Kalmuck Cavalry Corps

Discussions on the foreigners (volunteers as well as conscripts) fighting in the German Wehrmacht, those collaborating with the Axis and other period Far Right organizations. Hosted by George Lepre.
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Juanjo
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Kalmuck Cavalry Corps

Post by Juanjo » 08 Jul 2007 16:16

Anyone know the names of the kalmucks officers who commanded the cavalry squadrons of the Kalmuck Cavalry Corps?

Kalmuck Cavalry Corps
CO: Major Ottmar Werba
Adjuntant: Major Eduard Bataev
Chief of Staff: Major Baldan Metabon
Major Mukeben Chachlysev
Hauptmann Dordzi Arbakov

I Batallion
CO: Major Lukyanov Cilgirov
1º Squadron
4º Squadron
7º Squadron
8º Squadron
18º Squadron

II Bataillon
CO: Major Boldyrev Mukubenov
5º Squadron
6º Squadron
12º Squadron
20º Squadron
23º Squadron

III Bataillon
CO: Major Abushinov Cilgirov
3º Squadron
14º Squadron
17º Squadron
21º Squadron
25º Squadron

IV Bataillon
CO: Major Kononov Savkaev
2º Squadron
13º Squadron
19º Squadron
22º Squadron
24º Squadron

Thanks in advance

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clement
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otto doll

Post by clement » 11 Jul 2007 18:06

In September 1942, the first Kalmyk cavalery squad is created. November the same year, the number of squads went to four. Later, the number was ten squads. All were subjected to the German headquarters, which was headed by sonderfuhrer Rudolf Verba (his nickname was Dr. Otto Doll). In August 1943, all kalmyk were merged in Kalmytsky Cavalry Corps. It was composed of a headquarters, four Cavalry Division and a number of support services. Division included five squads. In the spring of 1945 the remnants of a Kalmyk Cavalry Regiment was assigned to the 3rd Btl Kazach Cavalry Division and the SS 15th Corps. The main purpose of all kalmyks corps was fighting guerrillas and the protection of important installations and communications. Since spring 1943 Kalmyks deployed in the Sea of Azov coast. In autumn 1943 the Kalmyk Corps has been on the right bank of the Dnieper. Then, gradually moving westward
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Post by clement » 15 Jul 2007 15:25

Juanjo,I have found this about Kalmucks
Source :adolfhitlerresearchsociety.org/index_files/Page3892.html - 143k

According to Muñoz and Romanko (2001), “The Kalmucks was a Mongolian race of people, scattered throughout central Asia, and extending westward into southern Russia. The name was not used by the people themselves, but by Turkic races of Asia and the Russians to designate the allied tribes of the Zungars, Torgod (Keraits and Eleuths), Khoshod, and Doerboed. These tribes lived in Zungaria; around Koko-nor in northeastern Tibet; in the district called Ordus, within the great loop of the Yellow River of China; on the western slopes of the Altai; and in the steppes between the Don and the Volga Rivers and Caspian Sea. They were nomads, possessing herds of horses, cattle, and sheep” (East Came West, p. 149). They had migrated, circa 1700, to the Volga Steppes; they migrated again “in response to a Chinese ‘invitation’” in 1771. Indeed, these nomadic Kalmucks checked the local Kazak power-structure, and their story of victorious resistance was documented in an essay entitled, “Revolt of the Tartars” (Ibid.). In fact, the name “Kalmuck” [sometimes spelled Kalmyck] literally means “‘to remain’ in the Turkish language” (Ibid.). These unique people were actually a remnant of the Oirat Mongol Confederacy, which had, at one time, battled for control of Peking, China, between 1450 and 1650 (Muñoz et al., pp. 149-150). The Kalmucks had unfortunately found themselves constantly embroiled in the ludicrous war games of both China and Russia. The Kalmucks had proven themselves so resistant, in fact, that the Muslims and ruling Turks had failed to either absorb them or convert them. Remarkably, they were the only Wehrmacht unit comprised solely of Buddhists (Muñoz et. al., p. 150).
As noted by Muñoz and Romanko (2002), “Like all peoples under Stalinist [Jewish-Bolshevik] rule, the Kalmuck way of life was turned upside down by the [Jewish] Communist lack of belief in God, collectivization methods, and other [criminal, alien, and murderous] restrictions on the lives of these and other peoples” (p. 150). The deceptive crypto-Jew and single most genocidal leader in Russian history, Vlad Lenin, made empty promises to these people, claiming that he would allow them more freedom if they were to help him and his racist Jewish executioners slaughter the Czarist regime. The Kalmucks refused, forming numerous “republics,” which served as tiny divine bulwarks against Satan’s Jewish hordes. The Kalmucks proved so tough, that even the murderous, maniacal, and genocidal Jewish NKVD could not attain the upper hand until 1941. Indeed, the Kalmucks lost at least 90,000 to Satan’s hordes in this long-lived struggle of survival. By 1959, the Kalmuck population had decreased by at least 100,000, due to the genocidal Jewish-led onslaught. The Kalmucks paid with their lives for: choosing to worship God, resisting the brutal methodology of the numerous Jewish-instigated famines and collective “farming” campaigns, fighting against Moscow, and fighting for Adolf Hitler (Ibid.).
Stalin had unleashed a full-scale genocide campaign against the Kalmuck Nazi volunteers of WWII. He exacted genocidal revenge upon these Mongolian-Russian people, simply because they had volunteered to fight for Hitler. His ultimate goal was the genocide of their tiny population. Stalin’s Jewish executioners mass murdered at least 90,000 of these people before WWII, simply because they worshipped God; as they were Buddhists, not Judaic-Bolsheviks (Muñoz & Romanko, p. 150). It is unknown how many more Kalmucks Stalin’s willing executioners murdered after the war ended. The “Allies” did not do a thing to help them. There are only about 100,000 of these people alive today (Net Industries, worldwide, 2006). It might be pertinent to note that they were extremely brave fighters, and the Nazis heaped praises upon their hardiness and ruthlessness. Their Panje horses proved to be life-savers in the perilous Russian steppes (Muñoz et. al., p. 153).
The story of the Kalmuck volunteers is extremely fascinating, not only because the Nazis had allegedly seen these people as “Untermenschen,” [lesser people] but, more importantly, because they were ardent followers of their own religion and steadfast way of life, which found itself somewhat in opposition to National Socialism. They were followers of what they called, “The Greater Way,” which is a Buddhist precept (Muñoz et. al., p. 149). The Kalmucks, as well as the Cossacks and Tartars, were granted absolute respect by the invading Nazi defense machine; they were all allowed—indeed, they were encouraged—to fight for their own self-defense. The most renowned and steadfast of these self-defense units came to be known as the Kalmuck Calvary Corps (Ibid.). According to Muñoz and Romanko (2001), “It would become one of the most exotic foreign volunteer units in the Wehrmacht” (p. 149).
When Hitler’s panzers came roaring into Russia in the summer of 1942, the Kalmucks decided that this might be their last hope for sovereignty and survival. The Nazis were allowed to “set up shop” in the city of Elista; a city in the Kalmuck Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic established by Stalin in 1935. Long-range reconnaissance patrols were immediately established in the nearby town of Uta. The Russians immediately responded by sending their partisan Communist murder-squadrons into the Kalmuck ASSR (Ibid.). Soon after the Germans had set-up camp here, in August 1942, their 16th Motorized Infantry Division began to experience guerilla attacks and destructive raids along their established lines of communication. Major Poltermann, “the Ic of the Division,” requested Hitler’s permission to establish a Kalmuck “volunteer militia” to help with the guarding of the German flanks. The Germans were in a race to win the hearts and minds of these local Kalmucks, as the Soviets had already won over at least 8, 664 for the purpose of sabotage against the incoming German forces. Lieutenant-Colonel von Freytag-Loringhoven wasted no time in making the necessary phone calls in order to get a knowledgeable Kalmuck-language interpreter at the scene. The officer turned out to be a certain Rudolf Vrba—Is this possibly the same Rudolf Vrba who had testified at the Zuendel trial as an alleged “Holocaust survivor”? He went by “Dr. Otto Doll,” but his assumed name was Otmar Werva. According to one source, his real name was Rudolf Vrba. Vrba was born in Russia and had fought on the side of the White Russians during the Russian Civil War. He was an officer of very respectable caliber. He ended up joining the Nazi-Sozi Abwehr in 1938. At the time of his summation to the Kalmuck region, he had been serving as an Abwehr agent in the Crimea (Muñoz et. al., p. 151). He was the only person that the Germans could find who spoke fluent Tibetan, which was the language of the Kalmucks. He was quickly promoted from the rank of Lance Corporal to the extremely respectable rank of Sonderfuehrer. He eventually attained the extremely respectable rank of “Major or Colonel.”
Vrba quickly became the much respected love of the Kalmuck people. He organized the Kalmucks into their very first pro-Nazi unit—Abwehrtrupp 103—in August 1942. This formidable force consisted of “two cavalry squadrons with about 150 horsemen in each unit.” The Nazis had actually offered semi-autonomous rights to the Kalmucks, in return for their help, which they had not offered to many other ethnic groups. They had offered this same compromise to the Caucasians of the region. The Nazis helped them reopen their closed-down Buddhist temples, and local indigenous leaders and authorities exercised almost complete sovereign authority under the temporary Nazi occupation. In December 1942, the Nazis helped them usher in sweeping agrarian reforms, thus restoring to them their lost fertile croplands. Indeed, “The success and cooperation between the Germans and their benevolent policies netted great accomplishments in recruiting these native nomadic horsemen into [ever] more squadrons” (Muñoz et. al., p. 154). The Caucasian people had suffered most heavily under Jewish-Bolshevism, as they lost some “4,000 mosques, 2,000 meddressahs (religious schools), and 10,000 mullahs (religious leaders) that existed in the region in 1920” (Muñoz et. al., p. 152). By 1939, only 150 mosques and 150 mullahs remained (Muñoz et. al., p. 153). The Caucasian religious buildings had been decimated; their Islamic leaders were mass murdered and/or sent to Gulags to starve, linger, and die. The Nazi’s respect for the local culture, as well as their offers of help, and guarantees of sovereignty, made the Kalmucks and Caucasians react extremely favorably to the German occupation on the whole. Indeed, the inhumane result of their support for the Nazis led to the exile of the entire Kalmuck nation in 1946—at the hands of the genocidal and racist Jewish leadership in Russia. Let it be known that the Chechens, Ingush, and even some other indigenous Caucasian peoples had suffered most heavily for supporting Hitler. The Germans had actually noted: “In some areas, such as the Cossack and Kalmyck lands in the North and in the Muslim areas, the welcome was truly enthusiastic” (Ibid.). The Kalmucks willingly offered their sturdy Panje steeds to replace the tens-of-thousands of European horses that had succumbed to the weather and the strain of war (Ibid.). Their Panje horses could survive in temperatures as low as minus 4 degrees. The Kalmucks also relied heavily upon their Bactrian camels (Muñoz et. al., p. 154).
By September, there were twenty-five defense units which consisted of one hundred men each. Their mission entailed protecting the Kalmuck settlements from Communist partisans, as well as engaging and defeating Communist and partisan guerilla forces in combat. According to Muñoz and Romanko (2002), “They operated in swiftness and stealth,” and had proven themselves so efficient that they had both the time and resources to help defend the exposed flanks of the Nazi 16th Motorized Infantry Division (p. 154). The Kalmucks acted so brutally and murderously against their oppressors on the battlefield, in fact so much so that even Nazi sensibilities had been insulted! One German officer had remarked: “…they launched themselves passionately into their work. Indeed, they set about wiping out groups of Russians in the Steppes with such ardour that the German Army at times had to intervene to prevent atrocities” (Ibid.). Furthermore, the Kalmucks had been so incredibly effective on horseback that they were able to help defend the Nazi troops at Utta, Chalkuta, and Justa, “on both sides of the Elista-Astrakhan road” (Ibid.). The benevolent Nazi occupation administration had proved to be extremely effective. The Nazis had even proclaimed: “The land is yours. You are free from the oppression of the Czars and Bolsheviks…In order to keep power you must fight against the Soviet authority and its supporters” (Muñoz et. al., p. 155). The Kalmucks fought like hell, so much so that they drove out the last remnants of the NKVD and established five units of about 40 men each of their own initiative. By December 1942, at least 3,000 Kalmucks were fighting for Hitler. There were about 40 German officers and just as many Kalmuck officers. The Kalmucks even tolerated the mass-shootings of Jewish dissidents at the hands of Einsatzgruppe D. They killed about 300 Jews in this region.
The Kalmucks were eventually led by Vrba and his Kalmuck Chief of Staff, Baldan Metabon. One battalion under Vrba’s command was led by a Kalmuck known as Major Abushinov. The Kalmuck squadrons received weapons from Ortskommandantur I/649. With these weapons, the Kalmucks achieved a decisive victory over the Russian partisans near Ulan Tug, which was near Utta (Ibid.). Regrettably, the Germans had to begin retreating from the onslaught of the treacherous Russian winter, and the Kalmucks began to despair. Many of them decided to migrate to the Ukraine with the Cossacks and Caucasians. About 15,000 fled while about 80,000 elected to remain. Some wanted to try their luck in spite of the retreating Nazis, and a single division was raised to continue guerilla operations against the Soviets (Muñoz et. al., pp. 157-158). They were more than likely completely eliminated or disbanded by the murderous NKVD by 1943. In December 1942, Hitler had stated, “For the time being I consider the formation of these battalions of purely Caucasian peoples very risky, while I don’t see any danger in the establishment of purely Moslem units…In spite of all the declarations from Rosenberg and the military, I don’t trust the Armenians either” (Muñoz et. al., p. 158). Indeed, Hitler had much preferred Godly and believing soldiers, of various faiths, over the overthrown “godless” Slavs. Hitler considered the Muslims to be the single most reliable helpers, while Stalin viewed them as the worst of enemies. Remarkably, as late as January 1943, there were still functioning Kalmuck cavalry squadrons fighting against the Red Army “just east of Salsk” (Muñoz et. al., p. 159). By February, the Kalmucks had withdrawn “alongside the 3rd Panzer Division until they reached Taganrog, where they were then attached to Feldkommandantur 200” (Ibid.). They ended up defending the coast near the Sea of Azov. In March 1943, Field Marshal von Kleist ordered that the Kalmuck and Cossack units be dispatched to “Kherson in the Ukraine” (Ibid.) where they could fight side-by-side as a formidable force (Muñoz et. al. p. 160). The Kalmucks had actually been mistakenly sent by ignorant “higher authorities,” and they were quickly withdrawn to safety.
In March 1943 the Kalmucks received 1,000 Dutch rifles and 35,000 rounds for their new weapons. Before they acquired these gems, they had to rely on sabers and primitive Russian rifles. Their forces had strengthened to 2,200 men, 79 Kalmuck officers, 353 NCOs, and 2, 030 horses and camels. They were transferred from the coast to the lower Dneiper where they were merged with Oberfeldkommanten 397. They had acquired 700 additional men and about a dozen more NCOs along the way. Astonishingly, they gained over 2,500 horses and camels as well (Ibid.)! Sadly, their Major Ottmar Rudolf Werba was killed in action in July 1944, along with Kalmuck Major Mukeben Chachlysev. Captain Dordzi Arbakoz assumed the post of Chief of Staff, and Colonel Eduard Bataev replaced Vrba. Lieutenant Kuskin, the Kalmuck Chief of Field Police, was killed in September 1944. These deaths greatly reduced Kalmuck morale, but they continued to serve “behind the lines” throughout 1943 (Muñoz et. al., p. 161). The German Landser had this to say about the Kalmuck fighters:
These clandestine forces in the inaccessible hiding places of the swamps would have been a serious danger to the German lines but for Senior Sergeant Willi Lilienthal. This man from Hamburg turned up at the end of November 1943 with the Kalmuck Major Abushinov. With him came five cavalry squadrons– 1,200 Kalmyck volunteers from the yurt villages of the Kalmyck Steppe. These mortal enemies of the Russians had been fighting on the German side since the summer of 1942. With their wives and families they had followed 16th Panzer Grenadier Division from the wide-open spaces around Elista all the way to the west. There were no better scouts and no better hunters of partisans. They kept the franctireurs of the Plavna in check (Ibid.).
These are the true heroes of WWII, along with the other Nazi collaborators, and the only people who deserve to be paid by the modern German state. The Germans owe them their lives and eternal thanks. The Germans owe the Jews absolutely nothing but condemnation.
Around the month of December, 1943, the Kalmucks engaged Russian Major Kirpa’s partisan fighters, killing 50 guerillas and capturing another 32. They served as the Nazis’ safe-guarders as they passed through the Plavna swamps (Muñoz et. al., p. 162). In February 1944, the SS decided that special identifying insignia was no longer needed for their Tartar, Kalmuck, and Caucasian volunteers because they had proven themselves so reliable and trustworthy. The Slavs had to continue to wear their special identifying patches (Ibid.). The Kalmucks were then used as fighters against the Polish underground army in Lublin, Poland (Muñoz et. al., p. 163). They were able to kill about 900 Poles, while capturing another 700. They also seized myriad weapons and rounds (Ibid.). Indeed, the Kalmucks remained loyal, even after the death of Vrba, and they continued to fight for Nazi Germany in the Radom district. There, they fought the Bolshevik onslaught as late as January 1945 (Muñoz et. al., p. 165). They withdrew to Austria the following month, 5,000 men strong, continuously fighting the Russians along the way. They reached Austria in March 1945, but, their remaining troops were absorbed into the 600th and 650th Russian ROA Infantry Divisions—due to the inevitable Nazi defeat—upon the official dissolution of the Kalmuck Calvary Corps (Muñoz et. al., pp. 165-166).

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clement
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Post by clement » 15 Jul 2007 15:46

Just a few words about http://www.adolfhitlerresearchsociety.org that I have discovered recently.
Not my cup of tea at all "Stalinist [Jewish-Bolshevik] rule""deceptive crypto-Jew " etc ....
I personally do not agree with those theories.I am just interested in history.The coldest monster as Friedrich Nietzsche used to say
Take care
Clement

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STURMWIND I & II

Post by Orlov » 25 Jul 2007 20:34

clement wrote: The Kalmucks were then used as fighters against the Polish underground army in Lublin, Poland (Muñoz et. al., p. 163). They were able to kill about 900 Poles, while capturing another 700. They also seized myriad weapons and rounds (Ibid.)


German prepare to anti-partisan operations against mainly Communist Partisans - People's Army (Armia Ludowa - AL): STURMWIND I & II.

Kalmucks fightning:

Col. Doll start fightning at pacification in Parczewski Forest and Janowski Forest. This action "Maigewitter" commanded by SS-PF in Lublin District - SS-Gruppenführer Jakob Sporrenberg. His effect was destroying northern part of AL formation at Rablow, 14 MAY1944 r.

STURMWIND I.
PARTISAN FORCES 3-3,500 MEN:
* part of 1. Brigade AL im. "Lublin Land" comm. by Ignacy Borkowski pseudonym "Wicek",
* Brigade AL "Wanda Wasilewska" comm. by Stanislaw Szelest,
* NKVD parachutist and liaison unit to AL comm. by Leon Kasman ps. "Janowski",
* group of PPR with secretary Lublin Distr. Kazimierz Wyrwys i member of Comittee V Area Janow Lubelski Edward Szymanski,
* unit NOW (National Military Organisation)-AK "John Father", comm. by leut. Boleslaw Usow ps. "Konar",
* units of Soviet Partisans comm. by col. NKWD Nikolaj Prokopiuk, mjr Karasiow, mjr. W. Czepiga, cpt. P. Wasilienko, leut J. Jakowlew and Sankow.

Before Sturmwind I Kalmuks was transport from the neighborhood Rawa Ruska and Lubaczow to area Zawada - Susiec. Korps - 4 000 ludzi ( to 6000), under command Doll - must concquer railway Rejowiec - Lwow, drive through Zawada - Susiec in Partisan hands. Regulat two weeks fightning at Tanwi (28 MAY - 9 JUNE 1944 r.) was Partisan succes (unfortunately this information based on communist sources). It was first part of 4-weeks STURMWIND I.

11 JUNE - Soldiers BCh "Lipa" fight at village Graby against Kalmuks cavalry. "Lipa" have only 16 men. Leut. Kaczmarczyk and 12 men get defence position at the side village, and 4 next protect side of Majdan Jarocinski.
First enemy attack was fight off. But really astonishment was counter-attack preprared by BCH and enemy must run..
Unfortunately Germans saved reserve forces and leut. Kaczmarczyk back to first position. Partisan try repulse German attack by 3 hrs., but all died (without 4 men).

14 June Partisan Intelligence inform about use main forces of Kalmuks in Sturmwind I
15 June Kalmuks attack Partisan. Main forces col. Prokopiuk was attacked at the time of break in march in villages Szeliga and Ciosma. Attack prepared by part of Kalmucksin strenght 3 cav. sqd. Doll's forces penetrated Partisan defence and next Kalmuks was closed in encirclement between Szeligą and Ciosma. Partisan attacks impel Kalmucks to retreat to marsh, where were knock out (at this moment I check only old Communist sources)
LOSSES:
Partisan approx. 250 men, incl. 125 KIA and MIA. German (Wehrmacht) lost 495 KIA i wounded, no information about losses of police, gendarmerie and Kalmucks.

STURMWIND II
Part of forces AK (Armia Krajowa - Home Army) i BCh (Bataliony Chlopskie - Peasent's Bataillons) fight against UPA and Korps col. Doll, at line river Tanwia and at the side Hrubieszow (line Tyszowce - Laszczow - Jarczow.
At 26 - 29 JUNE German units alongside Kalmuks destroyed lonely Partisan. They checked forests.
LOSSES:
partisan 900 men (incl. AK i BCh lost 650 men, AL 150 i Soviet approx. 100. Germans 700 KIA and wounded

Sources:
Borysiuk Boleslaw "Lata walki. PPR, GL, AL. na polnocnej Lubelszczyznie 1942 - 1944 r" (Fightning Years. PPR, GL, AL in northern part of Lublin area 1942-1944) - prepared by PhD at High School of Social Science at Central Comittee of Communist Party
Garas Jozef Boleslaw "Oddzialy Gwardii Ludowej i Armii Ludowej 1942-1945" (Units of Peoples Guard and Peoples Army 1942-1945) - author disposable to Communist
I will check also new Polish historiography after 1989 (including famous and excellent monography by Jaroslaw Gdanski "Forgotten Hitler's Soldier" - "Zapomniani zolnierze Hitlera"

bestreg
Orlov

PS: LEGEND OF UNITS TO FIRST MAP: 1) Unit "Janowski" 2) Unit maj. W. Karasiow 3) Unit col-leut. Prokopiuk 4) Unit W. Pielich "Galicki" 5) Unit W. Czepiga 6) Unit M. Miedelin 7) Unit S. Sankow 8) Unit M. Kunicki, 9) Unit J. Jakowlew
10) Brigade AL "Lublin Land" 11) Brigade AL "W.Wasilewska".
LEGEND OF UNITS TO SECOND MAP: 1) Bataillon BCh "Rys" 2) Unit BCh "Blyskawica" 3) Unit BCh "Burza" 4) Unit BCh "Skrzypek" 5) Course of Young Inf. Comm. AK "Wir" 6) Unit AK "Cord" 7) Staff Comp. of Zamosc Inspector AK "Woyna" 8) Unit AK "Topola" 9) Platoon "Korczak" 10) Forest Hospital AK 11) Unit AK "Podkowa" 12) Unit BCh "Huragan" 16) various recce units BCh i AK
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Post by ''X'' » 25 Jul 2007 21:35

Very interesting

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Post by clement » 26 Jul 2007 11:19

Thank you very much for your posting.Amazing.I wish I could speak Polish .I translate some Polih texts with on-line translators but sometimes it is not understandable
By the way do you have anything about Azerbaijaneses (azeris) in Poland .Bergmann ,dirlewanger ,kaminsky or Btl 818.
I am working on the Aserbaidschan Legion for sometimes and Polish sources are not known.
Thanks in advance
Clement

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Re: Kalmuck Cavalry Corps

Post by Orlov » 26 Jul 2007 17:28

Excellent J. Gdanski "Forgotten Soldier of Hitler" (unfortunatelly only Polish Edition - Warsaw 2005, s. 153) inform about dr Doll who was MIA on July 1944 when Kalmucks fight against Red Army. Commander stay Col.-Leutn. Bergen. Calmucks officer replaced by Germans and korps stayed 2-regimental unit of cavalry.Col. Hoerst (before stab oficer in German Military Misssion in Romania) have became commander Korps since early Jan. '45.


bestreg Orlov

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Re: Kalmuck Cavalry Corps

Post by Jan-Hendrik » 20 Nov 2008 11:38

In the Deutsches Soldatenjahrbuch 1976, which I received today, is a long article on the Kalmücks in Wehrmacht service :wink:

Jan-Hendrik

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Re: Kalmuck Cavalry Corps

Post by cossacknn » 20 Aug 2009 15:00

Oberst a.D. Constantin Wagner "Kalmückische Reiter-Verbände in der Deutschen Wehrmacht"//Deutsches Soldatenjahrbuch, München, 1976 s.226-236: http://www.elan-kazak.ru/arhiv-ino.htm

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