Greek government 1940-1941

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vitos
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Greek government 1940-1941

Post by vitos » 08 Mar 2004 18:45

I cannot find much infos about the Greek Metaxas government 1940-1941
IF someone can give infos about members and activities of the Greek
government during 1940-1941 , would greatly appreciate
YOURS
VITOS

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Gyenes
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Posts: 238
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Location: United States of America

Post by Gyenes » 08 Mar 2004 23:07

I think it was Prince Regnet Paul who signed the treaty with Germany after they had conquered Greece. But I would agree Metaxas is quite distant in these times, don't hear much about him.

Globalization41
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4/18/41

Post by Globalization41 » 14 Mar 2004 22:37

Athens, The New York Times, Associated
Press,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: [Late Friday,
April 18, U.S. time]
Alexander Korizis,
Premier of Greece in the darkest hour of her
modern history, died suddenly Friday after
only 80 days as leader of this fighting nation.
He was 56-years old. ... The government
made only the bare announcement of his
"sudden death" and said his funeral would be
held Saturday at 1 P.M. The cause of death
was not disclosed. ... King George named
Kostas Kotzias, former military governor of
Athens, to form a new government, the Athens
News agency announced.

Athens, The New York Times, United Press,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: [Late Friday, April
18, U.S. time]
The Battle of Greece, an
official Greek spokesman said early Saturday,
was raging with "increasing intensity" along
the new Allied front as German tanks, infantry,
and massed dive-bombers smashed first at one
section of the line and then at another in an
effort to crash through. ... Latest dispatches
from the front told of a battle of terrible
savagery raging across mountains and valleys

with British, Australian, New Zealand, and
Greek troops standing stubbornly against the
rush of steel and fire and numerically superior
forces.

Cairo, Egypt, Wireless to The New York
Times,
Friday, April 18: In the North African
desert British patrols again inflicted heavy
losses on the apparently overextended Axis
forces,
British headquarters announced today.
Many Germans and Italians were killed or
wounded in hand-to-hand fighting [Thursday]
around Tobruk [Libya] and Solum [Egypt], and
many Axis vehicles were destroyed. [The
British claimed 872 enemy captured in two
days.]
... The Royal Air Force continued to
bomb and strafe truck concentrations, troops,
landing grounds, and stores in Libya. ... After
having pushed through miles of blocked,
blasted, or mined roads, South African troops
in Ethiopia finally were able to make contact
with Italian forces 14 miles south of the
important communications center of Dessye.
Whether the Italians would attempt to hold out
their was uncertain.

London, Special Cable to The New York
Times,
Friday, April 18, 1941: Yugoslavia
was crossed off Britain's list of effective allies
today, as many another little nation has been
crossed off since the war began. The nation
that heroic King Peter swung from the Axis
alliance to fighting position as a British ally
today went on the British blacklist. The Board
of Trade and Ministry of Economic Warfare
announced that Yugoslavia was regarded as
enemy-occupied territory and that accordingly
it was a punishable offense for any one to have
commercial, financial, or other dealings with
or for benefit of any person in the territory.
... As from today, said the statement,
Yugoslavia will be regarded as an enemy
destination for contraband purposes. All goods
of Yugoslav origin or ownership are liable to
seizure by Britain.


Washington, Special to The New York Times,
Friday, April 18, 1941: Regulations for the
administration of civilian work camps for
conscientious objectors, the first of which will
be opened about May 15, were issued today by
Brig. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, deputy director
of Selective Service. ... The first camp, in the
Patapsco State Forest, near Baltimore, will be
operated in conjunction with the National Park
Service and the Maryland Park Commission.
... The work program at each camp will be
carried on under the director of a project
superintendent, provided by the technical
agency of the government department charged
with the responsibility for it. The hours of
work on projects at any camp will be
determined by the [technical] agency, and
assignees will be subject to emergency calls on
any day or night at any hour for the purpose of
fighting forest fires or any other emergency
affecting life or property. No limitation is set
on the number of hours that an assignee may
be asked to work in any given day or week.
... The National Service Board, a voluntary
association of religious organizations,
is
responsible through the camp director for the
administration of each camp. ... Each camp
will have a resident physician. No uniforms
are prescribed for the objectors.
Mess at the
camps must conform to the standard for food
supplied to the Army and Navy. The camp
director may grant furloughs up to a limit of 30
days in any one year. ... Conscientious
objectors at these camps will receive no pay
for their services and they or their religious
groups will pay their own expenses, estimated
at $35 per man per month.

The International Situation, The New York
Times,
Through Friday, April 18, 1941: The
Allies fell back stubbornly to a new defense
line in Greece as German pressure along the
entire front continued. The British were said
to be holding firm around Mount Olympus at
the eastern end of the front, while in the
center, near Grevena, Allied forces were
reported to have thrown back the farthest Nazi
penetrations and temporarily relieved the threat
to the railhead at Kalabaka. Large Greek
forces were abandoning gains in Albania
and
hurrying south to rejoin the main Greek forces
before swift Reich drives from Yugoslavia
could cut them off. ... Beleaguered Greece
suffered a new blow -- the death of Premier
Korizis,
three months after that of Premier
General Metazas, under whose guidance Greek
forces threw back the attempted Italian
invasion. It has been announced that Kostas
Kotzias,
former Military Governor of Athens,
had been named new Premier. ... The advance
Axis forces in Libya are "exhausted" and have
stopped at the Egyptian border, British quarters
in Cairo reported. With the fleet bombarding
roads and troop and supply concentrations from
the sea, and the combined Royal and Australian
air forces blasting Axis troops from the skies,
British circles said, German-Italian divisions
have been badly disrupted. At Tobruk, it was
said, five Axis officers and 72 men had been
added to the many prisoners taken in the past
five days. Continued British progress in East
Africa also was reported.

In Washington President Roosevelt explained
his failure thus far to state his stand on
convoys as due to his belief that the American
public is not yet sufficiently aware of the
danger to this country, but he added it was
growing more aware daily. ... Senate Leader
Barkley
announced, on the authorization of
Secretary Knox and Admiral Stark, despite
rumors to the contrary, no United States naval
vessels had been used for convoy duty and no
orders for convoying had been given. ... On
Thursday night and early Friday, London
stated, Berlin underwent the heaviest air raid in
its history,
dealt by powerful new British
Short-Sterling four-motored bombers
unleashing a new-type high explosive. The Air
Ministry said "very substantial" damage had
been done, but that eight R.A.F. craft had
failed to return. ... Berlin military
headquarters asserted that violent German
attacks on the central Allied front in Greece

had pierced the junction of British-Greek lines
and had carried advance forces through British
positions in the Thessalian Mountains until they
were near Kalabaka. Approximately 17,000
prisoners have been captured, Berlin said. The
German drive, assisted by the arrival of troops
from Yugoslavia, was reported picking up
momentum hourly.

As Greek troops have retreated back into
Greece from Albania, Italian forces have
followed closely and now hold the entire
Albanian-Greek frontier from Perat to Lake
Presba, Italian military headquarters
announced. Fascist forces have also converged
at Ragusa on the Yugoslav Adriatic coast and
now control the entire Dalmatian shore, it was
added.

Berlin, Telephone to The New York Times,
By C. Brooks Peters, Friday, April 18, 1941:
Operating in the Greek theatre of war under
the direct command of their supreme leader,
Adolf Hitler, the German forces were believed
here tonight to have forced an important break
in the enemy's line of defense and to have
pushed their wedge between the main bodies of
the Greek and British forces. ... German units
were reported to have broken through the
British defenses
in the Thessalian Mountains,
and it was said the capture of Kalabaka was
imminent. They appeared to threaten directly
the strategically important Trikkala, a major
point in the line of communications between
Yanina and Larissa. If they advance eastward
in a pincer movement they would expose the
first-line British forces in the Mount Olympus
sector to encirclement. ... Once the German
forces had taken Kalabaka, they would be able
to operate on relatively flat terrain and to
employ to the best advantage their motorized
and tank units, the rapidity of whose
movements was unquestionably retarded by
mountain topography. The possibility would
then exist of advancing westward from
Trikkala and trapping part of the Greek forces
between the Albanian frontier and the Ionian
Sea.
... The High Command communique
declared merely that the battles in North
Greece were continuing to develop successfully
in spite of most difficult terrain and most
inclement weather,
as well as destruction of
numerous roadways. ... It was thought,
however, that the German advance was
beginning to gather momentum
again following
the first contact with the entrenched defenders
several days ago. ... More than 17,000
prisoners have been captured, it was officially
stated, and numerous cannon, 25 of which are
of the heavy caliber, taken. In addition, the
German command said, twelve British armored
reconnaissance automobiles have been
destroyed. ... With the capitulation of
Yugoslavia the Germans can now throw the
bulk of their forces that have been operating in
that theatre into the Greek conflict, while at the
same time employing the transportation
facilities of that land for supplies. The German
military potential for the fighting in Greece is
thought to be much superior to any force that
the British and Greeks can muster and supply.
... Should the Germans successfully conclude
their Greek campaign, it is said, the Greek
prisoners taken will immediately thereafter be
released as a special gesture on the part of
Herr Hitler.
It is emphasized in this
connection that in his proclamation issued the
day the Balkan campaign began Herr Hitler
explicitly asserted that the Reich was not
fighting in Greece against the Greek people but
against Britain.
... Informed quarters here
declared that the conclusion of the Greek
campaign would not mean the initiation of a
pause in military activity,
such as followed the
campaigns in Poland, Norway, and France.
The fighting in Greece, it was said, represents
only part of the campaign for the domination of
the Mediterranean. It may not, authoritative
quarters asserted, be considered as separate
from the action in North Africa, just as the
battle in the major theatre of war, the British
Isles, may be expected to continue unabated
until a final decision is reached.

London, The New York Times, United Press,
Fri., April 18, 1941: The weekly Economist,
analyzing Great Britain's new income taxes,
said today that under the new schedules none
of Britain's multi-millionaires would be able to
spend more than $28,000 annually.


[Stay tuned for late breaking war bulletins.
... Globalization41]


Last edited by Globalization41 on 24 Jul 2004 05:22, edited 2 times in total.

Globalization41
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Location: California

Germans Hammering British-Greek Lines in Unending Waves

Post by Globalization41 » 21 Mar 2004 08:34

London, United Press, The New York Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: The British and
Greeks started to withdraw to new defense
lines, believed to be 30 miles south of the
[previous] line based on Mount Olympus.
There has been no conformation here, as yet,
of the German claims that Olympus and Larissa
have been captured. ... It was said the Allied
troops are falling back slowly,
inflicting severe
losses on the Germans as they retire. The
British emphasized that the front was still
intact, although increasingly serious views are
entertained as to the ultimate outcome.


Athens, United Press, The New York Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: Greek and British
spokesmen reported tonight that the Allied
defenders of Greece were unshaken by fierce
German attacks.
... Greek morale was buoyed
up by word of successful Greek counterattacks
in the Grevena sector, at the center of the
front. ... The movement of Allied troops into
new, shorter defense lines was said to be
proceeding according to plan, with a
continuous front facing the Germans and troops
in contact at all points.

Cairo, Egypt, Special Cable to The New York
Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: The force of
the attack on the Greco-British front increased
greatly today, according to informed sources
here. The British front was nowhere
penetrated while British machine gun and
artillery fire is taking a huge toll of the
attackers.

Athens, Associated Press, The New York
Times,
Sunday, April 20, 1941: [Late
Saturday, U.S. time]
The Greek High
Command announced early today that the
Germans hammering in unending waves at the
British-Greek lines have "made a push toward
the south." ... This was the first indication
here in 24 hours that the Germans had gained
ground, both British and Greek reports up to
mid-afternoon yesterday saying the Allies were
holding fast against Nazi assaults. Just where
the German thrust was made or how far was
not disclosed. ... The Nazis are bringing up
heavy guns, a military informant said, to
supplement the constant hammering of their
Stukas [infantry supporting aircraft], coming
over 20 to 30 at a time. ... The Germans were
said to be using infantry by the tens of
thousands for the first time in the Balkan
campaign.
... On the left of the Olympus line
the Greeks were said to have been turning back
one thrust after another by Germans in the
important Kalabaka sector. ... On the
Albanian front, the Greek High Command said,
Greeks falling back before the Italians had
inflicted heavy casualties on the Fascists in
rear-guard actions.

The International Situation, The New York
Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: The German
High Command claimed Saturday that the
swastika now flew over the crest of Mount
Olympus
in Greece. German armored
divisions forced the passes to the west of the
peak, the High Command said, and reached the
important junction of Larissa. Informed Berlin
circles predicted the fall of Greece was near
and said that the Nazi air force was constantly
disrupting traffic to the south of the Allied
lines in the hope of hampering any retreat. ...
The Allies, it became evident, were being
slowly forced back before the crushing
numerical superiority of German divisions.

London did not specify a withdrawal from
Mount Olympus, but British quarters said that
their forces and the Greeks were withdrawing
to a new defense line some 30 miles to the
south, and the Greek High Command
acknowledged that the German troops were
advancing southward. ... Indicating that a full
program of military action was in prospect,
Reichsfuehrer Hitler said in a proclamation on
the eve of his 52nd birthday that "a heavy year
of combat stands before us."
Then he asked
the German people to contribute more heavily
than ever before to the care of wounded
soldiers.
... Athens announced that King
George II
had assumed personal command of
the Greek State following the death of Premier
Korizis
which, it was officially announced, had
been a suicide induced by the Premier's
extreme mental depression over the growing
threat to Greek independence. ...
Apprehension over the Allied position in
Greece was also felt by the British Government
and was indicated by editorials in the London
press
emphasizing the superiority of the
Germans in numbers and suggesting that
eventually the British forces would have to
withdraw from the Greek peninsula. The
British position in Africa however, it was
pointed out, has materially improved. ... The
Russian Government once again chilled Allied
hopes that friction might develop between the
U.S.S.R. and the Axis.
Speaking through the
controlled press, the Soviet said that the recent
accord with Japan
had not been aimed at
Germany and that it was, instead, a
bewildering blow at Anglo-American interests
seeking strife between Russia and the Axis
powers. It was revealed, nevertheless, that
Russia had declined to become an Axis partner
last November.
... London suffered another
sharp German air raid Saturday night, but its
intensity was less than that of Wednesday
night, reports from the British capital
indicated. Nazi raiders flew low in clouds,
their hardest bombing being relatively brief.
... The arrival of a strong British force at the
port of Basra, Iraq, was announced by London.
This was taken as an indication that the British
Government was moving fast to forestall Axis
activity in Iraq,
following an allegedly pro-
Axis coup there. The new government is
cooperating with British forces. ... A meeting
between President Roosevelt and Canada's
Prime Minister Mackenzie King will take place
Sunday in the quiet of the Hudson Valley it
was announced. Although no indication was
given of the subjects to be discussed, it was
pointed out that the shipment of U.S. arms to
Canadian ports,
the use of newly acquired
bases in Greenland, and financial aid are
matters now pending between the two
countries.

Berlin, United Press, The New York Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: It was insisted here
today that German forces were making
sweeping advances all along the Greek front
from positions just southeast of Albania to the
Aegean Sea. But it was stated with equal
emphasis that there had been no breakthrough
of Allied defenses and that rear-guard actions
were occurring at all points of Nazi advance.
... The High Command noted that the advances
were being made in fighting with the British
rear guard. There was some reserve in
predicting when German force of arms might
bring the Greek campaign to an end.
However, there was widespread hope that this
might be achieved as speedily as other German
military operations.
... Military quarters here
are inclined to the belief that the third defense
line of the Allied forces probably was located
on the Othrys Ridge, a little more that 100
miles from Athens, by highway. ... A Nazi
threat to the Allied defenses was building up
rapidly in the western sector south of the
Albanian frontier
along the highway that leads
from Yanina to Arta. Heavy bombardment of
long Greek columns hastily pulled out of
Albania was said to be in progress along this
route. ... German informants here believe that
Arta probably would be the western hinge of
the new defense line. Arta is about 80 miles
west of Lamia, slightly to the north. The
sector east of Arta is protected by the southern
extension of the Pindus mountain range, a
north-south chain that roughly parallels the
Yanina-Arta highway. There is only a narrow
gap between the south end of Pindus
Mountains and the western end of the Othrys
chain. This gap comes down from Kalabaka
and Trikkala which have been heavily attacked
by the Germans. ... The High Command said
today that Nazi troops were pushing ahead just
northeast of the head of the Pindus range,
apparently moving up behind the heavy
bombardment of retiring Greek troops on the
Yanina-Arta highway. ... The German thrust
also was said to be moving ahead past Larissa,
but there is no indication of the depth of
advance. There was no detailed report on
action in the Kalabaka-Trikkala area, but it was
presumed that allied retirement was in progress
there, since this has become a dangerously
exposed salient due to the thrust in the Larissa
region. ... ... Cairo, Egypt, Special Cable to
The New York Times,
Sat., April 19, 1941:
German radio reports of violent demonstrations
by Egyptian Nationalists
here appear to be
founded on wishful thinking. No such anti-
British manifestations have been seen, and it is
noted that many Egyptians are growing more
suspicious and fearful of Germany now that
German troops are at the Egyptian border.

Berlin, By Telephone to The New York
Times,
By C. Brooks Peters, Sat., April 19:
After overcoming in some four days of fighting
the tactical advantages afforded to a defending
army by the mountainous topography of
Northern Greece,
the German forces operating
in this Mediterranean theatre are said here
again to have got their advance into high gear.
... Statements made in Berlin tonight declare
that the British and Greeks are in a rapid
retreat
along a wide front before the pursuing
onslaught of the German motorized units but
suggest in addition that a Greek capitulation --
similar to that of the Belgians in Flanders last
Spring -- may not be excluded as a possibility.
... The Allied front is said to have been broken
at strategically vital points, extending from the
mountainous terrain northeast of the Pindus
Mountains
to the Aegean Sea. It is officially
reported, moreover, that the German war flag
is flying from the pinnacle of Mount Olympus,

having been hoisted there by German Alpine
troops.
... The communique of the German
High Command is nonetheless reticent about
the speed with which the German forces are
advancing. It would not be surprising,
however, if over the weekend, perhaps
tomorrow, on Adolf Hitler's birthday, a more
comprehensive exposition of German successes
in Greece were to be released by the Army
Command. ... The German forces are reported
by the German High Command to have
attacked Mount Olympus from both sides. The
"rear guard of the British main forces" was
thrown back, the German communique adds,
the southern pass through the mountains
forced, and the important communications
junction of Larissa, on the Plain of Thessaly,
captured. It is admitted here that the British
resistance in North Greece has been stubborn.
It required "hard fighting," the D.N.B., the
official news agency declares, to throw the
Allies out of the strongly armed and protected
mountain passes.
When the British had to
retire from the mountain passes and along the
serpentine paths, which were covered by
artillery, D.N.B. adds, they endeavored,
nevertheless, vainly to halt the German
advance by blowing up bridges and paths. ...
The German Air Force, and particularly dive
bombers,
it is asserted, in spite of bad weather,
officially is reported to have assisted the
operations of the ground forces by bombing
retreating Allied columns
in the Larissa sector
and attacking the road connecting Yanina and
Arta, along which strong Allied units were
retreating southward.
... German bombers, the
General Headquarters communique declares,
attacked and destroyed several Allied transports
in the harbor of Chalcis and in the Gulf of
Corinth.
Altogether, the communique adds,
29,000 tons of enemy shipping were destroyed
there and a number of other merchantmen hit.
Five Allied airplanes are said further to have
been set afire while still on the ground on
Greek airfields. The official news agency
declares that German bombers attacked vessels
in the Bay of Volo and destroyed a ship of
6,000 tons with a direct hit amidships.

Cairo, Egypt, Special Cable to The New York
Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: [In a
skirmish near the Egyptian-Libyan border]
A
company of Hussars [elite British imperial
troops]
was unofficially reported to have wired
this message to headquarters: "We have
captured or killed every German we have seen.
Please send us more."

Tokyo, Wireless to The New York Times, By
Otto D. Tolischus, Saturday, April 19, 1941:
In preparation for the "positive foreign policy"
that is expected to be inaugurated following the
return of Foreign Minister Yosuke Matsuoka
on Tuesday, Premier Prince Fumimaro Konoye
and his economic ministers emphasized anew
today the urgent need for the construction of a
"high degree defense state" to expand the
production of war materials.
... From their
pronouncements it appears the "high degree
defense state" proposes, in the words of the
Commerce and Industry Minister, Vice
Admiral Tijer Toyoda,
"to mobilize capital,
material, labor, electric power, and all
production power" on the principle of priority
for war-time industries. ... This priority is to
be enforced by the expansion of government
control,
but the control is to be wielded on a
practical basis through the important industries
themselves on the basis of self-discipline and
the "leader principle." ... In a message to the
council of the important industrial
organizations, which met today to expand its
structure, Prince Konoye appealed for
"wholehearted cooperation with government."
His message was backed by the War Minister,
Lieut. Gen. Eiki Tojo,
and Navy Minister,
Admiral Koshiro Oikawa,
who emphasized that
"the current situation both at home and abroad
urgently demands a highly organized defense
system, which again depends in great measure
on speedy expansion of the nation's productive
capacity." ... To impress officials with the
gravity of the matter, Admiral Toyoda
announced that he had invited the chiefs of the
military and naval affairs bureaus to come to
his Ministry to give its members an
unvarnished picture of the actual situation.
Officials of the Commerce and Industry
Ministry did not always see eye to eye with
their former chief, Ichizo Kobayashi whom
Admiral Toyoda replaced. ... At the same
time Admiral Toyoda announced that while the
government would try to make the best
possible use of small and medium sized
industries he said, "I am afraid it will become
impossible to maintain them in their present
disorganized condition and that it will be
necessary for them to be readjusted and unified
on a rational basis
as fast as possible." ...
Admiral Toyoda further said that while "the
maintenance of a low price policy is absolutely
necessary for the conduct of war-time economy
and stabilization of living conditions,
nevertheless the increased production of basic
materials is one of the most urgent necessities
of the moment." He hinted this increased
production must be attained by appropriate
price adjustments. ... Masatsuna Ogura,
Minister without Portfolio, in addressing the
Control Council, stressed that his ambition was
to give a practical basis for the government's
control measures. He assured the industrialists
that "if powerful industrial organizations are
established with the closest cooperation
between the people and the government, and if
they can be relied on for effective control of
production and distribution,
details of the
control can be left to them and the government
will merely exercise supervision of the output."
... ... The New York Times, April 19: A
bankers' committee to assist in raising money
for the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund of
the United States of America, 515 Madison
Ave.,
has been formed, it was [reported Sat.].

Bucharest, Rumania, By Telephone to The
New York Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941:
Civil servants henceforth will not be permitted
to marry foreigners. Anyone who do so will
be put on the retired list immediately. Any
who marry Jews will be summarily dismissed.


Cairo, Egypt, Special to The New York
Times,
Saturday, April 19, 1941: The land
fighting in North Africa was confined to patrol
actions, with British detachments in Tobruk
and Solum areas harassing Axis forces, British
headquarters announced today. ... Near
Solum, in Egypt near the Libyan border, a
British mobil column attacked an Axis convoy
and destroyed several trucks and an armored
car. ... Axis mechanized units and troop units
in Eastern Libya were attacked unceasingly by
British fliers. Several ammunition trucks and
other vehicles were destroyed.

[Stay tuned for late breaking war bulletins.
... Globalization41.]

User avatar
Steve
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Posts: 933
Joined: 03 Aug 2002 01:58
Location: United Kingdom

Post by Steve » 10 May 2004 19:49

"Since 1936 Greece had been ruled by a dictator, General Metaxis, who was disliked both by the Royalists and the Venizelists (pro British liberals). He had strong German sympathies and copied Nazi methods; political parties were disbanded; dissenters from the regime were imprisoned, exiled, or shot; elections were suspended; the press was heavily censored. The Chair of Constitutional Law at Athens University was abolished, and in many areas municipal government was suspended. The Asfalia, a secret police force similar to the Gestapo, was established, and the Hitler Jugend imitated by the introduction of the Ethniki Neolea."

From an article by Edwin Packer.

User avatar
Rodolfo Graziani
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Joined: 12 Jun 2004 10:25
Location: Gran America (qualche giorno)

Post by Rodolfo Graziani » 24 Jul 2004 03:05

http://www.ethniko.info/metaxas/

This is a Metaxas website if anyone was looking for anymore more information.

Globalization41
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Posts: 1299
Joined: 13 Mar 2002 02:52
Location: California

Metaxas

Post by Globalization41 » 24 Jul 2004 07:51


vitos
Member
Posts: 20
Joined: 21 Jan 2004 15:34
Location: Russia Sochi

GENERAL PAPAGOS ARREST IN APRIL 1941

Post by vitos » 29 Jul 2004 22:38

I' m interesting in creal reasons of General PAPAGOS ARREST in april 1941 and also about coup d'etat of general TSOLAKOGLOU

Globalization41
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Posts: 1299
Joined: 13 Mar 2002 02:52
Location: California

Athens under the Swastika

Post by Globalization41 » 30 Jul 2004 06:35

I'm generally not familiar with Greek history
except in the context of the overall global
strategic situation in 1941. Follows are links
I looked up trying to familiarize myself with
Vitos's above question.

Athens under the Swastika

General Papagos

Time Magazine Cover: Papagos

General Tsolakoglou and German Invasion

Globalization41

vitos
Member
Posts: 20
Joined: 21 Jan 2004 15:34
Location: Russia Sochi

government 1941

Post by vitos » 15 Aug 2004 22:08

STRUCTURE OF GOVERNMENT OF GREECE
29.1.1941 -20.4.1941


I hope for translation of the collegues from GREECE


KYΒΕΡΝΗΣΙΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ ΚΟΡΙΖΗ

(De Facto)

Από 29.1.1941 έως 20.4.1941

29 Ιανουαρίου 1941: Διορισμός:

ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ ΚΟΡΙΖΗ Προέδρου Υπουργικού Συμβουλίου, Υπουργού Εξωτερικών, Παιδείας, Στρατιω-τικών,    Ναυτικών,   Αεροπορίας.
ΑΓΗ ΤΑΜΠΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υπουργού  Δικαιοσύνης
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΔΟΥΡΕΝΤΗ Υπουργού Εσωτερικών
ΑΝΔΡΕΟΥ ΑΠΟΣΤΟΛΙΔΟΥ Υπουργού  Οικονομικών
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΑΡΒΑΝΙΤΗ Υπουργού  Εθνικής  Οικονομίας
ΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΟΥ Υπουργού Συγκοινωνίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΥ Υπουργού Γεωργίας
ΗΛΙΑ ΚΡΙΜΠΑ Υπουργού  Εθνικής Προνοίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΑΪΔΗ Υπουργού  Σιδηροδρόμων και Αυτοκινήτων
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΚΟΤΖΙΑ Υπουργού Διοικητού Πρωτευούσης
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΠΟΡΜΠΟΥΛΗ Υφυπουργού παρά τω Πρωθυπουργώ
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΣΠΕΝΤΖΑ Υφυπουργού  Θρησκευμάτων και Παιδείας
ΣΤ. ΠΟΛΥΖΩΓΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Συγκοινωνίας
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΠΑΠΑΔΗΜΑ Υφυπουργού  Στρατιωτικών
ΙΠΠ. ΠΑΠΑΒΑΣΙΛΕΙΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Ναυτικών
Π. ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΑΚΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Αεροπορίας
Α. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Εργασίας
Χ. ΑΛΙΒΙΖΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Συνεταιρισμών
ΘΕΟΔΩΡΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΟΥΔΗ Υφυπουργού  Τύπου και Τουρισμού
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΖΑΦΕΙΡΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Αγορανομίας
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΑΝΙΑΔΑΚΗ Υφυπουργού Δημοσίας Ασφαλείας
Α. ΤΖΙΦΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εμπορικής Ναυτιλίας
Μ. ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εθνικής Οικονομίας
17 Απριλίου 1941: Παραίτησις:
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΜΗ Υπουργού  Γενικού Διοικητού Μακεδονίας
ΕΥΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΚΑΛΑΝΤΖΗ Υφυπουρού Γενικού Διοικητού Θράκης

20 Απριλίου 1941: Παραίτησις:[1]

ΑΓΗ ΤΑΜΠΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υπουργού  Δικαιοσύνης
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΔΟΥΡΕΝΤΗ Υπουργού Εσωτερικών
ΑΝΔΡΕΟΥ ΑΠΟΣΤΟΛΙΔΟΥ Υπουργού  Οικονομικών
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΑΡΒΑΝΙΤΗ Υπουργού  Εθνικής  Οικονομίας
ΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΟΥ Υπουργού Συγκοινωνίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΥ Υπουργού  Γεωργίας
ΗΛΙΑ ΚΡΙΜΠΑ Υπουργού  Εθνικής Προνοίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΑΪΔΗ Υπουργού  Σιδηροδρόμων και Αυτοκινήτων
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΚΟΤΖΙΑ Υπουργού Διοικητού Πρωτευούσης
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΠΟΡΜΠΟΥΛΗ Υφυπουργού παρά τω Πρωθυπουργώ
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΣΠΕΝΤΖΑ Υφυπουργού  Θρησκευμάτων και Παιδείας
ΣΤ. ΠΟΛΥΖΩΓΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Συγκοινωνίας
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΠΑΠΑΔΗΜΑ Υφυπουργού  Στρατιωτικών
ΙΠΠ. ΠΑΠΑΒΑΣΙΛΕΙΟΥ Υφυπουργού Ναυτικών
Π. ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΑΚΟΥ Υφυπουργού Αεροπορίας
Α. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Εργασίας
Χ. ΑΛΙΒΙΖΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού Συνεταιρισμών
ΘΕΟΔΩΡΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΟΥΔΗ Υφυπουργού Τύπου και Τουρισμού
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΖΑΦΕΙΡΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Αγορανομίας
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΑΝΙΑΔΑΚΗ Υφυπουργού Δημοσίας Ασφαλείας
Α. ΤΖΙΦΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εμπορικής Ναυτιλίας
Μ. ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εθνικής Οικονομίας

ΑΝΑΘΕΣΕΙΣ

11 Μαρτίου 1941: Ανάθεσις εις:
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΚΟΤΖΙΑΝ (Υπουργόν Διοικητήν Πρωτευούσης) καθηκόντων Γενικού  Διοικητού Θράκης




[1]Την 19-4-1941 θάνατος του Πρωθυπουργού Αλέξανδρου Κοριζή.

vitos
Member
Posts: 20
Joined: 21 Jan 2004 15:34
Location: Russia Sochi

government 1941

Post by vitos » 15 Aug 2004 22:08

STRUCTURE OF GOVERNMENT OF GREECE
29.1.1941 -20.4.1941


I hope for translation of the collegues from GREECE


KYΒΕΡΝΗΣΙΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ ΚΟΡΙΖΗ

(De Facto)

Από 29.1.1941 έως 20.4.1941

29 Ιανουαρίου 1941: Διορισμός:

ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ ΚΟΡΙΖΗ Προέδρου Υπουργικού Συμβουλίου, Υπουργού Εξωτερικών, Παιδείας, Στρατιω-τικών,    Ναυτικών,   Αεροπορίας.
ΑΓΗ ΤΑΜΠΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υπουργού  Δικαιοσύνης
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΔΟΥΡΕΝΤΗ Υπουργού Εσωτερικών
ΑΝΔΡΕΟΥ ΑΠΟΣΤΟΛΙΔΟΥ Υπουργού  Οικονομικών
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΑΡΒΑΝΙΤΗ Υπουργού  Εθνικής  Οικονομίας
ΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΟΥ Υπουργού Συγκοινωνίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΥ Υπουργού Γεωργίας
ΗΛΙΑ ΚΡΙΜΠΑ Υπουργού  Εθνικής Προνοίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΑΪΔΗ Υπουργού  Σιδηροδρόμων και Αυτοκινήτων
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΚΟΤΖΙΑ Υπουργού Διοικητού Πρωτευούσης
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΠΟΡΜΠΟΥΛΗ Υφυπουργού παρά τω Πρωθυπουργώ
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΣΠΕΝΤΖΑ Υφυπουργού  Θρησκευμάτων και Παιδείας
ΣΤ. ΠΟΛΥΖΩΓΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Συγκοινωνίας
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΠΑΠΑΔΗΜΑ Υφυπουργού  Στρατιωτικών
ΙΠΠ. ΠΑΠΑΒΑΣΙΛΕΙΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Ναυτικών
Π. ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΑΚΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Αεροπορίας
Α. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Εργασίας
Χ. ΑΛΙΒΙΖΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Συνεταιρισμών
ΘΕΟΔΩΡΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΟΥΔΗ Υφυπουργού  Τύπου και Τουρισμού
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΖΑΦΕΙΡΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Αγορανομίας
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΑΝΙΑΔΑΚΗ Υφυπουργού Δημοσίας Ασφαλείας
Α. ΤΖΙΦΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εμπορικής Ναυτιλίας
Μ. ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εθνικής Οικονομίας
17 Απριλίου 1941: Παραίτησις:
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΜΗ Υπουργού  Γενικού Διοικητού Μακεδονίας
ΕΥΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΚΑΛΑΝΤΖΗ Υφυπουρού Γενικού Διοικητού Θράκης

20 Απριλίου 1941: Παραίτησις:[1]

ΑΓΗ ΤΑΜΠΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υπουργού  Δικαιοσύνης
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΔΟΥΡΕΝΤΗ Υπουργού Εσωτερικών
ΑΝΔΡΕΟΥ ΑΠΟΣΤΟΛΙΔΟΥ Υπουργού  Οικονομικών
ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ ΑΡΒΑΝΙΤΗ Υπουργού  Εθνικής  Οικονομίας
ΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΟΥ Υπουργού Συγκοινωνίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΥ Υπουργού  Γεωργίας
ΗΛΙΑ ΚΡΙΜΠΑ Υπουργού  Εθνικής Προνοίας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΑΪΔΗ Υπουργού  Σιδηροδρόμων και Αυτοκινήτων
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΚΟΤΖΙΑ Υπουργού Διοικητού Πρωτευούσης
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΠΟΡΜΠΟΥΛΗ Υφυπουργού παρά τω Πρωθυπουργώ
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΣΠΕΝΤΖΑ Υφυπουργού  Θρησκευμάτων και Παιδείας
ΣΤ. ΠΟΛΥΖΩΓΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Συγκοινωνίας
ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΠΑΠΑΔΗΜΑ Υφυπουργού  Στρατιωτικών
ΙΠΠ. ΠΑΠΑΒΑΣΙΛΕΙΟΥ Υφυπουργού Ναυτικών
Π. ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΑΚΟΥ Υφυπουργού Αεροπορίας
Α. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού  Εργασίας
Χ. ΑΛΙΒΙΖΑΤΟΥ Υφυπουργού Συνεταιρισμών
ΘΕΟΔΩΡΟΥ ΝΙΚΟΛΟΥΔΗ Υφυπουργού Τύπου και Τουρισμού
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΖΑΦΕΙΡΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Αγορανομίας
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΜΑΝΙΑΔΑΚΗ Υφυπουργού Δημοσίας Ασφαλείας
Α. ΤΖΙΦΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εμπορικής Ναυτιλίας
Μ. ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Υφυπουργού Εθνικής Οικονομίας

ΑΝΑΘΕΣΕΙΣ

11 Μαρτίου 1941: Ανάθεσις εις:
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΚΟΤΖΙΑΝ (Υπουργόν Διοικητήν Πρωτευούσης) καθηκόντων Γενικού  Διοικητού Θράκης




[1]Την 19-4-1941 θάνατος του Πρωθυπουργού Αλέξανδρου Κοριζή.

vitos
Member
Posts: 20
Joined: 21 Jan 2004 15:34
Location: Russia Sochi

government 1941

Post by vitos » 15 Aug 2004 22:13

KYBEΡΝΗΣΙΣ ΕΜΜΑΝΟΥΗΛ ΤΣΟΥΔΕΡΟΥ

(De Facto)

Από 20.4.1941 έως 2.6.1941

20 Απριλίου 1941: Διορισμός:

ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ  ΣΑΚΕΛΛΑΡΙΟΥ Αντιπροέδρου Υπουργικού Συμβουλίου και Υπουργού Ναυτικών
ΕΜΜΑΝΟΥΗΛ  ΤΣΟΥΔΕΡΟΥ Υπουργού Εξωτερικών και προσωρινώς Οικονομικών και Εθνικής Οικονομίας
Θ. ΝΙΚΟΛΟΥΔΗ Υπουργού Εθνικής Προνοίας και Υφυπουργού Τύπου και Τουρισμού
ΚΩΝ/ΝΟΥ  ΜΑΝΙΑΔΑΚΗ Υπουργού Εσωτερικών και Υφυπουργού Δημοσίας Ασφαλείας
ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΥ ΚΟΡΤΖΑ Υπουργού Συγκοινωνίας και προσωρινώς Σιδηροδρόμων και Αυτοκινήτων
ΕΥΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΣΕΚΕΡΗ Υπουργού Παιδείας και Θρησκευμάτων και προσωρινώς Δικαιοσύνης
ΑΡ. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΤΟΥ Υπουργού Γεωργίας και Υφυπουργού Εργασίας και Συνεταιρισμών
Π.  ΠΑΝΑΓΑΚΟΥ Υπουργού Στρατιωτικών και προσωρινώς Υφυπουργού  Αγορανομίας
Π.  ΝΙΚΟΛΑΪΔΗ Υπουργού Αεροπορίας
ΣΤ. ΘΕΟΦΑΝΙΔΗ Υφυπουργού Εμπορικής Ναυτιλίας

20 Απριλίου 1941: Παραίτησις:

Ν. ΜΑΥΡΟΥΔΗ Μονίμου Υφυπουργού Εξωτερικών

21  Απριλίου 1941: Διορισμός:

ΕΜΜΑΝΟΥΗΛ  ΤΣΟΥΔΕΡΟΥ Προέδρου Υπουργικού Συμβουλίου, Υπουργού Εξωτερικών και προσωρινώς Οικονομικών και Εθνικής Οικονομίας
ΣΤΥΛΙΑΝΟΥ  ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΚΑΚΗ Υπουργού Δικαιοσύνης

21 Απριλίου 1941: Παραίτησις:

Π.   ΣΦΑΚΙΑΝΑΚΗ Υπουργού Γενικού Διοικητού Κρήτης

24 Απριλίου 1941: Παραίτησις:

Π. ΠΑΝΑΓΑΚΟΥ Υπουργού Στρατιωτικών και Υφυπουργού Αγορανομίας

25  Απριλίου 1941: Διορισμός:

Π. ΑΡΓΥΡΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ Γενικού Διοικητού Νήσων Αιγαίου

26  Απριλίου 1941: Διορισμός:

ΕΜΜΑΝΟΥΗΛ ΤΣΟΥΔΕΡΟΥ (Προέδρου Υπουργικού Συμβουλίου, Υπουργού Εξωτερικών, Οικονομικών, και Εθνικής Οικονομίας) προσωρινώς ως Υπουργού  Στρατιωτικών
ΚΩΝ/ΝΟΥ  ΜΑΝΙΑΔΑΚΗ (Υπουργού Εσωτερικών και Υφυπουργού Δημοσίας. Ασφαλείας) και προσωρινώς ως Υφυπουργού Αγορανομίας

14 Μαϊου 1941: Παραίτησις:

ΕΜΜΑΝΟΥΗΛ ΤΣΟΥΔΕΡΟΥ (Προέδρου Υπουργικού Συμβουλίου), Υπουργού Στρατιωτικών

14 Μαϊου 1941: Διορισμός:

ΕΜΜ. ΤΖΑΝΑΚΑΚΗ Υπουργού Στατιωτικών

ΑΝΑΘΕΣΕΙΣ

26 Μαϊου 1941: Ανάθεσις εις:

ΑΛΕΞ. ΣΑΚΕΛΛΑΡΙΟΥ (Αντιπροέδρον Κυβερνήσεως και Υπουργόν Ναυτικών) προσωρινώς καθηκόντων Υφυπουργού Εμπορικής Ναυτιλίας
ΣΤΥΛ. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΚΑΚΗΝ (Υπουργόν Δικαιοσύνης) προσωρινώς καθηκόντων Υπουργού Εσωτερικών, Υφυπουργού Δημοσίας Ασφαλείας και Αγορανομίας

12 Μαΐου 1941: Ανάθεσις εις:

ΣΤΥΛ. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΑΚΗΝ (Υπουργόν Δικαιοσύνης), προσωρινώς καθηκόντων  Υπουργού Προνοίας, και Υπουργού Συγκοινωνίας, Σιδηροδρόμων και Αυτοκινήτων και Εθνικής Παιδείας και Υφυπουργού Τύπου

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