IJA divisions: an overview

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hisashi
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IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 08 Mar 2009 04:42

This article owes much to "The divisional number tells the history of formations" by Tato Hiroshi(田藤博) in 'The War History of Divisions in the Pacific War(太平洋戦争師団戦史)' (1996) from Shinjimbutsu Oraisha (ISBN 4404023715). Mr. Tato served in artillery school of JGSDF and a war historian mainly of artillery formations and educations.

<Before 2nd Sino-Japanese War>

Long ago I posted here a long article 'Japanese Decision 1905-1945'.

viewtopic.php?t=119821

As I noted at 'Groups in the army generals and Ugaki armament reduction' section of that article, in 1925 Japan reduced the number of permanent division from 21 to 17. 1st to 20th except 13th,15th,17th and 18th, and the imperial guard division.

When the division were absent from their base, they raised a homekeeping division (Rusu-Shidan). This formation was typically headed by a reserve lieutenant general and dealt with supply, recruitment and reinforcement.

Each infantry regiment except imperial guard had its regimental district, covering all Japan without any overlap. divisional district was the union of regimental districts and other services-in-arm recruited their draftees based on divisional districts. regimental districts sometimes did not coincide with prefectural border and included parts of two prefectures.

Imperial guard requested all other regiments to recommend their best men to the guard.

Related topic:
viewtopic.php?f=65&t=111276

<In the Beginning of 2nd Sino-Japanese War>

In 1937, just before 2nd Sino-Japanese War, Japan raised temporal (tokusetsu) divisions by reserve personnels from each divisional district. They called in the plan permanent divisions as ko shidan (type-A division) and temporal divisions as otsu shidan (type-B division). Two divisions differed each other in the quality of personnel, training and perhaps equipments. As German welle system, this distinction became ambiguous in that various temporal divisions were raised from poorer resources than for otsu divisions in 1937.

It was not the reaction to the conflict in 1937 but a part of military expansion plan from 1937 to 1942, finally increasing the number of permanent division from 17 to 27.

There were 17 permanent divisions in IJA but divisional districts were in effect 14. They planned 13 temporal divisions but raised 11 and cancelled 2. Now let us see in order.

Imperial Guard, 19th and 20th did not have their own divisional districts. 19th and 20th were in Korea and received draftees from Japan, though they raised rusu-shidan while they went abroad.

7th division from Hokkaido did not raise any temporal division this time from two reasons. They themselves must defend Soviet border, and Hokkaido was less populated. Even at the outset of the Pacific War 7th was not deployed in the south, and dispatched a regiment-sized battle group. It was the well-known Ichiki-Shitai in Guadalcanal.

The divisional number of permanent and temporal division this time was as follows

1 -> 101(abolished in 1940)
2 -> 13(to 1945)
3 -> 15(to 1945)
4 -> 104(to 1945)
5 -> cancelled(105)
6 -> 106(abolished in 1940)
8 -> 108(abolished in 1940, number used 1944 to raise other divison)
9 -> 109(abolished in 1940, number used 1944 to raise other divison)
10 -> 17(to 1945)
11 -> cancelled(111)
12 -> 18(to 1945)
14 -> 114(abolished in 1939, number used 1944 to raise other divison)
16 -> 116(to 1945)

Cancelled numbers (105 and 111) were also later used to raise divisions from different resources.

(to be continued)

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by Peter H » 09 Mar 2009 02:38

19th and 20th were in Korea and received draftees from Japan, though they raised rusu-shidan while they went abroad.


hisashi

Would any Japanese recruits living in Korea also be drafted into these divisions?

This link suggests "the need was felt for a dedicated garrison force, raised from people with local knowledge.."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IJA_19th_Division

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IJA_20th_Division

Peter

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 09 Mar 2009 18:10

Peter, before IJA raised 19th and 20th division IJA appointed Korea defense troops in turn among divisions in Japan. They were not familiar with the situation in Korea and IJA decided to form divisions specialized in the defense of Korea. The description in English Wikipedia is somewhat misleading.

In Japanese system even today we keep family register along with resident registration. For example I am living in Tokyo for almost 20 years but I and my wife keep family registration in Kyoto, where I grew up. Changing the place of family registration is not very difficult; easier than getting our passport for the first time. But anyway draftee calling was from regimental district of family registration. It is difficult to assume that a considerable number of Japaneses working in Korea transferred their family registration to Korea, willingly losing the local tie to Japan.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 10 Mar 2009 17:15

<Mixed Brigade and Independent Mixed Brigade>

Square (4 infantry regiments) divisions had two infantry brigades. IJA often formed a temporal battlegroup of one infantry brigade and some artillery and other support units.

For example, On January 28 Incident in 1932, 24th Mixed Brigade participated in the battle. This formation was led by 24th brigade HQ (12th division) and consisted of four battalions from four regiments in 12th division plus engineer unit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_28_Incident
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_B ... 8_Incident

The deployment of mixed brigade was more or less temporal. They usually rejoined to their mother division.

1st and 11th Independent Mixed Brigade appeared in 1934. 1st was a motorized formation (1 tank regiment, 1 infantry regiemnt and 1 artillery battalion) and 11th was an artillery-heavy GHQ reserve unit of Kwantung army (2 infantry regiments and 2 artillery battalions). Seeing the situation in China theater changed to defensive phase, IJA disbanded those costly formations in 1937/1938.

In 1938 IJA needed defensive formations to take over the occupied area from regular divisions. By the beginning of the Pacific war IJA deployed 20 IMBs (1st to 20th) in China, and 21st IMB as a regular formation in Vietnum. They mostly consisted of reserve personnels and usually served as backline security units.

Topic related to 21st IMB:
viewtopic.php?f=65&t=150320

<divisions planned by 1939>

From 1938 IJA expanded divisions from various resources.

(1) From infantry regiments square divisions gave up:
23,24,25,28,29
(2) By reforming 11th IMB
26
(3) By reforming Tianjin stationing formations:
27
(4) By newly raising infantry regiments:
21,22,32-41

Those in the last category were security divisions - at least when planned. You notice that some divisional numbers appear in Imphal/Burma theater and the fierce battles in New Guinea/Biak.

Most of them became ready for combat by 1939 but abstructing a regiment from divisions still fighting in China was difficult. Especially 29th division was officially raised in early 1941.


(to be continued)

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by Peter H » 10 Mar 2009 23:47

hisashi wrote:Peter, before IJA raised 19th and 20th division IJA appointed Korea defense troops in turn among divisions in Japan. They were not familiar with the situation in Korea and IJA decided to form divisions specialized in the defense of Korea. The description in English Wikipedia is somewhat misleading.

In Japanese system even today we keep family register along with resident registration. For example I am living in Tokyo for almost 20 years but I and my wife keep family registration in Kyoto, where I grew up. Changing the place of family registration is not very difficult; easier than getting our passport for the first time. But anyway draftee calling was from regimental district of family registration. It is difficult to assume that a considerable number of Japaneses working in Korea transferred their family registration to Korea, willingly losing the local tie to Japan.


Thanks hisashi!

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by Peter H » 12 Mar 2009 22:31

hisashi

Re Mixed Brigades.

A conscript could serve as follows?:

First:

Regular(3 years)-Division

then:

Reservist(3 years?)-Mixed Brigade?


What happened to a reservist once he had finished his term in the reserves?Kept on for the duration of the war?


Did all reservists go into Mixed Brigades or did some also serve in other divisions/units after their regular service

21 MBs (the equivalent of 10 Divisions) doesn't seem enough to absorb say 200,000 men each year passing into the reserve.

Peter

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 13 Mar 2009 14:35

According to the site by Prof.Tamura Yuzuru (Matsuyama Univ.), the ratio of called up 20-years-old men to inspected ones was 25% in 1937 but rapidly increased to 77% in 1944. In other words, untrained grown-up from Japan was one of the source for security troops along with reserve veterans.
http://www.cc.matsuyama-u.ac.jp/~tamura/tyoheisei.html
In earlier stage IJA mobilized 44 backline infantry battalions (後備歩兵大隊 kobi hohei daitai). I have no source about the composition of those battalions, but I guess they included a considerable number of adults never called to the army along with old veterans.
Some of those battalions belonged to a regular division for security missions and the other formed a backline group (後備隊 kobitai, 4 BIBs each).
The first 20 (security mission) IMBs were from the following resources:
(1) from a part of disbanded/sent back divisions: 1 15 16 17 18 19 20
(2) from Kwantung Army independent border garrisons (volunteer reserves): 2
(3) amalgum of (1) and (2): 3 10
(4) from reserves/untrained adults in Japan: 4 5
(5) reorganizing BIBs:6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14

The term of service for reserves (in narrower sense) was 5 years 4 months after they finished their first two-year active service. 10 years of backline service (後備役 kobieki) followed. In Nov 1941 Japan unified the two services into 15 year 4 months reserve.

In earlier stage of war many lucky soldiers were released to Japan with the end of their service and often remobilized later.

In 1940 IJA mobilization jumped up. Perhaps men in temporal divisions disbanded in 1940 remained in reserve troop of regular divisions or rusu-shidan in their district to form new formations just planned. Later in isolated area (e.g.Rabaul and Philippine) they often formed 'mixed-up' troops from partly left troops and almost shuttered ones.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by Peter H » 13 Mar 2009 23:13

Thanks hisashi,more clearer now.

Peter

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 17 Mar 2009 17:25

<48th divison>

Until 1944 Taiwan natives were excluded from Japanese draft system, and Taiwanese in IJA was limited to hired civilians until in 1942 IJA accepted volunteer soldiers from Taiwan. Though after 1924 the application to IJA war school from Taiwan and Korea was allowed, no one was accepted. Hong Sa-ik entered the war school while Korea kept her independence.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Sa-ik

On the other hand, IJA maintained two infantry regiments and an artillery regiment for the defense of Taiwan. After 1937 they fought in China as Taiwan Mixed Brigade. 48th division raised in 1940 was a union of that brigade and an infantry regiment from 6th division.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 20 Mar 2009 06:17

<Reinforcement to Manchuria I:permanent station>

Manshu Eikyu Chusatsu (満州永久駐剳 or 満州永久駐箚) was a Japanese phrase used only in this period. It meant IJA stationed some divisions to Manchuria from 1936 to 1940 indefinitely. The enhancement of permanent divisions in Manchuria was according to 1937 plan but somewhat hasted by the bitter battle of Khalkhin Gol in 1939, and the number of divisions scheduled to move was increased from 10(1937 plan) to 13 (1940 plan). It aimed to decrease the movement cost of the divisions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Khalkhin_Gol

The divisional number and the year of move were as follows. 16th division did not go to Manchuria for their use in the Pacific War.

1936: 1 12
1937: 8
1938: 11 23
1939: 24
1940: 9 10 14 25 28
1941: 29
cancelled: 16

<Reinforcement to Manchuria II:new defensive divisions>

The imperial guard division took over the drafting and basic training of 1st divisional district. IJA raised new divisions for the other 7 permanent divisions for the regional defense. Eventually many of them were deployed in various theater leaving their rusu shidan in their base. The correspondence of permanent and new divisionanl numbers were as follows.

14 -> 51
9 -> 52
16 -> 53
10 -> 54
11 -> 55
12 -> 56
8 -> 57

IJA raised most of them in July 1940 but the creation of 53rd delayed to 1941 after 16th departed Kyoto for Philippine invasion. Readers might recall 53rd became a reserve unit of Southern Army in 1943 and fought in Burma.

<Reinforcement to Manchuria III:infantry group>

50s division were planned as backline divisions (there was no official grouping word such as otsu shidan), the barracks left in Japan were too much for them. IJA raised 7 independent infantry group, 61st to 67th. Each of them had 3 IRs. They were a kind of reserve divisions for the training.

Among 7 groups only 65th IIG was deployed independently. In Oct 1941 they received an engineer and a hospital unit and upgraded as 65th brigade. After the fight in Philippine 122nd IR was split for the defense of Marshall Islands. 142nd IR was abolished in Mar 1944 and 141st IR was in Rabaul at the end of war with the rest of the brigade. The last commander of 142nd IR, Colonel Ide Tokutaro was appointed to 80th IR (20th div) isolated in Wewak, so 142nd IR might be reinforced to 20th division.

The other IIGs became a part of divisions raised later.

<Sorting out the regimental district>

Many local interest groups were eager to invite barracks to their neighborhood because it brought huge expense to the local economy. As a result, regimental districts did not coincide with the border of prefectures. In 1941 IJA finally decided to reorganize them simply by allocationg one prefecture to each regiment, and three to five prefectures to a division. 7th division was exceptionally alloted only Hokkaido.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 03 Apr 2009 15:26

<General Defense Headquarter>

In July 1941 IJA raised a general army class HQ, General Defense Headquarter (Boei Soshireibu 防衛総司令部). This HQ retained the authority to give instructions to all aerial HQs in Japan, Korea and Taiwan on anti-aircraft combat. Their commandership was partial and perhaps nominal.


<divisional districts>

In 1941 most of each regimental district coincided with a prefecture, so divisional district became a combination of prefectures.

Shikan (師管) was perhaps an abbrebiation of shidan kanku (divisional district).
This word appeared in the publication of a law in 1873, and those days each shikan was called by the divisional number. For example, daiichi (1st) shikan meant the divisional district for 1st division (Tokyo) as the union of four regimental districts for 1st division.

In 1941 with the reform of regimental districts, IJA formally began to call divisional districts by the location of divisional HQ. The following list was the name of shikan in 1941 (numbers of important divisions are parenthesized ) and the prefectures in it.

Tokyo(1st,Imperial Guards)
Tokyo, Yamanashi,Kanagawa,Saitama,Chiba
Sendai(2nd)
Miyagi,Fukushima,Nigata
Nagoya(3rd)
Aichi,Gifu,Shizuoka
Osaka(4th)
Osaka,Nara,Wakayama
Hiroshima(5th)
Hiroshima,Shimane,Yamaguchi
Kumamoto(6th)
Kumamoto,Oita,Miyazaki,Kagoshima
Hirosaki(8th,57th)
Aomori,Iwate,Akita,Yamagata
Kanazawa(9th,52nd)
Ishikawa,Toyama,Nagano
Zentsuji(11th,55th)
Kagawa,Tokushima,Ehime,Kochi
Kurume(12th,56th)
Fukuoka,Saga,Nagasaki
Utsunomiya(14th,51st)
Tochigi,Ibaraki,Gumma
Kyoto(16th,53rd)
Kyoto,Shiga,Mie,Fukui
Asahikawa(7th)
Hokkaido

Note that the name of shikan was from the name of city, not prefecture. For example, Asahikawa city is on the middle of Hokkaido.

Regimental district office was really a small office only for desk works. On the contrary a divisional HQ or rusu shidan HQ took on the management of divisional district. Even rusu shidan was a training troop/personnel pool using the barracks of their mother division.

In April 1, 1945 IJA redesignated shikan as shikanku HQ. That is, rusu shidan in each shikan became an aerial HQ for the defense by reserve personnels. The word shikanku stresses 'ku(area)' as an aerial HQ.


<Divisions and IMB raised in 1942>

IJA raised seven infantry divisions, three tank divisions and an IMB in 1942. For tank divisions, I once prepared an article elsewhere.

http://maisov.if.tv/m/index.php/Tank_Formations_of_IJA

6 of 7 infantry divisions were hei shidan (only for backline defense in China theater and without artillery elements). Only 71st division had two batteries of mountain guns but it was also for the defense of Manchuria. Most of them was deployed for the defense as planned, though some took part in offensives in China. Most divisions were an upgrade formation from an IMB.

58th from 18th IMB
59th from 10th IMB
60th from 11th IMB
68th from 14th IMB
69th from 16th IMB
70th from 20th IMB
71st from 140th IR split from 110th division

1st independent infantry unit (dokuritsu hoheitai 第1独立歩兵隊) seems raised in August 1937. Perhaps it was a prototype of IMB, 6 infantry battalions in it. 3 of them and newly raised 3 battalions from personnels in China (perhaps soldiers finished two-year service ) consisted of new 22nd IMB. The rest of 1st IIU became Hongkong defense unit.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 04 Apr 2009 05:22

<The situation of infantry divisions in Jan 1943>

IG Sumatra
1 Manchuria
2 Guadalcanal (preparing for retreat)
3 China
4 Japan (returned from Philippines)
5 New Guinea
6 Bouganville
7 Japan (Hokkaido, Sahaline & Kuril) Ichiki Shitai was shuttered in Guadalcanal
8 Manchuria
9 Manchuria
10 Manchuria
11 Manchuria
12 Manchuria
13 China
14 Manchuria
15 China
16 Philippine
17 China
18 Burma
19 Korea
20 Moving from China to New Guinea (Wewak)
21 Vietnum
22 China
23 Manchuria
24 Manchuria
25 Manchuria
26 Mongolia/China
27 China
28 Manchuria
29 Manchuria
32 China
33 Burma
34 China
35 China
36 China
37 China
38 Guadalcanal (preparing for retreat)
39 China
40 China
41 Moving from China to New Guinea (Wewak)
48 Java & Timol
51 Rabaul
52 Japan
53 Japan
54 Japan
55 Burma & New Guinea (half of Nankai Shitai was from 55th ID)
56 Burma
57 Manchuria
58 China
59 China
60 China
68 China
69 China
70 China
71 Manchuria
104 China
110 China
116 China

IJA kept a considerable number of their best (small numbered) divisions in Manchuria and China theater still needed huge manpower resources. As situations in Marshall Islands and New Guinea turned worse, IJA had no choice but to raise new formations in 1943.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 04 Apr 2009 13:19

<divisions upgraded from independent infantry groups>

As mentioned in 1940 IJA raised 61st - 67th independent infantry group which consisted of 3 infantry regiments each. In 1942 divisional numbers 61-67 was skipped for the forthcoming upgrage of those units to division.

Mostly in May 1943 the upgrade was in force but IJA used younger unused numbers. That is,

61st IIG -> 61st division
62nd IIG -> 42nd division
63rd IIG -> 43rd division
64th IIG -> 49th division (upgrade delayed to Jan 1944)
65th IIG -> not upgraded; fought as 65th IIG in New Guinea
66th IIG -> 46th division
67th IIG -> 47th division

<upgrade from IMBs in 1943>

IJA raised the following hei shidan (without artillery) from IMBs in May 1943.

62nd division <- 4th IMB and half of 6th IMB
63rd division <- 15th IMB and half of 6th IMB
64th division <- 12th IMB
65th division <- 13th IMB

<downgrade to hei shidan>

In May 1943, along with the creation of new divisions, IJA disbanded artillery regiments of security divisions in China theater. Several divisions gave up their artillery elements.

<expansion of Imerial Guard division>

In May 1943 IGD in Sumatra was renamed as 2nd IGD. Before the Pacific War IGD dispatched a mixed brigade to China and they returned after IGD departed to southern front. IJA expanded this Imperial Guard Mixed Brigade to new 1st IGD.

<IMBs raised in 1943>

In Jan 1943 IJA raised 23rd IMB in Japan for Southern China. In Nov 1943 IJA raised 11 IMBs (24th to 34th) but among them only 34th was totally new formation. 10 of 12 IMBs raised in 1943 were more or less based on existing garrisons, reserve personnel unit under field army etc.

Most of those formations raised in 1943 were not very good for offensive missions. Some of them were expected to make up the vacancy of other troop sent to the defense in the south and the other were reinforced southern garrisons.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by hisashi » 04 Apr 2009 18:38

<IMBs formed in 1944>

IJA raised 35 IMBs of the following number in 1944.

35 36 37 38 39 40 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 64 65 66 67 69 70 71 72 73

From 1943 the loss of shipment by allied submarine rapidly increased. in each island base many men and equipment remained isolated themselves and in some cases only a small part of larger formation arrived in time. Simplifying the chain of command, IJA bound troops in an island into an IMB for the defense. Similarly, many nearly shuttered formations in Rabaul were reorganized into 38th IMB(Bougenvalle), 39th(Rabaul) and 40th(New Ireland). As it had been, many of those IMBs were reinforced garrison troops.

Among them only those IMBs were totally new troop formed in Japan.
44th & 45th (to Okinawa)
46th (to Taiwan, mostly sunk by sub attack)
54th (to Philippine, finally Mindanao Island)
55th (to Philippine, finally Jolo Island)
55th (to Philippine, finally Jolo Island)
57th (to Sulawesi Island)
61st (to Babuyan Islands)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babuyan_Islands
64th (to Tokunoshima Island nearby Okinawa)

59th and 60th consisted of pewrsonnels served in Manchuria and sent to Miyakojima Island nearby Okinawa.

<divisions formed in 1944>

Including 96th division raised in Feb 1945, in 1944 IJA raised 30 new divisions. They were defensive formations and any of them did not move so far. The following table shows the location they were in August 1945.

3rd Imperial Guards division <- Chiba pref.
66th division <- Taiwan (from 46th IMB)
72nd division <- Fukushima pref.(mobile reserve)
73rd division <- West half of Shizuoka pref.
77th division <- west Hokkaido, later moved to Kagoshima pref.
79th division <- Soviet Border of North Korea
81th division <- Ibaraki pref.(mobile reserve)
84th division <- Kanagawa pref.(perhaps mobile reserve)
86th division <- Kagoshima pref.
88th division <- Sahalin (from troops in Sahalin)
89th division <- southern half of Kuril (from 43rd & 69th IMBs etc.)
91st division <- northern half of Kuril
93rd division <- Chiba pref. (mobile reserve)
94th division <- Thailand & Malaysia
96th division <- Jeju Island (Korea) delayed to Feb 1945
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeju-do
100th division <- Mindanao, Philippine (from 30th IMB)
102th division <- Cebu, Philippine (from 31th IMB)
103rd division <- Davao, Philippine (from 32nd IMB)
105th division <- Luzon, Philippine (from 33nd IMB)
107th division <- Manchuria
108th division (rebuilt) <- Manchuria
109th division (rebuilt) <- Chichijima & Iwojima (from Chichijima garrisons)
111th division <- Manchuria, later Jeju Island
112th division <- Manchuria
114th division (rebuilt) <- China
115th division <- China (from 7th IMB)
117th division <- China, later Manchuria
118th division <- Mongolia&China
119th division <- Manchuria
120th division <- Manchuria

72-93 divisions were from reserve personnels in Japan. Many of the other divisions lacked good resource pool and merely a mixture of small troops, far from standard of ordinal divisions.

I once showed how Kuribayashi's 109th division relied on various personnel pool. His division was extraordinary important for IJA and perhaps many of defensive divisions created in 1944 had much less firepower.
viewtopic.php?f=65&t=91386&start=0

Even if they were understrength divisions, it was worth forming them for the simplification of command structure, rather than depending on 'cooperation' of troops not in the same chain of command.

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Re: IJA divisions: an overview

Post by Peter H » 05 Apr 2009 00:44

hisashi wrote:<The situation of infantry divisions in Jan 1943>

IG Sumatra
1 Manchuria
2 Guadalcanal (preparing for retreat)
3 China
4 Japan (returned from Philippines)
5 New Guinea
6 Bouganville
7 Japan (Hokkaido, Sahaline & Kuril) Ichiki Shitai was shuttered in Guadalcanal
8 Manchuria
9 Manchuria
10 Manchuria
11 Manchuria
12 Manchuria
13 China
14 Manchuria
15 China
16 Philippine
17 China
18 Burma
19 Korea
20 Moving from China to New Guinea (Wewak)
21 Vietnum
22 China
23 Manchuria
24 Manchuria
25 Manchuria
26 Mongolia/China
27 China
28 Manchuria
29 Manchuria
32 China
33 Burma
34 China
35 China
36 China
37 China
38 Guadalcanal (preparing for retreat)
39 China
40 China
41 Moving from China to New Guinea (Wewak)
48 Java & Timol
51 Rabaul
52 Japan
53 Japan
54 Japan
55 Burma & New Guinea (half of Nankai Shitai was from 55th ID)
56 Burma
57 Manchuria
58 China
59 China
60 China
68 China
69 China
70 China
71 Manchuria
104 China
110 China
116 China

IJA kept a considerable number of their best (small numbered) divisions in Manchuria and China theater still needed huge manpower resources. As situations in Marshall Islands and New Guinea turned worse, IJA had no choice but to raise new formations in 1943.


Thanks hisashi

Summary of regions deployed as follows.The large number of divisions on the Asian mainland(Manchuria,China) is still apparent at this date.

Japan-5
Korea-1
China-23
Manchuria-14
SWP/New Guinea-7
Indochina-1
Burma-4
Philippines-1
Dutch East Indies-2

Total 58 Divs

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