Tieflader für Panzerkampfwagen

Discussions on the vehicles used by the Axis forces. Hosted by Christian Ankerstjerne
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Christoph Awender
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Tieflader für Panzerkampfwagen

Post by Christoph Awender » 04 Dec 2002 23:07

Hello!

Again I need the help of the community. During the work on my KStN charts I sometimes have problems to determine the correct vehicles/trailers.

In a Panzerwerkstattkompanie KStN 1187 (5.10.1937) there are 5 trailers for tank transports with the designation Vsah.654 and Vsah.642. The 642 seems to be for heavier tanks as it is towed by the Sd.Kfz.9.

I know Sd.Ah.115 and 116 but how do these two above mentioned look. Were they the same with just another (pre war) designation?
Any info on Vsah.654 and 642 welcome.

Christoph

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Robert Hurst
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Tieflader fur Panzerkampfwagen

Post by Robert Hurst » 05 Dec 2002 13:14

Hi Christoph

The first photo in this post was taken from 'German Military Trailers and Towed Equipment 1935-1945', by Hosrt Beiersdorf. The next two sets of photos was taken from 'German Military Transports of World War Two', by John Milsom.

With regard to the two trailers designated Vsah 652 and 654, unfortunately I've no information whatsoever. But they could be German army designations for use with the commercial type 60-ton trailers that the Germans used. The 68-ton tank transporter was designated Sd.Ah.121 by the Germans and used for tranporting Tiger tanks.

Regards

Bob
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Xavier
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hello

Post by Xavier » 05 Dec 2002 15:29

the 4 axle one was built then (and after the war too) by the german Firm Scheurle
I know because a friend in Mexico used to have one, and he was surprised to discover it was an ex-german army trailer, he bought it together with a Menck excavator in the early 50's

other builders were

Brohaus
Cometto (italian name, but made in austria too)
regards

Xavier

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Christoph Awender
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Thanks

Post by Christoph Awender » 05 Dec 2002 16:43

Thanks very much to both of you!!

Do you think the heavy trailer with the cabin at the rear was already built in 1938? Does it give a production timeframe?

Christoph

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Xavier
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Post by Xavier » 05 Dec 2002 20:20

the cab in the back was used for steering the last two axles, also contained controls to disengange the load deck, and for the winch.

it was more easy to load since it did not need a earth ramp to load a working tank, and was easy to load a disabled tank unto it because of deck height.

usually it could be disengaged in the front or the back, there is one for sale in the netherlands right now by the company "syndorf trading" (do a gogle search)

I think it was available since 1930/31

I will do a search of some old papers, and will post back.

Xavier

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Robert Hurst
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Tieflader fur Panzerkampfwagen

Post by Robert Hurst » 06 Dec 2002 16:27

Hi Christoph

The folowing was taken from 'German Miltary Transport of World War two', by John Milsom.

The earliest tank-transporter trailers, intorduced before the war, were in two load classes - designed specifically for carrying the PzKpfw I and II respectively. One of these had an 8-ton rating and the other a 10-ton rating.

The only tank-transporter trailer in common use thoughout the greater part of the war ws one of 22 to 23-ton capacity, although trailers of 45-tons and 60-tons capacity were developed and standardised - without, however, being encountered in the field. A few specimens of 68-ton trailer for the Tiger II tank were encountered.

The 8- and 10-ton types, both known as Sd.Ah.115, were low loading trailers having a single pair of twin wheels with pneumatic tyres at either end. The front axle was arranged for fifth-wheel steering and supported the raised front end of the platform through its loading position on the ground. Ramps could be inserted from the loading platform to the top of the raised front portion enabling the entire trailer to be used as a ramp for loading the tank on to a railway flat or heavy lorry of the Faun L.900 D567 type.The unladen weight of the trailer was 5-tons and the overall length 31 ft, the width 8 ft and the height (unladen) 4 ft 9 in. It was manufactured by Wagen-und Maschinen AG vorm. Busch of Bautzen.

The 22-ton tank-transporter trailer (Sd.Ah.116) - later rated to carry 23-tons - differed from the previous model in having the loading platform suspended between two bogies, each with two pairs of single pneumatic-tyred wheels. Both pairs of wheels on the front bogie steered fromthe draw-bar by means of an arrangement of tie-rods. There was a similar arrangement at the rear, where a light draw-bar was provided for handling the bogie when detached; but in addition, a steering wheel with a compressed-air servo mechanism was provided for the use of an operator required to look after the rear end of the vehicle during travel (the driver of the trailer had to demonstrate driving ability equivalent to that of a holder of a Class 2 driver's licence). For raising and lowering the platform, hand-operated winches were used on the earlier models and hydraulic jacks on the later ones. The draw-bar could be locked in the central position. The earlier models were provided with special ramps to enable them to be used for loading railway flats over the front end of the transporter. The unladen weight of the trailer was 11 3/4 -tons, the overall length 45 ft 6 in, the width 9 ft 9 in and overall height (unladen) 8 ft. It was built by Robert Schenk, Waggon-Fabrik, Stuttgart-Feuerbach.

The 45-ton tank-transporter trailer was designated Sd.Ah.118 and consisted of front and rear bogies with the load platform suspended between them. The front bogie attachment to the load platform was semi-permanent, and the rear one was removable. There wqere eight single wheels sprung on individual leaf springs. The unladen weight was 15-tons. This trailer was produced by the Busch plant at Bautzen.

The 68-ton tank-transporter trailer, designated Sd.Ah.121, was designed to carry Tiger II tanks and ran on 24 wheel pivots for steering. All the wheels took part in the two suspension units that carried the load-carrying platform. Each suspension unit consisted of a bogie made in two parts, articulated together in a such a manner as to distribute the weight evenly between three axles which each carried four wheels and were mounted on fifth wheel pivots for steering. All the wheels took part in the steering by means of a system of rods and levers connected together at thier centres. The overall width of the platform was less than that of the Tiger II tank, so the latter overhung when loaded. Experience with this vehicle showed that it was unsuitable for towing at speeds much above 6 mph and was therefore not suited to the fast tactical movement of tanks. As was the case with the lighter transporters, it was probably intended for recovery purposes.

Regards

Bob
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