British Bombers Blast Bremen

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Globalization41
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British Bombers Blast Bremen

Post by Globalization41 » 05 Jul 2004 09:32

London, Special to The New York Times,
By David Anderson, Monday, July 14, 1941:
[Late Sunday, U.S. time] Bremen was attacked
early Sunday morning by Royal Air Force
bombers that dodged thunderstorms to pound
the big Reich port with high explosive missiles,
some of which the Air Ministry said were
"exceptionally heavy." ... Two of the British
planes failed to return from the raid
that
embraced "objectives elsewhere in Northwest
Germany." One of those returning had scars
showing it had been hit by Nazi anti-aircraft
fire more than 20 times.
... Concentrating
their major night offensive on Bremen for the
eighth time in a month, the Bomber Command
planes picked out shipbuilding yards and
factories
along the River Weser for most
careful attention. They were raiding into the
Reich for the 32nd night in a row. ... The
pilot of the much-hit plane related how he had
made several runs over the area to give his
crew a chance to get a sure aim. ... The
German ground guns put up a stiff defense, but
the R.A.F. fliers reported it was not as serious
an opposition as the weather. ... Navigation
from the time the planes left England behind
them in the darkness was always difficult they
said. Compasses developed errors in the
electric storms
and clouds were laden with cold
air that iced the wings and made propellers
erratic.
One part of the flight of R.A.F.
squadrons climbed to 15,000 feet without
finding good conditions. ... The Germans'
long-range guns opened fire across the Strait of
Dover
before dawn Sunday, apparently shelling
a convoy. Several bursts of four and two-gun
salvoes brought residents of the Kentish coast
from their homes in nightclothes. They could
see the flashes from guns on the French shore.
... A few Nazi raiders flew over Britain during
Sunday night, dropping some bombs in the
coastal areas of Southeast and East England.
They caused no damage or casualties, officials
said. Sunday night two German bombers were
destroyed over Britain. Single planes bombed
a town in the Midlands, another on the
southeast, and a third on the south coast. ...
The Air Ministry released the strange story of
four British fliers who spent eight and a half
days floating in a rubber dinghy after their
bomber had failed to get back from a raid on
Duesseldorf the night of July 1st. ... All other
aircraft of their squadron returning from their
raid passed over their heads and during the
ensuing days more R.A.F. planes came close
without sighting them. Finally they attracted
the attention of a Hampden bomber by flashing
signals with mirrors. The men had the
misfortune to be without flares that worked.
They had no compass and little in the line of
rations. Moreover, they had come down over
a minefield
that was avoided by surface craft.

Reykjavik, Iceland, United Press, The New
York Times,
Sunday, July 13, 1941: United
States soldiers, sailors, and Marines are having
a hard time finding public amusements in this
capital of 40,000 persons. ... Wine shops in
Iceland are state owned and liquor can be
purchased with tickets issued only to Icelanders
and during restricted hours. However, the
Americans have managed to obtain drinks
here and there. ... Since the occupation
of this strategic North Atlantic island
by the
United States, music halls, and other places
have been offering only classical shows.
The town's only movie house, currently
showing "Golden Boy," is patronized nightly
by uniformed troops. ... Socially the
Americans are getting along well with the
Icelanders, whose only previous knowledge of
the United States was gathered mostly from
movies and newspaper accounts, with gangsters
a major topic. ... The Marines seem to be the
favorites with the Icelandic girls, who make no
attempt to hide their admiration for the trim
Marine uniforms. ... With no Army, Navy, or
air force and only a few coastal inspection
ships, military discipline has been unknown to
Icelanders. In view of their lack of knowledge
of Americans there was some doubt how the
Americans there would compare with British
troops, but scenes on the streets and in the
shops give evidence that numerous American-
Icelandic friendships already have been
established, as well as camaraderie between
the American and British forces. ... Having
already considerably increased their knowledge
of the English language through the British
occupying forces, the Icelanders, particularly
the storekeepers, have solved any language
difficulties the Americans might have had.
However, they have occasional trouble with the
American's accents and use of slang. ... The
Americans tour the stores and curio shops
during the day buying souvenirs and postal
cards to send home, including hand-made silk
handkerchiefs bearing the word "Iceland"
embroidered by Icelandic girls. The postoffice
is crowded all day by soldiers sending cards
and packages home. ... All stores exchange
seven Icelandic kroner to the dollar, which is
enough to buy two good meals or three good
seats at the movie or three packages of
American cigarettes. ... A minor problem
caused by the arrival of the Americans is
whether Icelanders shall drive on the right or
left side of the road. When automobiles first
were introduced here the right-hand rule was
established. Then the British came and the
regulations were changed. Now scores of
American vehicles are using the right side of
the road, causing some confusion and anxiety.

Lisbon, Portugal, Associated Press, The New
York Times,
Sunday, July 13, 1941: A British
military plane exploded today and crashed into
the sea off the north coast of Portugal, it was
reported tonight. All members of the crew
were believed lost. A tug that put out from
Viana do Castelo could find only a few floating
bits of wreckage and one body attached to a
parachute.

[Stay tuned for late breaking war bulletins.
... Globalization41.]

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