Japanese Trials

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ansata1976
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 14 Jul 2009 19:27

Masaharu Homma ( Honma Masaharu, 27 November 1887 – 3 April 1946) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army. He is noteworthy for his role in the invasion and occupation of the Philippines during World War II. Homma, who was an amateur painter and playwright, was also known as the Poet General.

Homma was born on Sado Island, in the Sea of Japan off of Niigata Prefecture. He graduated from the 14th class of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy in 1907, and from the 27th class of the Army Staff College in 1915. Homma had a deep respect for and some understanding of the West, having spent eight years as a military attaché in the United Kingdom, including serving in combat in World War I in France in 1918 with the British Expeditionary Force.From 1930-1932, Homma was again sent as a military attaché to the United Kingdom, where his proficiency in the English language was useful. He was also assigned to be part of the Japanese delegation to the Geneva Disarmament Conference in 1932 and served with the Press Section of the Army Ministry from 1932-1933. He was given a field command again, as commander of the IJA 1st Infantry Regiment from 1933–1935, and was promoted to command the IJA 32nd Infantry Brigade from 1935-1936.In 1937, Homma was appointed aide-de-camp to Prince Chichibu, a brother of Emperor Shōwa. With him, he made a diplomatic tour in Europe which ended in Germany. There he attended the Nuremberg rally and met Adolf Hitler, with whom the prince tried to boost relations, following the Anti-Comintern Pact of 1936.With the start of the Second Sino-Japanese War, Homma was appointed commander of the IJA 27th Division in China from 1938-1940 and directed the blockade of the foreign concessions in Tientsin, where he led the negotiations with the British. After the fall of Nanking, he declared publicly that "unless peace is achieved immediately it will be disastrous". Homma was removed from his position at the front lines, and re-assigned to become commander in chief of the Taiwan Army District from 1940-1941. He was promoted to lieutenant general in July 1938.With the start of the Pacific War, Homma was named commander of the 43,110 man IJA 14th Army and tasked with the invasion of the Philippines. He ordered his troops to treat the Filipinos not as enemies but as friends, and respect their customs and religion. In one instance, on his approach to Manila, Homma stopped his columns and ordered the men to clean up and tighten formations, knowing that unkempt soldiers are more likely to loot and rape.This liberal approach towards Filipino civilians earned him the enmity of his superior, General Count Hisaichi Terauchi, commander of the Southern Army, who sent adverse reports about Homma to Tokyo from his headquarters in Saigon. There was also a growing subversion within Homma's command by a small group of insubordinates, under the influence of Colonel Tsuji Masanobu. In Homma's name, they sent out secret orders against his policies, including ordering the execution of Filipino Chief Justice Jose Abad Santos and attempted execution of former Speaker of the House of Representatives Manuel Roxas, which Homma found out about in time to stop.Homma failed to give credence to the possibility that a retreat into Bataan Peninsula by Filipino-American forces might succeed in upsetting the Japanese timetable. By the time he recognized his mistake, his best infantry division had been replaced by a poorly trained reserve brigade, greatly weakening his assault force. Rather than waste his men in furious frontal assaults, he tried to outmaneuver the American forces. This brought criticism from superiors who believed he had been “contaminated” by Western ideas about conserving the lives of his men.Worried about the stalled offensive in Luzon, Emperor Shōwa pressed Army Chief of Staff Hajime Sugiyama twice on January 1942 to increase troop strength and launch a quick knockout on Bataan. Following these orders, Sugiyama put pressure on Homma to renew his attacks. The resulting Battle of Bataan commencing in January 1942 was one of the most intense in the campaign. However, the deteriorating relationship between Homma and Sugiyama led to the removal of Homma from command shortly after the fall of Corregidor, and he was thereafter commander of the 14th Army in name only.The Imperial General Headquarters regarded Homma as not aggressive enough in war (resulting in the high cost and long delay in securing the American and Filipino forces' surrender), and too lenient with the Filipino people in peace, and he was subsequently forced into retirement, in August 1943. Homma retired from the military and lived in semi-seclusion in Japan until the end of the war. Homma was convicted by the U.S. military tribunal for war crimes in the Philippines, including the Bataan Death March, and the atrocities at O'Donnell and Cabanatuan which followed. Homma's chief defense counsel, John H. Skeen Jr., stated that in his opinion it was a "highly irregular trial, conducted in an atmosphere that left no doubt as to what the ultimate outcome would be." Associate Justice Frank Murphy of the U.S. Supreme Court protested the verdict, stating: "Either we conduct such a trial as this in the noble spirit and atmosphere of our Constitution or we abandon all pretense to justice, let the ages slip away and descend to the level of revengeful blood purges."Homma's wife appealed to General MacArthur to spare his life; her pleas were denied, though according to William Manchester in American Caesar, he ordered Homma shot, rather than sent to the gallows, the latter being considered the greater dishonor amongst military men. Homma was executed by firing squad by the Filipino and American forces on 3 April 1946 outside Manila.




General Tomoyuki Yamashita ( Yamashita Tomoyuki, 8 November 1885 - 23 February 1946) was a general of the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. He was most famous for conquering the British colonies of Malaya and Singapore, earning the nickname "The Tiger of Malaya".

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Yamashita was born the son of a local doctor in Osugi village, in what is now part of Ōtoyo village, Kōchi prefecture, Shikoku. He attended military preparatory schools in his youth. After graduating from the 18th class of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy in 1905, Yamashita joined the Imperial Japanese Army in 1906 and fought against the Germans in Shantung, China in 1914. He attended the 28th class of the Army War College, graduating sixth in his class in 1916. He married Hisako Nagayama, the daughter of retired General Nagayama in 1916. Yamashita became an expert on Germany, serving as assistant military attaché at Bern, Switzerland and Berlin Germany from 1919-1922.On his return to Japan in 1922, Yamashita served in the Imperial Headquarters and the Staff College. While posted to the Imperial Japanese Army General Staff, Yamashita unsuccessfully promoted a military reduction plan. Despite his ability, Yamashita fell into disfavor as a result of his involvement with adverse political factions within the Japanese military. As a leading member of the "Imperial Way" group, he became a rival to Hideki Tojo and other members of the "Control Faction".In 1928, Yamashita was posted to Vienna, Austria as the military attache. In 1930, Colonel Yamashita was given command of the 3rd Imperial Infantry Regiment, one of the strongest in the Japanese armyAfter the February 26 Incident of 1936, he also fell into disfavor with Emperor Hirohito due to his appeal for leniency toward the rebel officers involved in the attempted coup. On 6 November 1941, Yamashita was put in command of the Twenty-Fifth Army. On 8 December, he launched an invasion of Malaya, from bases in French Indochina. In the campaign, which concluded with the fall of Singapore on 15 February 1942, Yamashita's 30,000 front-line soldiers captured 130,000 British, Indian and Australian troops, the largest surrender of British-led personnel in history. He became known as the "Tiger of Malaya".The campaign and the subsequent Japanese occupation of Singapore included war crimes committed against captive Allied personnel and civilians, such as the Alexandra Hospital and Sook Ching Massacres. Yamashita's culpability for these events remains a matter of controversy, as some argued that he had failed to prevent them. However, Yamashita had the officer who instigated the hospital massacre and some soldiers caught looting executed for these acts, and he personally apologised to the surviving patients. On 17 July 1942, Yamashita was reassigned from Singapore to far-away Manchukuo, again having been given a post in commanding the Japanese First Army, and was effectively sidelined for a major part of the Pacific War.It is thought that Prime Minister Hideki Tōjō was responsible for his banishment, taking advantage of Yamashita's gaffe during a speech made to Singaporean civilian leaders in early 1942, when he referred to the local populace as "citizens of the Empire of Japan". This was considered embarrassing for the Japanese government, who officially did not consider the residents of occupied territories to have the rights or privileges of Japanese citizenship. In 1944, when the war situation was critical for Japan, Yamashita assumed the command of the Fourteenth Area Army to defend the Philippines on 10 October. The U.S. Army landed on Leyte on 20 October, only ten days after Yamashita's arrival at Manila. On 6 January 1945 the Sixth U.S. Army landed at Lingayen Gulf in Luzon.Yamashita commanded approximately 262,000 troops in three defensive groups. He tried to rebuild his army but was forced to retreat from Manila to the mountains of northern Luzon. Yamashita ordered all troops, except those tasked with security, out of the city.Almost immediately, Rear Admiral Sanji Iwabuchi re-occupied Manila with 16,000 sailors, with the intent of destroying all port facilities and naval storehouses. Once there, Iwabuchi took command of the 3,750 Army security troops, and against Yamashita's specific order, turned the city into a battlefield.The actions of the Japanese garrison resulted in the deaths of more than 100,000 Filipino civilians, in what would be later known as the Manila Massacre, during the fierce street fighting for the capital which raged from February 4 to March 3. The court found Yamashita guilty as charged and sentenced him to death. Clarke appealed the sentence to MacArthur, who upheld it. He then appealed to the Philippine Supreme Court and the United States Supreme Court, both of which declined to review the verdict. As a consequence, Yamashita was executed on 23 February 1946.


Akira Mutō ( Mutō Akira, 15 December 1892 - 23 December 1948) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II.

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Mutō was a native of Kumamoto prefecture, and a graduate of the 25th class of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy in 1913. He graduated from the 32nd class of the Army Staff College in 1920. Mutō was assigned as a military attaché to Germany from 1923-1926. On his return to Japan, he served in various administrative and staff positions within the Imperial Army General Staff Office.Mutō was on the strategic planning staff of the General Staff Office in 1935, and was chief of the military intelligence section of the Kwangtung Army at the time of the Marco Polo Bridge Incident. He is believed to have been one of the planners behind the incident which sparked the Second Sino-Japanese War.[1][2] Promoted to Vice Chief of Staff of the Japanese Central China Area Army, Mutō was in China for many of the initial campaigns of the conflict, and was later charged with having led troops during the worst excesses of the Nanjing Massacre.Mutō was recalled to Japan in 1939, promoted to major general in 1939, and served on the Military Affairs Bureau of the Ministry of War.Promoted to lieutenant general just prior to the start of the Pacific War, Mutō served as director of the Military Affairs Bureau at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was assigned command of the Second Imperial Guards Division at Singapore in April 1942. He was later assigned to command Japanese forces on Sumatrain Japanese -occupied Netherlands East Indies from June 1944, and was transferred to the Philippines in October 1944, where he was appointed chief of staff of the Japanese Fourteenth Area Army under General Tomoyuki Yamashita.Acting insubordinately, he refused Yamashita's orders to abandon Manila after the landings of Allied forces on Luzon, and during the resulting Battle of Manila was accused of having conducted a campaign of slaughter, torture and other atrocities against the Filipino civilian population, prisoners of war and civilian internees.After the surrender of Japan, Mutō was arrested by the American occupation authorities and charged with war crimes before the International Military Tribunal for the Far East. He was convicted for atrocities against civilians and prisoners of war in both China and the Philippines, and was executed by hanging on 23 December 1948.


Heitarō Kimura ( Kimura Heitarō (sometimes Kimura Hyōtarō), 28 September 1888 - 23 December 1948) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army.

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Kimura was born in Saitama prefecture, north of Tokyo, but was raised in Hiroshima prefecture, which he considered to be his home. He attended military schooling from an early age, and graduated from the Imperial Japanese Army Academy in 1908. He went on to graduate from the Army War College in 1916 and was commissioned into the artillery. He served during the Japanese Siberian Intervention of 1918-1919 in support of White Russian forces against the Bolshevik Red Army. He was subsequently sent as a military attache to Germany.From the late 1920s Kimura was attached to the Inspectorate of Artillery and an instructor at the Field Artillery School. He was selected as a member of the Japanese delegation to the London Disarmament Conference from 1929 to 1931. On his return to Japan, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel and assigned command of the IJA 22nd Artillery Regiment. From 1932-1934, he returned to the Field Artillery School, followed by the Coastal Artillery School as an instructor.In 1935, Kimura first served in an influential role close to the centre of Japanese policy when he was appointed Chief of the Control Section in the Economic Mobilisation Bureau at the Ministry of War. The next year, he was appointed Head of the Ordnance Bureau. He was promoted to the rank of major general in 1936. He became a lieutenant general in 1939, and was assigned a combat command with the IJA 32nd Division in China from 1939-1940. From 1940-1941, Kimura served as Chief of Staff of the Kwangtung Army in Manchukuo.Kimura returned to the Ministry of War in 1941 as Vice Minister of War, assisting War Minister Hideki Tojo in planning strategies for campaigns in the Second Sino-Japanese War as well as the Pacific War. From 1943 to 1944 he was a member of the Supreme War Council, where he continued to exert a major influence on strategy and policy.Late in 1944, as the course of the war went against Japan after the disastrous Battle of Imphal, Kimura was again assigned to the field, this time as commander in chief of the Burma Area Army, defending Burma against the Allied South East Asia Command. The situation was not promising as Japanese forces were under severe pressure on every front, and the Allies had complete air superiority. Reinforcements and munitions were short, and Imperial General Headquarters entertained the unsupported hope that Kimura would be able make his command logistically self-sufficient.Unable to defend all of Burma, Kimura fell back behind the Irrawaddy River to attack the Allies when their supply lines were stretched thin - a move which initially dislocated the Allied plans. Unfortunately, such was Allied material superiority that the main weight of the offensive was switched, and the vital positions of Meiktila and Mandalay were captured at the Battle of Meiktila and Mandalay. From that point, Kimura was only capable of delaying actions.He opted to preserve his forces rather than defend the capital, Rangoon to the last man. Promoted to the rank of general in 1945, he was still reorganising his forces at the surrender of Japan in mid-1945.After the end of World War II, Kimura was arrested by the Allied occupation powers and tried by the International Military Tribunal for the Far East for war crimes. The tribunal cited his role in planning the strategy for the war in China and Southeast Asia, and condemned him for laxity in preventing atrocities against prisoners of war in Burma. Although the Death Railway was built from 1942-1943, and Kimura did not arrive in Burma until late 1944, Kimura was also charged with the abuse and deaths of the military and civilian prisoners used to construct the railroad.Found guilty in 1948 on Counts 1, 27, 29, 31, 32, 54 and 55, of the indictment he was condemned to death by the International Military Tribunal for the Far East and hanged as a war criminal.


Takuma Nishimura ( Nishimura Takuma, 1 September 1899 – 11 June 1951) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II. He was later tried by the Allies for war crimes, and was executed. However, doubt has been cast on Nishimura's guilt.

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He was a graduate of the 22nd class of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy in 1910, and subsequently attended Army Engineering School. He graduated from the 32nd class of the Army Staff College in 1920. He served most of his career in various staff and administrative posts within the Imperial Japanese Army General Staff.Nishimura served as presiding judge at the court-martial of army officers responsible for the assassination of Prime Minister Inukai Tsuyoshi in 1932 (the May 15 Incident). The defendants all received light sentences. (For this he was apparently rewarded later with command of the Imperial Guards Division, a prestigious posting.)From 1936-1938, Nishimura was commander of the 9th Infantry Regiment, and from 1938-1939 commanded the 1st Heavy Field Artillery Brigade. He became Chief of Staff of the Eastern Defense Army from 1939-1940. Promoted to Major General in 1940, Nishimura was commander of the Indochina Expeditionary Army in the invasion of French Indochina in 1940. Nishimura was promoted to Lieutenant General in 1941. After the end of the war, Nishimura was tried by a British military tribunal in Singapore for the events related to the Sook Ching massacre. He was found guilty of war crimes, and was sentenced to life imprisonment, of which he served four years in Singapore before being sent back to Tokyo to complete his sentence.As he was being repatriated to Japan, Nishimura was forcibly removed from a ship at Hong Kong, by Australian military police and brought before an Australian military tribunal on Manus Island, where he was charged with events on connection to the Parit Sulong massacre. Evidence was presented stating that Nishimura had ordered the shootings at Parit Sulong and the destruction of bodies. Nishimura was found guilty and was executed by hanging on 12 June 1951.


Naomasa Sakonju (Sakonjō Naomasa, 6 June 1890 – 21 January 1948) was an admiral in the Imperial Japanese Navy in World War II.

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A native of Kagoshima Prefecture, Sakonju was a graduate of the 40th class of the Imperial Japanese Navy Academy in 1912, placing 98th in a class of 144. He served his midshipman tour on the cruiser Soya, and battleship Suwo, and after commissioning as an ensign was assigned to Hashidate.As a sub-lieutenant he served on the Kasuga, Niitaka, Azuma, and destroyer Harukaze.After his promotion to lieutenant on 1 December 1919, he was assigned to the Tenryū, served a year as communications officer on Chichijima in the Ogasawara Islands, and returned to serve as communications officer on Mutsu, and seaplane tender Wakamiya. He was promoted to lieutenant commander in 1930, and was executive officer of the Kako in 1933. He held numerous staff positions thereafter, including that of naval attaché to Thailand from 1 September 1941.He was promoted to rear admiral on 15 October 1941, and continued to remain in Thailand until June 1942.He was assigned as commanding officer of the Cruiser Division 16 in September 1942, with the heavy cruiser Tone as his flagship. CruDiv16 played an important during many naval battles of World War II.In March 1944 CruDiv 16 was engaged in attacking Allied shipping sailing between Aden and Fremantle. The 6,100 ton British steamer MV Behar, crewed mostly by Indian seamen, was sunk about midway between Ceylon and Fremantle on 9 March 1944. Following this attack the squadron broke off its mission and returned to Batavia, as it was feared that Allied ships responding to the Behar's distress signal posed an unacceptable risk. Tone took 114 survivors aboard, but was unable to land the prisoners at Batavia as new orders had been received from Tokyo that no further prisoners were to be taken in combat operations other than those needed for interrogation. When Sakonju protested that the prisoners could not very well be kept aboard Tone for the duration of the war, he was advised that they should be "desposed of". Ten days later, Tone's captain Haruo Mayuzumi ordered the prisoners to line up on the aircraft deck. Apparently randomly, Mayuzumi selected from 52-72 men (accounts vary), and ordered them shot on the fantail after they refused the honor of death by sword, and pitched the bodies into the Indian Ocean. Those killed included 10 of 14 officers on the MV Behar, and most of the Royal Navy crew.Promoted to vice admiral on 15 October 1944, Sakonju became chief of staff of the China Area Fleet, remaining in that post until the war's end in 1945.In 1946, Sakonju was arrested by the American occupation authorities and extradited to Hong Kong, where he was charged with war crimes by a British military tribunal over his role in the murder of the survivors of the Behar. Mayuzumi did not survive the war, but Sakonju, took responsibility in his 1947 affidavit. “In view of the fact that the Allies are lately killing Japanese prisoners of war at Guadalcanal by running tanks over them and are often bombing and torpedoing Japanese hospital ships, causing many casualties, the H.Q. came to a conclusion that the Allies are aiming at the reduction of Japan's manpower, and H.Q. decided to retaliate.”Sakonju was executed in 1948.


Baba Masao (1892-1947) was a Lieutenant-General of the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II, commanding the Japanese ground forces of the Borneo Campaign of 1945 in the closing months of the war. The campaign would be the last major Allied offensive of the war in the South West Pacific Area. After the war ended, he was tried for war crimes and hanged as a war criminal.

1933 - 1935 Attached to the Inspectorate of Cavalry
1935 - 1938 Commanding Officer 2nd Cavalry Regiment
1938 - 1939 Commanding Officer 3rd Cavalry Brigade
1939 - 1940 Attached to the Inspectorate of Cavalry
1940 - 1941 General Officer Commanding Cavalry Group
1941 - 1943 General Officer Commanding 53rd Division
1943 - 1944 General Officer Commanding 4th Division, Sumatra
1944 - 1945 General Officer Commanding 37th Army, Borneo
1947 Condemned to death and hanged as war criminal
Last edited by ansata1976 on 20 Jul 2009 16:08, edited 1 time in total.

ansata1976
Member
Posts: 4934
Joined: 18 Jan 2009 18:51
Location: At home

Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 14 Jul 2009 22:33

Juu, Major-General
( – 1946)
1937 – 1939 Commanding Officer 1st Taiwan Reserve Regiment
1939 – 1941 Chief of Ordnance Section 24th Division
1941 – 1945 Commanding Officer 17th Regiment
Condemned to death as a war criminal and
1946 Executed


Fukei
Shinpei
, Lieutenant-General
( – 1946)
1935 – 1937 Attached to Kwantung Army
1937 – 1939 Commanding Officer 61st Regiment
1939 – 1940 Attached to 16th Depot Division
1940 – 1942 Commanding Officer 15th Brigade
1942 Commandant of Prisoner of War Camps Malaya
1942 – 1943 Commandant of Shimonoseki Fortress
1943 – 1944 Commandant of Tokyo Bay Fortress
1944 – 1945 General Officer Commanding 102nd Division, Philippines
1946 Condemned to death and executed as war criminal


Harada
Kumakichi
, Lieutenant-General
(1888 – 1947)
1931 – 1932 Resident Officer in Nanjing, China
1932 Resident Officer in Shanghai, China
1932 – 1935 Chief of Rear Area Section Kwantung Army
1935 – 1937 Commanding Officer 4th Imperial Guards Regiment
1937 – 1938 Military Attaché to China
1938 – 1939 Chief of Intelligence Section Central China Expeditionary Army, China
1939 – 1940 Governmental Adviser to Central China Expeditionary Army, China
1940 – 1942 General Officer Commanding 35th Division
1942 General Officer Commanding 27th Division
1942 – 1945 General Officer Commanding 16th Army, Java
1945 General Officer Commanding 55th Army
1945 Commander in Chief Shikoku Army District
1947 Condemned to death as a war crimina


Hirano
Giichi
, Major-General
(1890 – 1947)
1940 – 1943 Commanding Officer 63rd Independent Battalion
1943 – 1945 Commanding Officer 36th Regiment
1945 Attached to 23rd Army Headquarters
1945 Commanding Officer 92nd Brigade
1947 Executed, China
Kaburagi
Masataka, Major-General
(1897 – 1946)
1939 – 1940 Attached to 13th Division
1940 – 1942 Senior Staff Officer Mongolian Garrison Army
1942 – 1943 Attached to the Military Academy
1943 – 1944 Instructor at the Military Academy
1944 Attached to 11th Army Headquarters
1944 – 1945 Chief of Staff 34th Army, China
1945 Chief of Staff 55th Army
1945 Chief of Staff Shikoku Army District
1945 Chief of Staff Shikoku Army District
1946 Condemned to death and executed as war criminal


Kawamura
Saburo,
Lieutenant-General
(1896 – 1947)
1937 – 1938 Attached to the General Staff
1938 – 1939 Attached to North China Area Army Headquarters
1939 – 1941 Chief of Military Affairs Section, Military Affairs Bureau, Ministry of War
1941 Commanding Officer 213th Regiment
1941 – 1942 Commanding Officer 9th Brigade
1942 – 1944 Chief of Staff Indochina Garrison Army
1944 – 1945 Chief of Staff 38th Army, Indochina
1945 General Officer Commanding 224th Division
1945 Chief of Staff 59th Army
1945 Chief of Staff Chugoku Army District
1946 – 1947 Arrested and tried as war criminal
1947 Condemned to death and hanged as war criminal



Kawane
Ryoken
, Major-General
(1881 – 1949
1936 – 1939 Commanding Officer 2nd Transport Regiment
1939 – 1941 Commandant of Kurume Army Reserve Officers' Cadet School
1941 – 1942 Commanding Officer 3rd Field Transportation Command
1942 – 1945 Commanding Officer Northern China Field Motor Transport Depot
1945 – 1949 Prisoner of War, China
1949 Executed following an attempted escape, China








Kondo
Shinpachi
, Lieutenant-General
(1893 – 1947)
1938 – 1939 Head of the Military Police (Kempeitai) Houten
1939 – 1940 Head of the Military Police (Kempeitai) Keijo (Seoul)
1942 – 1943 Chief of Staff 37th Division
1943 – 1944 Chief of Staff Taiwan Army District
1944 – 1945 Commanding Officer 19th Independent Mixed Brigade, China
1945 General Officer Commanding 130th Division
1947 Executed, China


Kono
Takeshi,
Lieutenant-General
( – 1947)
1937 – 1938 Commanding Officer 9th Independent Defence Battalion
1938 – 1941 Commanding Officer 17th Regiment
1941 Attached to 7th Division
1941 – 1943 Commanding Officer Infantry Group 40th Division
1943 Commanding Officer 11th Indepent Garrison Unit
1943 – 1944 Commanding Officer 31st Independent Mixed Brigade
1944 – 1945 Commanding Officer 77th Brigade, Philippines
1947 Condemned to death and executed as war crimal

Kou
Shiyoku
, Lieutenant-General
(1889 – 1946)
1939 – 1940 Attached to China Expedtionary Army
1940 – 1941 Attached to 1st Depot Division
1941 – 1942 Commanding Officer 108th Brigade
1942 - 1944 Attached to the Noncommisioned Officers' School
1944 Head of Prisoner of War Camps Philippines
1944 – 1945 Inspector of Prisoner of War Camps 14th Area Army, Philippines
1946 Condemned to death as a war criminal
1946 Hanged


Okada
Tasuke
, Lieutenant-General
(1890 – 1949)
1933 - 1935 Instructor at the War College
1935 - 1937 Commanding Officer 80th Regiment
1937 - 1938 Chief of Staff 4th Division
1938 – 1939 Commanding Officer 8th Brigade
1939 – 1940 Commandant of the Army Tank School
1940 – 1942 Commanding Officer Sagami Army Arsenal
1940 – 1942 Instructor at Army Tank School
1942 – 1943 General Officer Commanding 2nd Tank Division
1943 – 1945 Comptroller of Tokai Military Stores Department
1945 Commander in Chief 13th Area Army
1945 General Officer Commanding Tokai Army District
1945 Retired
1946 – 1949 Arrested as a B class war criminal
1949 Condemned to death an executed



Sai
Toshio
, Major-General
( – 1946)
1939 – 1941 Commanding Officer 57th Regiment
1941 – 1943 Commanding Officer Wakayama Regimental District
1943 Commanding Officer North Chishima Garrision
1943 – 1944 Commanding Officer Infantry Group 2nd Division
1944 – 1945 Commanding Officer 36th Independent Mixed Brigade
1946 Condemned to death as a war criminal and Executed



Sasa
Makoto
, Major-General
( – 1948)
1935 – 1937 Commanding Officer 4th Air Regiment
1937 Commanding Officer 8th Air Battalion
1937 – 1939 Director of Shimoshidzu Army Aviation School
1939 – 1940 Commanding Officer 2nd Air Group
1940 – 1941 Attached to Central Army Headquarters
1941 – 1942 Chief of Administration Section Central Army
1942 – 1943 Chief of Prisoner of War Camps Siam, Thailand
1943 Attached to Central Army Headquarters
1943 Retired
1948 Condemned to death as a war criminal
1948 Executed by hanging



Sato
Tamenori
, Major-General
(1893 – 1946)

1938 – 1940 Commanding Officer 73rd Regiment
1940 – 1941 Senior Adjutant Kwantung Army
1941 – 1943 Attached to 53rd Division Headquarters
1943 – 1944 Commanding Officer Infantry Group 15th Division
1944 – 1945 Commanding Officer 37th Independent Mixed Brigade, Nicobar Islands
1945 Commanding Officer 35th Independent Mixed Brigade
1946 Condemned to death as a war criminal
1946 Executed by hanging


Shigeto
Norifumi
, Major-General
(1895 – 1947)
1938 – 1940 Head of the Military Police (Kempeitai) Nagoya
1940 – 1942 Attached to Military Police (Kempeitai) Section, Central China Expeditionary Army
1942 – 1945 Head of the Military Police (Kempeitai) Southern China Expeditionary Army
1945 Head of the Military Police (Kempeitai) Northern China Area Army
1947 Condembed to death as a war criminal
1947 Executed, China



Tachihana
Yoshio
, Lieutenant-General
( – 1947)
1938 – 1939 Military Advisor to Manchuko
1939 – 1942 Commanding Officer 65th Regiment
1942 – 1944 Commanding Officer Hiroshima Regimental District
1944 – 1945 Commanding Officer 1st Mixed Brigade
1945 General Officer Commanding 109th Division
1947 Condemned to death as a war criminal and executed


Tagami
Hachiro
, Lieutenant-General
(1891 – 1948)
1937 – 1938 Comanding Officer 34th Regiment
1938 – 1940 Chief of Staff 11th Division
1940 Attached to 20th Division
1940 – 1941 Commanding Officer 40th Brigade
1941 Commanding Officer 45th Brigade
1941 – 1942 Commanding Officer 17th Independent Mixed Brigade
1942 – 1943 Director of Noncommissioned Officers' School
1943 – 1945 General Officer Commanding 36th Division, Moluccas
1948 Condemned to death as a war criminal and executed


Tajima
Hikotaro
, Lieuteant-General
(1894 – 1946)
1937 – 1938 Staff Officer 8th Division
1938 – 1939 Commanding Officer 9th Cavalry Regiment
1939 – 1941 Chief of Staff 41st Division
1941 - 1943 Head of Special Agency Northern China Area Army
1943 – 1944 Commanding Officer 3rd Cavalry Brigade
1944 – 1945 Commanding Officer 61st Independent Mixed Brigade
1944 – 1945 Commanding Officer Batan Island Garrison, Philippines
1946 Condemned to death as a war criminal
1946 Executed


Tanabe
Moritake
, Lieutenant-General
(1889 – 1949)
Image
1933 – 1934 Instructor of the Toyama Army Infantry School
1934 – 1936 Chief of Mobilization Section, Economic Mobilization Bureau, Ministry of War
1936 – 1937 Commanding Officer 34th Regiment
1937 Director of the Toyama Army Infantry School
1937 – 1938 Chief of Staff 10th Army
1938 – 1939 Commandant of the Tank School
1939 – 1941 General Officer Commanding 41st Division
1941 Chief of Staff Northern China Area Army
1941 – 1943 Vice Chief General Staff
1942 Temporay Head of 3rd Bureau, General Staff
1943 – 1945 General Officer Commanding 25th Army, Sumatra
1945 – 1949 Arrested and tried as a war criminal
1949 Condemned to death and executed as a war criminal


Tanaka
Hisakazu
, Lieutenant-General
(1889 – 1947)
1933 – 1935 Instructor at the Toyama Army Infantry School
1935 – 1937 Commanding Officer 1st Imperial Guards Regiment
1937 – 1938 Instructor at the War College
1938 Chief of Staff Taiwan Army District
1938 – 1939 Chief of Staff 21st Army
1939 – 1940 Commandant of the Toyama Army Infantry School
1940 – 1943 General Officer Commanding 21st Division
1943 – 1945 General Officer Commanding 23rd Army, China
1944 – 1945 Governor-General of Hong Kong
1946 Arrested and tried as a war criminal
1946 Condemned to death as a war criminal
1947 Executed, China


Tanaka
Toro
, Major-General
( – 1948)
1941 Commanding Officer 2nd Taiwan Reserve Regiment
1941 – 1945 Commanding Officer 2nd Taiwan Regiment, China
1948 Executed, China


Tani
Hisao
, Lieutenant-General
(1882 – 1947)
Image
1922 – 1924 Attached to 6th Regiment
1924 Instructor at the War College
1924 – 1927 Attached to the General Staff
1927 – 1928 Commanding Officer 6th Regiment
1928 – 1929 Chief of Staff 3rd Depot Division
1929 Chief of 9th Section (Military History), 4th Bureau, General Staff
1929 – 1930 Chief of 8th Section (Training), 4th Bureau, General Staff
1930 Member of the Committee on an unified Air Force, General Staff
1930 – 1932 Attached to the General Staff
1932 – 1933 Chairman of Military Investigation, Ministry of War
1933 – 1934 Commanding Officer 2nd Imperial Guards Brigade
1934 – 1935 Commandant of Tokyo Bay Fortress
1935 General Officer Commanding 9th Depot Division
1935 – 1937 General Officer Commanding 6th Division, China
1937 – 1939 Commander in Chief Central Defence Army
1939 In reserve
1939 Retired
1945 Recalled
1945 General Officer Commanding 59th Army
1945 Commander in Chief Chugoku Army District
1947 Condemned to death and executed as war criminal


Chen Yi (1893-1950)
Chen Yi was born in Chekiang province and was a graduate of the Japanese Army Staff College. He likely commanded 25 Army Group when war broke out in the Pacific.
Service record
1883 Born
1915 Japanese Army Staff College
1926 Governor, Chekiang Province
1929 Vice-minister of war
1934 Chairman, Fukien Province
1938 Director, Fukien Pacification Headquarters
1940 General Commander, 25 Army Group

1942 Secretary-general, Party and Government Work Evaluation Committee
1944 Acting commandant, Staff College
1944 Director, Central Training Institute
1945 Governor-general, Taiwan
1948 Chairman, Chekiang Province
1949 Arrested for treason
1950 Executed




Mori Kunizo (1890-1949)
Mori Kunizo commanded the Kurile Islands Special Naval Base Force in May 1944, was promoted to vice admiral, and commanded naval forces in the Bonins at the end of the war. He was executed for cannibalism of American airmen on Chichi Jima, and was also implicated in the cannibalism of captured airmen at Rabaul.
Service record
1890-12-18 born
1912-7-17 Midshipman Graduates from Naval Academy, standing 23rd in a class of 144. Assigned to CL Adzuma

1913-5-1 CL Yakumo


1913-12-1 Ensign
1915-12-13 Lieutenant junior grade Torpedo School Basic Course

1916-6-1 Gunnery School Basic Course

1916-12-1 DD Hatsuyuki


1918-5-1 DD Kiri


1918-12-1 Lieutenant Torpedo School Advanced Course
1919-12-1 DD Sakura


1921-2-10 DD Susuki


1921-11-10 CL Asama


1922-4-15 DD Numakaze


1923-6-30 DD Tanikaze


1923-11-10 CL Oi


1924-12-1 Torpedo School Expert Course
1925-12-1 Lieutenant commander Instructor, Torpedo School
1929-11-30 Staff, Bureau of Supplies, Yokosuka

1931-5-1 Staff, Chinkai Guard District

1931-12-1 Commander
1933-10-20 Commander, PG Ataka


1935-10-15 Executive officer, BB Nagato


1936-1-16 2 Naval District

1936-4-1 Executive officer, CA Atago


1936-11-2 Commander, AO Sata


1936-12-1 Captain
1937-12-1 Commander, Interim Defense Force
1938-12-15 Commander, AGP Nihonkai Maru
1939-4-1 Commander, 4 Defense Force
1939-11-15 Commander, Saiki Defense Force
1940-11-15 Commander, 1 Defense Force
1941-9-15 3 Naval District

1941-11-20 Commander, Combined Sasebo SNLF

1942-3-10 Commander, 23 Base Force

1942-5-1 Rear admiral
1942-12-21 Commander, Yokosuka Guard Force

1943-8-24 Staff, 8 Fleet

1943-9-9 Commander, 7 Auxiliary Base Force

1943-10-25 Staff, 8 Fleet
1943-11-15 1 Naval District

1944-2-15 Commander, Chichi-jima Base Force

1945-5-1 Vice admiral
1946-10-4 Retires
1949-4-22 Executed for war crimes





Osugi Morikazu (1892-1948)
Osugi commanded Seito Base Force when war broke out in the Pacific. He later commanded Destroyer Squadron 10.
Service record
1892-3-11 born
1913-12-19 Midshipman Graduates from Naval Academy, standing 40th in a class of 118. Assigned to CL Adzuma

1914-12-1 Ensign CL Yakumo


1915-12-13 BB Haruna


1916-12-1 Lieutenant junior grade
1919-12-1 Lieutenant
DD Shimakaze


1922-12-28 Destroyer Division 1
1923-11-1 Instructor, Naval Academy
1925-12-1 Lieutenant commander Naval College A-Course
1927-12-1 CL Yakumo


1928-2-1 1 Naval District

1931-10-31 Staff, Battleship Division 3
1931-12-1 Commander
1932-11-1 Staff, 2 Naval District

1935-7-1 Staff, 5 Fleet
1936-12-1 Captain
1937-4-1 Commander, AO Ondo


1937-12-1 Commander, Tokyo Communications Unit
1938-1-1 Chief, S-Administration, Bureau of Supply, Yokosuka

1938-10-22 Chief of staff, 4 Naval District

1939-11-15 Commander, CA Maya


1941-4-15 Commander, BB Kongo

1941-8-20 Commander, Seito Base Force

1942-4-10 Chief Instructor, Naval Academy
1942-5-1 Rear admiral
1943-6-21 Commander, Destroyer Squadron 10
1943-12-3 Staff, Combined Fleet
1944-1-10 Staff, 2 Southern Expeditionary Fleet
1944-1-26 Commander, 23 Base Force

1945-5-1 Vice admiral
1946-12-10 Retires
1948-8-28 Executed for war crimes




Saito Masatoshi (1885-1953)
Saito Masatoshi (Saito Yaheita) commanded 25 Army from from July 1942. He was replaced in March or April 1943 and posted to Java for garrison duty. On 27 March 1944 he took command of all prisoner of war camps in Malaya.
When Saito formally surrendered his sword to Mountbatten following the general surrender, Mountbatten is said to have immediately handed the sword to a female aid with a comment that he had not time for such trash. This was a calculated insult in response to Saito's mistreatment of Allied prisoners of war. Saito was then held for trial in Changi Jail, and subsequently convicted and hanged.
Service record
1885 Born
1929 Colonel Instructor, War College
1930 Chief, Control Section, Economic Mobilization Bureau, Ministry of War
1932 Staff, Kwantung Army

1933 Commander, 6 Regiment
1935 Major general Commander, 28 Brigade
1937 1 Division
1937 Commander, 4 Independent Garrison Unit
1938 Lieutenant general Commander, 101 Division, China

1940 General Staff
1940 Head, Ordnance Headquarters
1942-7 Commander, 25 Army, Malaya
1943-4 General Staff
1944-3-27 Commander, POW camps, Malaya
1953 Condemned to death for war crimes



Tanabe Moritake (1889-1949)
Tanabe was a lieutenant general and vice chief of the Army General Staff when war broke out. He favored a strategy of luring the Allies into campaigns in areas away from their bases and opposed attacks on Hawaii and Australia. Given the superiority of Allied logistics, this strategy must be regarded as badly misreading relative strengths and weaknesses. On the other hand, he was instrumental in helping put an end to the disastrous attrition at Guadalcanal.
Tanabe was given command of 25 Army under 7 Area Army at Fort de Kock, Sumatra, by April 1943. He remained at this post for the remainder of the war.
Service record
1889 Born
1933 Instructor, Toyama Army Infantry School

1934 Staff, Ministry of War
1936 Colonel Commander, 34 Regiment
1937 Director, Toyama Army Infantry School
1937 Chief of staff, 10 Army
1938 Commandant, Tank School

1939 Commander, 41 Division
1941 Chief of staff, North China Area Army

1941 Lieutenant General Vice Chief, General Staff
1942 General Staff
1943 Commander, 25 Army
1945 Arrested as war criminal
1949 Executed


Uchida Ginnosuke (1893-1951)
Uchida may have commanded 118 Division in north China in September 1944. He was a lieutenant general and commander of 116 Division under 20 Army during the western Hunan campaign of April-June 1945.
Service record
1893 Born
1941 Major general Commander, 5 Independent Mixed Brigade

1944 Lieutenant general Commander, 118 Division
1951 Executed for war crimes




Yahagi Nakao (1895-1949)
Yahagi commanded 25 Independent Mixed Brigade in 1943-1944.
Service record
1895 Born
1937 Colonel North China Area Army

1938 Head, Ohara Special Agency, China

1939 Central China Expeditionary Army
1939 Headquarters, China Expeditionary Army

1942 Chief, Army Intelligence Branch, Imperial General Headquarters

1943 Major general Commander, 25 Independent Garrison Unit
1943 Commander, 25 Independent Mixed Brigade

1944-10-14 Chief of staff, 25 Army, Sumatra

1949 Hanged for war crimes
Last edited by ansata1976 on 20 Jul 2009 16:15, edited 1 time in total.

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Peter H
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by Peter H » 14 Jul 2009 23:48

Hi

Good topic but you need to reference your source material.A lot of it appears to be a direct copy from Wikipedia.In that case the quote function should be used with the link given.

ansata1976
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 15 Jul 2009 21:32

Philippine Trials

Record Number:
Location of Trial: Manila, Philippine Islands
Trial Date (S) February 10, 1947
No of Defendants: 2
Defendant: Yasuo Hirose, Masaru Takata
President: Colonel Harry Keeley
Members: Lieutenant Colonel Santiago Guevara, Major Archie Griggs, Major Arnold Hoebeke
Prosecution Attorney(s) Mr. Raymond Sweeney, Major Samuel Rowe
Defense Attorney(s) Mr. Otto Schultz, Mr. William Peterson, Mr. Reuben Bonda
Charge 1: In that Hiroshi and Takata, at or near Sangi, Toledo, Cebu, Philippine Islands, on or about May 4, 1944, did willfully, wrongfully, and unlawfully, kill Tomas Tabriga, a non-combatant Filipino civilian by bayoneting him, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 2 In that Hiroshi, in or about October or November 1944, did wrongfully, and unlawfully kill Juan Gutang, a non-combatant Filipino civilian by bayoneting him, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 3: In that Hiroshi, near Sangi, Town of Toledo, Cebu, Philippine Islands, on or about March 31st, or April 1944, while a state of war existed between the United States of America, did wrongfully and unlawfully rape Constancia Pagdalian, an unarmed noncombatant female Filipino civilian, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Verdict 1: Takata: guilty, Hirose: guilty
Verdict 2: Hirose: guilty
Verdict 3: Hirose: guilty
Sentence: Takata: Imprisonment for twenty years
Hirose: death by hanging


Philippine Trials
Record Number:
Location of Trial: Manila, Philippine Islands
Trial Date (S) August 22, 1946
No of Defendants: 3
Defendant: Seiichi Onishi, Hajime Kawahara, Tsugiharu Ogata
President: Colonel Richard C Stickney
Members: Lieutenant Colonel John Madden, Captain Anderson Neeley, Captain Edward Clausen
Prosecution Attorney(s) 2nd Lieutenant James Miner
Defense Attorney(s) Mr. Kenneth Simon
Charge 1: “In that Seeichi Onishi and other persons whose names are unknown, connected and acting with Japan, did, at or near Dumanjug, Cebu, Philippine Islands, on or about 7 April 1944, during a time of war between the USA, and Japan, willfully and unlawfully torture and murder Gavino Fuertes, also known as Budot, an unarmed, defenseless Filipino civilian by hanging and beating him, in violations of the laws of war.”
Charge 2 “In that Seiichi Onishi, Hajime Kawahara, Tsugiharu Ogata and other persons whose names are unknown, on or about October 1, 1944, willfully and unlawfully torture and wound Antonio Jaranilla and torture and murder Aniceto Araw, Felix Carreon, Juan Paulin, Cesar (LNU), Geronimo (LNU), Lafut (FNU), Santiago (FNU), all unarmed, defenseless Filipino civilians, by beating, burning, bayoneting and beheading them, in violation of the laws of war.”
Verdict 1: Onishi: Guilty; Kawahara: Not guilty; Ogata: Not guilty
Verdict 2: Onishi: Not guilty; Kawahara: Not guilty; Ogata: Not guilty
Sentence: Onishi: imprisonment for life; Kawahara: acquitted, Ogata: acquitted
Notes: -Regarding specification 1, Gavino Fuertes was a prisoner of Japanese who was tied to a tree in front of a Japanese garrison. Fuertes was beaten by passing Japanese soldiers and then killed. Prosecution argued that Colonel Onishi, who was claimed to be in the garrison and in full view of the tree, did nothing to stop the killing of Fuertes. Prosecution argues that as the superior officer present and with a room above the scene of torture, Onishi did not take any steps to stop the atrocity.
-Regarding specification 2, prosecution argued that Lieutenant Kawahara, the company commander, and Ogata, platoon leader, killed seven prisoners, and wounded an eighth, who later was called as a witness.
-Regarding specification 1, Defense argued that there is no evidence that Onishi issued an order to kill Gavino Fuertes and that prosecution only proved that Onishi may have been present during time of killing. Defense also attempted to expose contradictions in Prosecution witness testimony.
-Regarding specification 2, the Defense argues that the killings of 7 Filipinos were not acts of torture, but legal executions. 7 Filipinos were shown to be members of Teishin-Tai (Filipino fighting group who fought alongside Japanese) who attempted to defect from the Japanese army. As a unit of the Japanese army, 7 Filipinos were argued to have been legally executed by Japanese army and that this was not a war crime.



Philippine Trials
Record Number: 44-75
Location of Trial: Manila, Philippine Islands
Trial Date (S) March 25, 1947
No of Defendants: 2
Defendant: Toneo Shirakura, Osamu Watanabe
President: Colonel James Drake
Members: Lieutenant Colonel Jose Olivares, Major Livonia Fuller
Prosecution Attorney(s) Mr. Emory Smith
Defense Attorney(s) Mr. Dayton Harrington, Mr. Reuben Bonda
Charge 1: In that Shirakura and Watanbe, on or about 23 February 1944, at or near Iloilo, Iloilo Province, wrongfully and unlawfully kill Quintin Jagodilla, Teofilo Guardate, Ramon de Silos, Jose Juaneza, and Mariano Reyes, all unarmed noncombatant Filipino civilians, by striking them with swords, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Verdict 1: Shirakura: guilty, Watanabe: guilty
Sentence: Shirakua: Death by hanging, Watanbe: death by hanging


Philippine Trials
Record Number: 43-41-1
Location of Trial: Manila, Philippine Islands
Trial Date (S) February 26, 1947
No of Defendants: 10
Defendant: Yokio Ogo, Hidetada Tabata, Tokiyoshi Taga, Akeyoyshi Okumura, Hiroiki Eto, Tadashi Umemoto, Katsuyoshi Kishi, Tosheharu Hiroyama, Tedozi Nakamura, Keichiro Hamanaka
President: Colonel Paxton S. Cambell
Members: Colonel Paxton S. Cambell, Colonel Victor Z. Gomez (Law Member), Lieutenant Colonol Zim E. Lawhon, Lieutenant Colonel William G. Read, Lieutenant Colonel Oswald R. Hummel
Prosecution Attorney(s) Mr. Lincoln Lipscomb, Robert Neptune, Major Samuel Rowe
Defense Attorney(s) Mr. John Schauer, Mr Paul Parker, Mr. Reuben Bonda
Charge 1: In that Ogo, Taga, and Tabata, did in the month of October 1945, at or near Barrio Catagdaan, Sierra Bullones, Bohol Province, Philippine Islands, forcible and feloniously, against her will, have carnal knowledge of Benigna Carnetes a female Filipino civilian in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 2 In that Ogo, Okura, and Ito, and other persons whose names are unknown, did in the month of October 1945, at or near Barrio Catagdaan, Sierra Bullones, Bohol Province, Philippine Islands, wrongfully and unlawfully order and participate in the killing of Ellisar Calipis, and unarmed and noncombatant Filipino civilian, by stabbing him, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 3: In that Ogo and other persons whose names are unknown, did, in the month of June 1945, wrongfully and unlawfully permit and participate in the killing of Juan Gambuta, an unarmed and noncombatant Filipino civilian, by shooting him, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 4: In that Ogo and other persons whose names are unknown, did in the month of June, 1945, at or near Barrio Biyabas, Guindulman, Bohol Province Philippine Islands, wrongfully and unlawfully permit and participate in the killing of Teodora Sandigan, an unarmed and noncombatant Filipino civilian in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 5: In that Ogo and other persons whose names are unknown, at or near Barrio Basdeo, Guindulman, Buhol Province, Philippine Islands, wrongfully and unlawfully permit and participate in the killing of Felix Acaso, an unarmed and noncombatant Filipino civilian by shooting and bayoneting him, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 6: In that Ogo and other persons whose names are unknown, did in the month of August, 1945, at or near Sitio Cambagio, Barrio of Batuanan, Mabini, Bohol Province, Philippine Islands, wrongfully and unlawfully permit and participate in the killing of Cipriana Platino, an unarmed and noncombatant Filipino civilian, by beating and bayoneting her, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 7: In that Ogo, Umemoto, Taga, Kishi, Kikoyama, Nakamura, and Hamanaka, did in the month of September 1945, at or near Barrio Biyabas, Guindulman, Bohol Province, Philippine Islands, wrongfully and unlawfully permit and participate in the killing of Bernardino Lardaran and Juana Ladaran, both unarmed and noncombatant Filipino civilians, by shooting them, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Charge 8: In that Ogo, and other persons whose names are unknown, did in the month of December, 1945, at or near Barrio Catagdaan, Sierra Bullones, Bohol Province, Philippine Islands, wrongfully and unlawfully order and participate in the killing of Buhayon Uray and Victoriano Acena, both unarmed and noncombatant Filipino civilians, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Verdict 1: Ogo: Guilty; Taga: guilty
Verdict 2: Ogo: Guilty: Eto, guilty; Okumura: guilty
Verdict 3: Ogo: Guilty
Verdict 4: Ogo: Not guilty
Verdict 5: Ogo: Not guilty
Verdict 6: Ogo: Not guilty
Verdict 7: Ogo: Not guilty
Verdict 8: Ogo: Guilty
Sentence: Ogo: Death by Hanging, Eto: Life Imprisonment at Hard Labor, Taga: Imprisonment at Hard Labor for 50 years, Okumra: Imprisonment at Hard Labor for 30 years
Notes: Ogo was a corporal, but still charged with command responsibility. Regarding the first charge of rape, the rape victim mistakenly identified one of the translators as one of the attackers.



Philippine Trials
Record Number: 45-52
Location of Trial: Manila, Philippine Islands
Trial Date (S) October 7, 1946
No of Defendants: 1
Defendant: Masao Nanjo
President: Colonel Richard Stickney
Members: Lieutenant Colonel William MacKintosh
Major Robert Fritz
Major Milton Herr
Prosecution Attorney(s) Mr. Thomas D Aitken
Defense Attorney(s) Mr Robert Ward
Mr John Schauer
Charge 1: “…in the vicinity of Sitio Balogo, Barrior Boroboro, and hacienda Concepcion, all located within or near Baceled City, Province of Occidental Negros, Philippines, in or about the month of January 1944, unlawfully permit soldiers under his command to kill Terodoro Vera and to mistreat, torture, and kill Juan Villas, Filipino civilians in violation of the laws of war.”
Charge 2: “…at or near, Barrior Boroboro, Baceled City, Province of Occidental Negros, Philippines, in about the month of July 1944, unlawfully permit soldiers under his command to mistreat, torture, and kill Bartolene Toriano, a Filipina civilian, in violation of the laws of war.”
Charge 3: “…at or near, Barrior Boroboro, Baceled City, Province of Occidental Negros, Philippines, on or about December 21, 1944, unlawfully mistreat and torture Faustino Alindog, and Ricarido Alindog, Filipino civilians and did later, during the same day, at or near Matab-an Bacoled City, Province of Occidental Negros, unlawfully kill the said Faustino Alindog and Ricarido Alindog, in violation of the laws of war.”
Charge 4: “…at or near hacienda Carmen, Baceled City, Province of Occidental Negros, Philippines, on or about the 18th day of February, 1945, unlawfully kill Dionisio Antera and Francisco Villasor, Filipino civilians, in violation of the laws of war.” Emilio B Parreno, a Filipino civilian, in violation of the laws of war.”
Charge 5: “…did, at or near Cabanatuan River, in the vicinity of Baceled City, Province of Occidental Negros, Philippines, in or about the month of April, 1945, unlawfully mistreat and torture Tiburcio Jonota, Gil Tanique, Benito Mirivelles and Roman Dizon, Filipino civilians, and did at or near Barrio Magbuyo, Province of Occidental Negros, Philippines, kill the said Roman Dizon and Benito Mirivelles in violation of the laws of war.”
Charge 6: “…did at or near hacienda Francisco, in the vicinity of Bacolod City, Province of Occidental Negros, Phlippines, on or about the 5th day of December, 1944, unlawfully kill Dionisio Letosa, a Filipino civilian, in violation of the laws of war.”
Charge 7: “…at or near, , Baceled City, Province of Occidental Negros, Philippines, on or about December 8, 1944, unlawfully kill an undetermined number of Filipino civilians including Felix Amador, Felicito Alba, and Pablo Palomo, and did attempt to kill Marcos de Tomas, a Filipino civilian, in violation of the laws of war.”
Verdict: Specification 1: guilty, Specification 2: guilty, Specification 3: not guilty, Specification 4: not guilty, Specification 5: not guilty, Specification 6: guilty, Specification 7: guilty: of the charge, Guilty
Sentencing Death by Hanging
Command Responsibility?: Yes
Non-denial of Factual Allegations?: No
“Superior Orders” as a Defense?: No
Unfair Trial?: -
Notes: -Nanjo was 2nd Lieutenant
-Defense attempted to establish and alibi by claiming that Nanjo had been hospitalized to a gunshot wound during the time period in which he was alleged to have committed war crimes


Philippine Trials
Record Number:
Location of Trial: Manila, Philippine Islands
Trial Date (S) January 31, 1947
No of Defendants: 12
Defendant: Shumpei Hagino, Shinkichi Hosaka, Keiichi Kimura, Sakakatsu Kato, Ichiro Kobayashi, Rikizo Monma, Chiyokichi Fukuoka, Tetsusaburo Ito, Masaichi Susuki, Zenichiro Susuki, Zenichiro Mogami, Shigeru Takahashi
President: Colonel William R. Hamby
Members: Colonel Ricardo Poblete, Lieutenant Colonel Zim Lawhon, Lieutenant Colonel William G. Read
Prosecution Attorney(s) Earl W. Guthrie, 1st Lieutenant Agustin Banzon, Major Samuel Rowe
Defense Attorney(s) Henry Bernard, Cyril E Morrison, Reuben Bonda
Charge 1: “In that Shumpei Hagino, Shinkichi Hosaka, Keiichi Kimura, Sakakatsu Kato, Ichiro Kobayashi, Rikizo Monma, Chiyokichi Fukuoka, Nasaichi Susuki, Testsusaburo Ito and Zenichiro Magami, members of the Imperial Japanese Army, from about 16 February 1945 to about 18 February 1945 during a time of war between the United States of America and Japan, did at or near Taal, Batangas Province, Philippine Islands, unlawfully kill and permit members of the Imperial Japanese Army then under their control to kill Irinea Allanzor, Eusebin Navarro, and about two hundred forty-four (244) other Filipino noncombatant civilians in violation of the laws and customs of war.”
Charge 2 “In that Shumpei Hagino, Shigeru Takahashi, Masaichi Susuki, Chiyokichi Fukuoka, Zenichiro Mogami and Ichiro Kobayashi, on or about 28 February 1945, during a time of war between the United States of America and Japan, did at or near Bauan, Batangas Province, Philippine Islands, unlawfully kill and permit members of the Imperial Japanese Army under their control to kill Sixto Guerra, Juanito Lim, and about two hundred (200) other noncombatant Filipino civilians, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Verdict 1: Hagino: guilty, Mogami: guilty, Kobayashi: not guilty, Ito: guilty, Fukuoaka: guilty, Hosaka: guilty, Kato: not guilty, Kimura: not guilty, Monma: not guilty.
Verdict 2: Hagino: guilty, Mogami: guilty, Kobayashi: guilty, Fukuoka: not guilty
Sentence: Hagino: To be shot to death with musketry, Mogami:Life Imprisonment at Hard Labor
Kobayashi: Life Imprisonment at Hard Labor
Ito: Imprisonment at Hard Labor for Thirty Years
Fukuoka: Imprisonment at Hard Labor for Twenty-Five Years
Hosaka: Imprisonment at Hard Labor for Twenty Years



USA vs. Chinsaku Yuki
Philippines Trials, March 21, 1947
Pgs 1-1087
Document 41-167
Vols. 1-16

CONTENT DESCRIPTION PAGE
Charge 1: “In that Chinsaku Yuki, then a Sergeant-Major in the Imperial Japanese Army, did, at or near Lucena, Tayabas Province, Philippine Islands, on or about 23 May 1944, while a state of war existed, wrongfully and unlawfully torture Aguilar, Edilberto de Leon, and Amado de Royala, all unarmed, noncombatant Filipino civilians, in violation of the laws and customs of war.”
Charge 2 “In that Chinsaku Yuki, a member of the Imperial Japanese Army, did, at or near Lucena, Tayabas Province, Philippine Islands, on or about 20 December 1944, while a state of war existed, wrongfully and unlawfully permit members of the Imperial Japanese Army, then under his command, to torture Catalina Evangelista, an unarmed, noncombatant Filipina, in violation of the laws and customs of war.”
Charge 3 “In that Chinsaku Yuki, a member of the Imperial Japanese Army, did, at or near Lucene, Tayabas Province, Philippine Islands, on or about 20 December 1944, while a state of war existed, wrongfully and unlawfully permit of the Imperial Japanese Army, then under his command, to torture Catalina Evangelista, an unarmed, noncombatant Filipina, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Mrs. De Royala-witness -2 sons were tortured by Kempei Tai
-Describes seeing Yuki 15
Cross-Examination -Son Amado was a guerrila 27
Exam By Commission 34
Amado De Royla-witness -Taken by Japanese with his brother Benjamin and friends and beaten
-Lined up against a wall
-Others disappeared 37
Cross-Examination Witness was a 1st Lieutenant in the guerrilla group, Hunters ROTC 44
Exam by Commission 49
Ramon Cavarro-witness -practicing attorney
-was arrested by Yuki
-Witness withdrawn as to not prejudice the court
53
Panfila Babista - witness -Summoned to room with Yuki, Captain Awazu and others
-Buried body of Babista who was said by Japanese to have jumped out of window
-Body had signs of torture
-Burn marks all over the body 57
Ramon Cavarro recalled-witness -Practicing attorney
-Was tortured by Yuki
-Says Catalina Evangelista was in the house at the same time that he was
82
Pedro del Mundo- witness Janitor
-Was tortured by Yuki who used water torture
-Recognizes Yuki’s voice and Catalina’s voice who was in a cell directly above him 101
Exam by Commission -Cells had wooden walling
-Witness only heard Yuki and Catalina’s voice 111
Galo Martinez – witness Student
-Arrested, taken to Kempei Tai headquarters
-Hears voice of woman and Yuki
-Witness was a guerrilla
-Describes torture of Doctor Mayo 118
Defense Opening Statement -States it will prove defendant was absent from headquarters, December 24-25
-States that it will prove Evangelista committed suicide 137
Heiji Kita -witness Japanese Prisoner of War
-1st Lieutenant
-States that he saw Yuki at Manila on December 24th 139
Toyoji Shinohara-witness -States that on December 20, Yuki came to Manila to deliver report that Americans landed at Nasengbu
145
Yuki-Witness Accused brought to stand
-Master Sergeant, Kempei Tai
-In charge of Guerilla Information and used Filipino Informants and Japanese residents
-States he arrested people, but denies use of torture
-States he was at Manila during time of Evangelista’s death
-States he didn’t use the water cure or knows how it is administered 153
Moises Disanta-witness Eyewitness
Imprisoned by Japanese
-Cellmate was Gregorio Sena who said that he had been tortured by Japanese with the name of Yuki
-Was a Guerilla
-Was tortured
-While hanging – Sees girls being beaten by Yuki when door opens –
-Girl slaps Yuki
-Yuki beats girls and throws her out the window 222
Defense Closing Argument -States that torture victims were guerillas
-States Yuki was sixth in rank and not commanding officer at Kempei Tai headquarters
-Defense of Superior Orders
-Girl committed suicide 227
Prosecution Closing Argument -Recaps witness testimony citing Yuki
-States that Guerillas are not allowed to be tortured despite the fact that they are unlawful combatants
237
Verdict 1 Guilty

Verdict 2 Guilty
Verdict 3 Guilty


Source:
http://conium.org/~warcrime/Japan/Phili ... Onishi.htm
http://conium.org/~warcrime/Japan/Phili ... rakura.htm
http://conium.org/~warcrime/Japan/Phili ... es_Ogo.htm
http://conium.org/~warcrime/Japan/Phili ... _Nanjo.htm
http://conium.org/~warcrime/Japan/Phili ... Hagino.htm
http://ist-socrates.berkeley.edu/~warcr ... etails.htm
http://ist-socrates.berkeley.edu/~warcr ... Hirose.htm
Last edited by ansata1976 on 17 Jul 2009 17:14, edited 1 time in total.

David Thompson
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by David Thompson » 15 Jul 2009 22:00

Thanks for those sources, ansata1976.

ansata1976
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 16 Jul 2009 10:56

I need more information,names and dates about defendants of warcrime trials in Indochina,China,Philippines and Malaysia.

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Peter H
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by Peter H » 16 Jul 2009 11:57

Try these.

US National Archives
http://www.archives.gov/iwg/japanese-war-crimes/

National Archives of Australia:
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/record ... index.aspx

The ANA is search by name. e.g to find Hiromura Kakurai

Click on "Search Now-as a guest"

In "General Search" enter HIROMURA Kakurai as "Keywords(Name)"- click Search

Search Results of 4-hit "Display"

Displays 4 results.

The top result has "View Digital Copy" on far right.Click this.

This gives you the trial transcripts,documents.Some run to hundreds of pages.

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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 17 Jul 2009 17:11

But then i need the names of men sentenced in Rangoon,Manila,Kuala Lumpur and Indochina.

ansata1976
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 20 Jul 2009 16:37

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Sueo Matoba

Major Sueo Matoba was convicted at a Guam trial in 1946 of feeding captured American Airmen to his officers mess.

Japanese officer, Major Sueo Matoba, decided to include American flesh in a sake-fuelled feast he laid on for officers including the commander-in-chief on the island, Gen Yoshio Tachibana. Both men were later tried and executed for war crimes.

The next day a Japanese officer, Major Sueo Matoba, decided to include American flesh in a sake-fuelled feast he laid on for officers including the commander-in-chief on the island, Gen Yoshio Tachibana. Both men were later tried and executed for war crimes.
A Japanese medical orderly who helped the surgeon prepare the ingredients said: "Dr Teraki cut open the chest and took out the liver. I removed a piece of flesh from the flyer's thigh, weighing about six pounds and measuring four inches wide, about a foot long."
Another crewman, Floyd Hall, met a similar fate. Adml Kinizo Mori, the senior naval officer on Chichi Jima, told the court that Major Matoba brought "a delicacy" to a party at his quarters - a specially prepared dish of Floyd Hall's liver.
According to Adml Mori, Matoba told him: "I had it pierced with bamboo sticks and cooked with soy sauce and vegetables." They ate it in "very small pieces", believing it "good medicine for the stomach", the admiral recalled.
A third victim of cannibalism, Jimmy Dye, had been put to work as a translator when, several weeks later, Capt Shizuo Yoshii - who was later tried and executed - called for his liver to be served at a party for fellow officers. Parts of a fourth airman, Warren Earl Vaughn, were also eaten and the remaining four were executed, one by being clubbed to death.
On December 17, 1945 Col. Rixey ordered Major Robert D. Shaffer, USMC to start rounding up these criminals. After their arrest they were taken to Guam to await trial.
In September 1946, Gen. Tachibana, Capt. Yoshio, Col. Ito, Maj. Matoba and Capt. Nakajima were all found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging.
Adm. Mori and Capt. Sato were given life in prison.






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Balikpapan, Borneo. 1945-11-08. Lieutenant Madono Atsushi, a suspected Japanese war criminal, awaits interrogation at Headquarters 7th Division.
He is accused of participating of his own accord in the execution of natives at Ioa Koeloe on 1945-07-30, and of beheading two men and driving his sword into a woman.
He is also accused of executing four victims with his sword during 1945-06.



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One of the main characters in A River Kwai Story is a Korean gonzoku or civilian contractor named Hong Ki-song, also known by his Japanese name Toyoyama Kisei, who was one of the most hated guards on the Burma Thailand Railway, and was notorious for beating prisoners of war with the shaft of a golf club. Toyoyama, who volunteered for the duty, was sentenced to death by a British military court in Singapore. That sentence was later commuted to life imprisonment. This mug shot was taken by the U.S. army in Sugamo Prison in Tokyo.

ansata1976
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 20 Jul 2009 17:04

Kōki Hirota (Hirota Kōki, 14 February 1878 – 23 December 1948) was a Japanese diplomat, politician and the 32nd Prime Minister of Japan from March 9, 1936 to February 2, 1937.

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Hirota was born in what is now part of Chūō-ku, Fukuoka city, Fukuoka Prefecture. His father was a stone mason, and he was adopted into the Hirota family. He graduated with law degree from Tokyo Imperial University. One of his classmates was post-war Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida.
In 1936, with the radical factions within the Japanese military discredited following the February 26 Incident, Hirota was selected to replace Admiral Okada Keisuke as Prime Minister of Japan.
However, Hirota placated the military by reinstating the system by which only active duty Army or Navy officers could serve in the post of War Minister or Navy Minister – a system which the military had abused in the past to bring down civilian governments.
In terms of foreign policy, the Anti-Comintern Pact with Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy was signed under his cabinet. This treaty was the predecessor to the Tripartite Pact of 1940.
However, Hirota's term lasted for slightly less than a year. After the disagreement with Hisaichi Terauchi who was serving as the War Minister, over the speech by Kunimatsu Hamada, he resigned from his position. Kazushige Ugaki was appointed, but unable to form the government due to Army's opposition. In February 1937, Senjūrō Hayashi was appointed to replace him. Following Japan's surrender, Hirota was arrested as a Class A war criminal and was brought before the International Military Tribunal for the Far East. He offered no defense and was found guilty of the following charges:
• count 1 (waging wars of aggression, and war or wars in violation of international law)
• count 27 (waging unprovoked war against the Republic of China)
• count 55 (disregard for duty to prevent breaches of the laws of war)
He was sentenced to hang, and was executed at Sugamo Prison. The severity of his sentence remains controversial, as Hirota was the only civilian executed as a result of the Tokyo trials. It is often stated that the main factor in his death sentence was the fact that he was party to information about what is now known as the Nanjing Massacre, about which he is alleged to have telegraphed to the Japanese embassy in Washington D.C.. As Foreign Minister, Hirota received regular reports from the War Ministry about the military's atrocities, but lacked any authority over the offending military units themselves. Nonetheless, the tribunal condemned Hirota's failure to insist that the Japanese Cabinet act to put an end to the atrocities. Other possible factors in Hirota's sentence included his signing of the Tripartite Alliance, and the antipathy of China's Kuomintang government towards the Hirota Sangensoku, which they viewed as providing justification for Japan's aggression leading to Second Sino-Japanese War (which began during Hirota's second term as Foreign Minister).

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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 20 Jul 2009 23:01

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An unidentified Japanese prisoner ascends the gallows on Guam.

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Squadron Leader Pitts guards the handcuffed war criminals
From the left - Lt. Soni ('Sonny Boy'), Interpreter Cassiama, Sgt. Major 'Gunso' Mori

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On March 10, 1947, Tani Masuo, who directed the Nanjing Massacre, was escorted to execution grounds after judgment by the Nanjing military court.

ansata1976
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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 20 Jul 2009 23:16

Additionally, Surgeon Captain Hiroshi Iwanami was found guilty of murdering ten American POWs. Rear Admiral Shimpei Asano and Surgeon Commander Chisato Ueno were found guilty of torturing and murdering four American POWs at Chuuk and Kwajalein. Evidence was found that Iwanami, Asano, and Ueno had allowed or conducted medical experimentation and mutilation of the bodies of the POWs.

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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by Ossian » 21 Jul 2009 15:10

ansata1976 wrote:Image
An unidentified Japanese prisoner ascends the gallows on Guam.
The ''unidentified soldier'' in this picture appears to be Lieutenant colonel Kikuji Ito of the Imperial Japanese Army, hanged on 19 June, 1947 at Guam after trial before a Military Commission conducted by the United States Navy. A copy of the trial transcript in his case and a detailed report of his execution (pages 157-250) may be found on a paid site known as footnote. First Lieutenant Charles C. Rexroad of the United States Army was the executioner.

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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by ansata1976 » 22 Jul 2009 15:19

January 5 1946
• In Manila, Phillipines, a US Military Commissions court convicts Japanese Lieutenant Colonel Seiichi Ohta of war crimes, sentencing him to death by hanging. Ohta was commander of the Japanese secret police in Manila during the occupation, and was known as "the bloody butcher of Fort Santiago".

January 9 1946
• In Manila, Phillippines, a US military commission sentences Takuma Higashije and Soichi Kobayashi to hanging for the murder of civilians and directing torture.
• In Borneo, the Labuan Military Court convicts and sentenced to hanging Japanese Captain Takakumo for the deaths of 824 prisoners. His adjutant Captain Watanabe is sentenced to be shot.
January 14 1946
• In Melbourne, Australia, a war crimes court sentences Japanese Admiral Hamanaka to death for the murder of an Australian prisoner in June 1945.
January 15 1946
• In Melbourne, Australia, a court sentences Japanese Captain Kato to death by shooting for the execution of an Australian prisoner in Netherlands New Guinea.
January 25 1946
• In Yokohama, Japan, a US military commission sentences to death Japanese Captain Kaichi Hirate for atrocities against Allied prisoners.
February 23 1946
• In Manila, Philippines, Japanese Lieutenant General Tomoyuki Yamashita is hanged as a war criminal. Also, Lieutenant Colonel Seichi Ohta, former head of Japanese Thought Police in Philippines, and Takuma Higashigi, Japanese civilian interpreter. All were convicted of torture and murder of Filipino civilians.
February 28 1946
• US Military Trial Commission in Shanghai, China, sentences five former Japanese soldiers to be hanged for strangulation and cremation of three American B-29 airmen at Hankow in December 1944.




March 22 1946

In Manila, Philippines, former Japanese soldier Soichi Kobayashi is hanged as war criminal or the murder of Filipino civilians.

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Re: Japanese Trials

Post by David Thompson » 22 Jul 2009 16:23

ansata1976 -- If you are taking items from a website and posting them here, please provide the link:
http://www.islandnet.com/~kpolsson/ww2hist/ww21946.htm

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