nach zwei
Monaten ließ mich der Gouverneur gegen Ehrenwort frei. Auf meine Reklamation, die 2200 Frcs. zurückzugeben,
wurde mir erwidert, da ich keine Quittung hätte, bekäme ich nichts zurück. Es gelang mir, nach der Küste zu kommen
und mit einem portugiesischen Schiff über Lissabon nach hier zu gelangen.


[ . . . ]

Nach dem Überfall von Bonga im Ssanga-Zipfel und von Singa im Ubangi-Zipfel zogen sich unsere Truppen unter
hartnäckigen Kämpfen zurück, und zwar in einem Fall den Ssanga aufwärts bis Nola, im anderen Fall den Lobaje auf-
wärts bis Kolongo am mittleren Lobaje. Über diese Kämpfe liegt auch eine deutsche Schilderung vor:

Der Postenführer von Bonga sammelte seine Polizeisoldaten und führte sie zum Fluss, wo Kanus bestiegen und
abgefahren wurde. Inzwischen waren die Franzosen mit starken Streitkräften gelandet und hissten auf dem Stations-
Gebäude die französische Flagge. Die Besatzung des Postens Bonga fuhr zunächst mit zwei Kanus den Ssanga
aufwärts, traf unterwegs einen flussabwärts fahrenden Dampfer, den sie bewog, umzukehren und sie aufzunehmen.

In Ikelemba schloss sich der Postenbesatzung von Bonga diejenige von Ikelemba an, unter Führung des Polizei-
meisters Jung
. Auch Regierungsarzt (Oberarzt der Reserve) Dr. Rautenberg befand sich bei der Abteilung. In Mbiru
stieß die Abteilung Jung unvermutet auf eine französische Abteilung, die anscheinend von Wesso kam, um Mbiru zu
besetzen. Es entspann sich ein außerordentlich heftiges Feuergefecht von zwei Stunden, bei welchem 16 weiße
Franzosen und gegen 80 Farbige (Senegalesen) getötet wurden, während auf unserer Seite unter den Weißen nur
zwei schwere Verwundungen vorkamen und verhältnismäßig geringe Verluste bei den Farbigen festgestellt wurden.

Am nächsten Morgen wollte die Abteilung Jung das nahegelegene Wesso angreifen. Bei der Annäherung der
deutschen Abteilung, die nur über etwa 40 Gewehre verfügte, wurde auf der Station Wesso die weiße Flagge gehisst,
und zwar von einem Portugiesen, der nach dem Gefecht vom Tage vorher fast allein als Weißer in Wesso geblieben
war. Trotz dieses Erfolges und trotz der schweren Verluste der Franzosen sah sich die Abteilung Jung bald darauf
gezwungen, Wesso zu verlassen, da aus der Gegend von Nola starke französische Streitkräfte gemeldet wurden.
Jung zog von Wesso nach Molundu.

[ . . . ]

Bemerkenswert ist auch die Art der Kriegsführung der Franzosen im südöstlichen Teil Kameruns. Dort haben sie
wehrlose Flussdampfer der Kameruner Schifffahrtsgesellschaft ohne weiteres beschossen. Darüber gibt folgender
Privatbericht Aufschluss:

Am 18. Juli d. Js. war ich in Kinshassa angekommen und bekam Order, am 22. Juli mit dem Dampfer `Djah´ eine
Reise als Passagier zu meiner Orientierung über die Fahrt und zum Anfertigen einer Karte des Ssangafluß anzutreten.
Die Reise verlief ohne nennenswerte Zwischenfälle, abgesehen davon, dass wegen des außergewöhnlich geringen
Wasserstandes des Ssanga die Reise nur äußerst langsam vonstatten gehen konnte. Auf der Talfahrt wurde uns
schon immer von den Eingeborenen von einem großen „Palaver“ der Weißen erzählt; doch legten wir, Kapitän
Quadbeck
, der Führer der `Djah´, und ich, diesen Gerüchten keine Bedeutung bei, da bei den Schwarzen ja alle
Augenblicke solche Neuigkeiten auftauchen.

In der Nähe von Pikunda trafen wir den Dampfer `Bonga´ mit dem Postenführer von Bonga, Mellenthin, und einem
anderen deutschen Herren aus Bonga an Bord. Diese erzählten uns, dass sie vor einer bewaffneten Expedition, die
mit Kanonen von einem französischen Dampfer aus Bonga beschossen hätte, die Flucht stromaufwärts ergriffen
hätten.

Da die Herren auf die Frage, ob Krieg ausgebrochen sei, sehr ungenau waren, zumal sie keinerlei Nachricht von
Weißen bekommen hatten, so entschloss sich Herr Quadbeck, mit der `Djah´, vorsichtig den Ssanga herunter-
zufahren, um erst einmal genauer zu erfahren, was sich ereignet habe. Denn die Annahme lag nahe, dass es sich
nur um einen Grenzkonflikt handelte, der – es waren seitdem etwa sieben Tage verflossen – vielleicht schon wieder
geregelt war.

In letzter Annahme wurden wir noch bestärkt durch die Aussagen von Schwarzen in verschiedenen Dörfern, die über-
einstimmend sagten, die Franzosen wären schon wieder nach Mossaka zurückgegangen. Als wir am Morgen des 18.
August uns der Einmündung des Likenzie-Kanals in den Ssanga näherten, kam plötzlich aus diesem Kanal der
Dampfer `Victor Largant´ der `Messageries Maritimes´ heraus und begann mit Kanonen auf die `Djah´ zu schießen.
Der Führer drehte sofort das Schiff, um zu fliehen; jedoch sahen wir dann zu beiden Seiten des Flusses französische
Tirailleurs in Schützenlinien mit angelegtem Gewehr stehen. Da absolut keine Waffe an Bord, und also an Widerstand
oder Flucht nicht zu denken war, ließ Herr Quadbeck das Schiff festmachen. Der Schiffsführer und ich wurden
Kriegsgefangene, die `Djah´ als Kriegsbeute erklärt.

Der ganze an Bord befindliche Proviantvorrat wurde von den Franzosen beschlagnahmt. Unsere Sachen wurden durchwühlt,
Uhren, Wertsachen uns alles, was sonst nicht gerade fest verschlossen war, wurde von den französischen Unteroffizieren
geraubt, so dass schließlich auf unser dringendes Ersuchen hin der Kommandant einen Posten bei unserem Gepäck aufstellte.

Wir sind dann nach Brazzaville ins Gefängnis für Schwarze gebracht und dort bis zum 24. September gefangen gehalten worden,
zusammen mit noch fünf Herren aus Südkamerun, Elefantenjägern und Kaufleuten. Die `Djah´ ist von den Franzosen zum
Spitalschiff gemacht und auf ihren Expeditionen gegen Molundu und Nola verwandt worden. Es waren 250 Senegalesen, 100
Weiße (Offiziere und Unteroffiziere), eine Mitrailleuse, ein 5-cm-Geschütz und drei 6-cm-Geschütze vorhanden. Am 24.
September wurde uns erklärt, dass wir entlassen wären, gegen Ehrenwort, nicht mehr gegen Frankreich und seine Verbündeten
zu kämpfen, dass wir aber gleichzeitig aus dem französischen sowie auch aus dem belgischen Kongo ausgewiesen wären.


Quelle:
Deutsches Kolonialblatt, Amtsblatt für die Schutzgebiete in Afrika und in der Südsee. Herausgegeben im Reichs-
Kolonialamt. XXVI. Jahrgang 1915. Der Krieg in den deutschen Schutzgebieten. Zweite Mitteilung. Seite 15 - 19.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

Return to “German Colonies and Overseas Expeditions”