The official AHF Third Reich music quiz thread

Discussions on the music in the Third Reich. Hosted by Ivan Ž.
Tretyak
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Re: Question 108

Post by Tretyak » 26 Nov 2020 19:10

Absolutely!)

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Ivan Ž.
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Question 109

Post by Ivan Ž. » 27 Nov 2020 12:40

A new one: this song, which is still widely unknown in the world of internet, was the battle song of one of major (early) Third Reich organisations (whose name can be heard in the clip). What was the song called?


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Ivan Ž.
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Re: Question 109

Post by Ivan Ž. » 28 Nov 2020 16:00

The name of the organisation is an acronym composed of four letters. You can hear it near the end of the clip, right before "jetzt und allezeit". If you search the music section with this acronym, you'll instantly find the name of the song, and also who recorded the version used in the clip :)

GregSingh
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Re: Question 109

Post by GregSingh » 29 Nov 2020 09:13

Hello, I think I hear:

Wir kämpfen treu mit Herz und Hand
für Volk und Führer und Vaterland.
Der deutschen Arbeit sei geweiht
die NSBO jetzt und allezeit.

Never heard this one before, while searching music section it came as Betriebspioniere.
No idea if it's 1933 or 1934 recording...
Last edited by GregSingh on 30 Nov 2020 00:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Question 109

Post by Ivan Ž. » 29 Nov 2020 13:05

Well done, Greg :thumbsup:

Yes, the song is barely known today, although it was a battle song of a major NS organisation (and a very catchy one too).
Lyrics: viewtopic.php?f=81&t=253419
Performer: viewtopic.php?f=81&t=252536 (scroll down to see the record label)
It was also recorded by the Leibstandarte band, in early 1934.

Over to you!
Ivan

GregSingh
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Question 110

Post by GregSingh » 30 Nov 2020 05:15

Not too difficult I hope...What music was played right before Hitler's death was announced on the radio?
The more you let yourself to go, the less others will let you to go.
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TrommlerBO
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Re: Question 110

Post by TrommlerBO » 30 Nov 2020 19:15

It`s the second movement (Adagio) of Anton Bruckner's Seventh Symphony in E major.

Is it true?

GregSingh
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Re: Question 110

Post by GregSingh » 01 Dec 2020 04:30

Yes, that's the one I was thinking about. Bruckner began writing it in anticipation of the death of Richard Wagner.
Your turn!
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Question 111

Post by TrommlerBO » 01 Dec 2020 06:44

Herms Niel once told which march he didn't like at all.

Which one is it?

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Re: Question 111

Post by TrommlerBO » 05 Dec 2020 12:03

Let me give you a hint: it is an early work by the composer Kurt Noack.

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Re: Question 111

Post by GregSingh » 07 Dec 2020 23:07

Only K. Noack's composition I know of is Brownies' Guard Parade. They play it sometimes at Edinburgh Military Tattoo.
The more you let yourself to go, the less others will let you to go.
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TrommlerBO
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Re: Question 111

Post by TrommlerBO » 08 Dec 2020 21:40

Unfortunately it is not correct.
Last edited by TrommlerBO on 08 Dec 2020 21:43, edited 1 time in total.

TrommlerBO
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Re: Question 111

Post by TrommlerBO » 08 Dec 2020 21:41

Herms Niel setzte sich einst mit Liebhabern seiner Musik zusammen. Die Leute konnten ihm Fragen stellen und er sprach über sein Leben. Zum Beispiel, wie er in die Musik kam. Vieles, was wir heute noch über ihn wissen, wissen wir aus dem, was von den Leuten erzählt wurde, die ihm zuhörten. Erst Jahrzehnte später erinnerten sich die Menschen daran.
Herms Niel erzählte ihnen auch, welchen Marsch er überhaupt nicht mochte (obwohl es mir sehr gut
gefällt). Es ist ein Charakterstück von Kurt Noack - Opus 5.;)

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Ivan Ž.
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Re: Question 111

Post by Ivan Ž. » 08 Dec 2020 22:27

Hello, TrommlerBO

Please post in the forum language, which is English. If you're by any chance quoting a text, please use quotation marks or the quote option within a post (the fourth button from the upper left in the post field). Also, Noack's Opus 5 was "Heinzelmännchens Wachtparade", known in English as the "Brownies' Parade", "Parade of the Brownies", or the "Brownies' Guard Parade", as Greg correctly wrote.

Cheers,
Ivan

TrommlerBO
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Re: Question 111

Post by TrommlerBO » 09 Dec 2020 19:47

Hello,

You're right, I only knew the German edition title. The German text was a mistake on my part, I had problems with my translation program. In the following you find the text again in English.

Best regards,

TrommlerBO

Herms Niel once sat down with lovers of his music. People could ask his questions and he talked about his life. For example, how he got into music. Much of what we still know about him today, we know from what was told by the people who listened to him. It wasn't until decades later that people remembered.
Herms Niel also told which march he didn't do at all (although I liked it very much). It is a character piece by Kurt Noack - Opus 5 ;)

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