Barkmann's Corner

Discussions on WW2 in Western Europe & the Atlantic.
Cannonade
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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Cannonade » 09 Feb 2010 02:30

RichTO90 wrote: Gack! I think the cold is turning my brain to silly putty...

It was the 4th Cav Squadron at La Lorey not the 38th, nor was the 38th part of the 4th Cav Group. They have a number of mongraphs at MCOE, but all from earlier periods. The account I read of the La Lorey and Marigny action on 27 July is in the 1st Division monograph.

I'm afraid I don't have the 1st Division AAR for the period and little intention of treking north through the snowy wasteland anytime soon to pick it up. :D But I will eventually since I will need it for other work and also because rereading the monograph makes me fairly certain the action of the 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry is most probably "Barkmann's Corner", but it was on the 28th, not the 27th, it was much further west near Cambernon (basically astride the D141 AFAICT) and nowhere near the N172, and he almost certainly wasn't alone. Aside from that it's exactly as he described it. :lol:

Okay, a little more digging into the 745th AAR for the 27th and 28th. Basically on the 27th Company B supported the 18th Infantry in clearing Marigny from 0700-0800 with one man LWIA and no vehicle losses. The Bn HQ and A and B Company remained with the 16th Infantry, and C Company with the 26th Infantry. At 1707 A Company with the I Company, 16th Infantry riding, left an assembly area off the D29 1,600 meters north of Marigny and headed for Coutances, skirting west of Marigny and being delayed by "many halts due to pockets of enemy resistance and heavy traffic" finally going into an assembly area between Camprond and Belval-Gare at 0030 28 July. At 0815 the 3rd Bn, 16th Infantry with the Bn HQ and A Company continued southwest towards Coutances. Just west of Cambernon they encountered elements of "2nd Panzer Division" (they don't say, but probably 2. SS-Panzerdivision) with 3 Mk 5 and 1 Mk 4 SP (possibly from 17. SS-Panzergrenadierdivision?). They were heavily engaged there until 1809 when they pulled back to let artillery and air pound them. The battalion losses were 4 M4 and 2 M5 (from D Company with the 1st Bn, 16th Infantry about a km south) knocked out, 1 KIA, 5 WIA, along with 2 M10 of the attached 634th TD Bn and 3 KIA, 2 WIA, and 1 MIA. They reported destroying two of the Panthers. Total 1st Division casualties for 27 July were reported as 13 KIA, 40 WIA, and 4 MIA and on 28 July they were 16 KIA, 186 WIA, and 6 MIA, with all three regiments engaged to one degree or another.

That also could be "Barkmann's Corner". In which case he knocked out four M4. Assuming the other two Panthers and StuG-IV weren't really there or didn't hit anything.

Rich,

Not to worry about the brain putty problem. I am pretty sure I’ve cornered the market on that stuff, and there should be very little left floating around to trouble you. :)

As previously mentioned, Blumenson says in Breakout and Pursuit the 16th Infantry ran into heavy resistance, lost 15 tanks, 7 of which were mediums, and made no further advance during the afternoon. (Blumenson cites the 16th Infantry S-3 Journal as his source for this action.) This is supported by the 3rd Armored Division’s G-3 supplement, which states CCB was ordered by General Huebner to go to the aid of the 16th Infantry which was facing a strong enemy near Comprond. There is an accompanying map which shows the route of CCB, and its return to the area of Comprond. And Comprond is just a stone's throw from Le Lorey. (OK not a stone's throw, but 1 mile perhaps?)

Here is what appears to be going on. The 3d battalion of the 16th which you mentioned met strong resistance just west of Cambernon, was apparently advancing in close company with CCB to reinforce its armored infantry. The remaining two battalions were following along behind when they ran into a hastily formed German defense near Camprond.

According to Blumenson, the 26th Infantry was not committed until the morning of 28 July. Its initial objective, Cambernon, had already been taken by CCB, so the regiment was ordered to cover the 1st Infantry Division’s left flank in a mopping up operation. From this it appears only the 16th and 18th Infantry were in action on 27 July. The higher casualties you found on the 28th support the idea that someone got into a serious fight.

Somewhere in all is the 38th Cavalry Squadron since it was attached to the 1st Infantry Division from 12 June to 31 July 1944.

To further complicate the OOB, the 113th Cavalry Group was attached to the 3d Armored Division from 8 July - 10 August 1944. From this we might infer that CCB had a cavalry squadron attached from the 113th during the time in question.
Postscript: The ETO OOB gives the above information. Stanton says the 113th was with the 35th Infantry Division, and then with the 2nd AD. The ETO OOB says the 113th left the 35th ID prior to 8 July. Who do we believe?

Jim

RichTO90
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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by RichTO90 » 09 Feb 2010 05:27

Cannonade wrote:As previously mentioned, Blumenson says in Breakout and Pursuit the 16th Infantry ran into heavy resistance, lost 15 tanks, 7 of which were mediums, and made no further advance during the afternoon. (Blumenson cites the 16th Infantry S-3 Journal as his source for this action.)
That is all well and good, except that the 16th Infantry did not have tanks, HQ, the AG Platoon, and Company A and D, 745th Tank Battalion had the tanks and they were attached to the 16th Infantry. It may seem a minor point, but the 16th Infantry S-3 could only report what the 745th BN CO told him they had lost...anthing else would be speculation. And we know what the 745th lost that day, because they reported the loss.
This is supported by the 3rd Armored Division’s G-3 supplement, which states CCB was ordered by General Huebner to go to the aid of the 16th Infantry which was facing a strong enemy near Comprond. There is an accompanying map which shows the route of CCB, and its return to the area of Comprond. And Comprond is just a stone's throw from Le Lorey. (OK not a stone's throw, but 1 mile perhaps?)
I wish I could see the map you are looking at since I do not have it. But I do have the locations, movements, and timing for the 745th BN and the 3rd Bn, 16th Infantry, along with that - inferred - for the 3rd Bn, 16th Infantry and D Company, 745th. They moved from the vicinity of Comprond-Belval-Gare towards Cambernon so the could continue their advance to Monthuchon, apparently with their left flank on the N172. CCB, 3rd AD as you mentioned had advanced towards Coutances, then moved back to support the two battalions of the 16th and the 745th, following the N172 back and then turning north to come up on the left of the two battalions. In the meantime, D Company, 745th, which had been on the left lost two tanks to antitank fire and then shifted to the right, joining the Bn HQ and A Company. Meanwhile, the 18th Infantry was at Marigny and south, the 4th Cav tied in to the west, extending some 2,000 yards to Le Lorey where they engaged in the skirmish I have previoulsy alluded to on the 27th, while the 26th Infantry and C Company were in reserve north of Marigny.

For an account of these events see https://www.benning.army.mil/monographs ... %20LTC.pdf especially pages 20-24. On page 24 is their take on the casualties of the 16th CT - 7 tanks, 1 tank destroyer, and 125 men. That actually is a close match for the 745th Tank account, four medium tanks, two light tanks, and two M10 TD...obviously someone scrambled one of the M10 for being an M4. Then they mention the casualties specifically of the 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry, 5 mediums and one TD (again, someone scrambled the second M10 into an M4), which were already included in the previous total...and then add another 10 tanks, 2 tankdozers, and 11 casualties, which is yet another scrambling of the 745th's actual report (they reported that one of the four mediums they lost was Company A's tankdozer. So you see what was happening? Somehow the 16th Infantry S-3 was taking multiple reports of the same tank casualties and adding them together (more common an occurence than you might imagine). But the original source in this case is the 745th Tank Battalion AAR for the day, since they were their tanks and they were responsible for reporting them.
Here is what appears to be going on. The 3d battalion of the 16th which you mentioned met strong resistance just west of Cambernon, was apparently advancing in close company with CCB to reinforce its armored infantry. The remaining two battalions were following along behind when they ran into a hastily formed German defense near Camprond.
Um, no, only the 1st and 3rd Battalion of the 16th were engaged, the 2nd Battalion was in reserve. And they had started the day in an assembly area just south of Camprond, the Germans were further north and east, at La Lorey, and north and west, at Cambernon where the main engagement occurred.
According to Blumenson, the 26th Infantry was not committed until the morning of 28 July. Its initial objective, Cambernon, had already been taken by CCB, so the regiment was ordered to cover the 1st Infantry Division’s left flank in a mopping up operation. From this it appears only the 16th and 18th Infantry were in action on 27 July. The higher casualties you found on the 28th support the idea that someone got into a serious fight.
No need to speculate, the 1st Division account estimates the casualties in the fight at Cambernon were 125, plus the 12 losses to the 745th and 634th. Which for two infantry battalions and two tank companies were fairly heavy, but certainly not as bad as many engagements had been up to then.
Somewhere in all is the 38th Cavalry Squadron since it was attached to the 1st Infantry Division from 12 June to 31 July 1944.
The 38th Cav was probably actually detached by that point, they do not appear in the 1st Division plan. Mistakes in the ETOUSA "Divisions" are actually fairly common.
To further complicate the OOB, the 113th Cavalry Group was attached to the 3d Armored Division from 8 July - 10 August 1944. From this we might infer that CCB had a cavalry squadron attached from the 113th during the time in question.
No, since the 113th Cav was attached to the 3rd AD. It was CCB, 3rd AD that was attached to the 1st Division.
Postscript: The ETO OOB gives the above information. Stanton says the 113th was with the 35th Infantry Division, and then with the 2nd AD. The ETO OOB says the 113th left the 35th ID prior to 8 July. Who do we believe?
The 113th Cav was detached from the 35th Division on the 24th, reverted to corps control, and I believe was attached to the 3rd AD on the 28th (IOW it's a typo in "Divisions", which are also common). But I would have to check the original divisional AAR and Journal to make sure, all the postwar accounts include some scrambling as witness the casualty accounting by the 1st Division monograph and Stanton.

I hope that is clear since I am getting a bit punchy and will have to revert to other less interesting things for a day or so...

Cannonade
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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Cannonade » 09 Feb 2010 18:31

Rich,

Thank you for the detail reply to my various queries and suggestions. I fully understand the “punchy” feeling you have, and had a touch of it just reading everything you posted. I think you have a good idea in taking a couple of days off from the discussion. :idea: I will join you, after I upload the CCB, 3rd Armored Division map we've been talking about.

I had not previously realized that the report of losses from a subordinate unit trumped that of the higher headquarters to which it is attached. Now that you’ve explained it, it makes perfect sense, and I understand how the tank losses reported by the 16th Infantry S-3 were scrambled so badly. Thank you.

The 1st Infantry Division monograph you thoughtfully provide is appreciated, and I plan to read it during our brief hiatus from the discussion.

We do not know the OOB for CCB, 3rd Armored Division for the dates in question. At least I don’t. This gives me pause regarding the presence or absence of elements from the 38th Cavalry Squadron. I am certain that reading the 1st Infantry Division monograph will straighten this out for me.

In regard to the 113th Cavalry Group, it appears from you comments that none of its subordinate units were attached to CCB, 3rd AD.

I had heard the Stanton’s book contained errors, but not the OOB ETOUSA. Now that I know, I will be more careful using it as a reference.

I will attempt to scan the 3rd AD map that shows CCB returning to the vicinity of Comprond on 28 July, and will upload it here if I can figure out how to do it. That way we can both see it.

I want to let you know that I greatly appreciate your continuing patience (and diligence) in answering my questions. I am learning a great deal from you, particularly about quality research methods, and of course, the specific issue under discussion. :D

Cannonade

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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by RichTO90 » 09 Feb 2010 19:07

Cannonade wrote:We do not know the OOB for CCB, 3rd Armored Division for the dates in question. At least I don’t. This gives me pause regarding the presence or absence of elements from the 38th Cavalry Squadron. I am certain that reading the 1st Infantry Division monograph will straighten this out for me.
Actually, in this case the ETOUSA Theater Historian (i.e., S.L.A. Marshall and R. E. Dupuy) "Divisions" is useful, since the composition of CCB is given in the Detachments section of the 3rd AD entry as well as in the Attachments section of the 1st ID entry. Internal evidence suggests those lists were compiled directly from the monthly divisional AAR and Histories, so they are only as detailed as the division entry was (for example, sometimes an entry might only be "CCB" without a detail of its components). And the 38th Cav does not show up in either entry.

To make things even more complicated, one of the battalions of the 26th Infantry was attached to CCB, while the 3rd Battalions, 41st AIR was detached from its regiment and attached to 3rd AD reserve. :D

Cheers!
Richard Anderson
Cracking Hitler's Atlantic Wall: the 1st Assault Brigade Royal Engineers on D-Day
Stackpole Books, 2009.

Cannonade
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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Cannonade » 09 Feb 2010 21:52

RichTO90 wrote: Actually, in this case the ETOUSA Theater Historian (i.e., S.L.A. Marshall and R. E. Dupuy) "Divisions" is useful, since the composition of CCB is given in the Detachments section of the 3rd AD entry as well as in the Attachments section of the 1st ID entry. Internal evidence suggests those lists were compiled directly from the monthly divisional AAR and Histories, so they are only as detailed as the division entry was (for example, sometimes an entry might only be "CCB" without a detail of its components). And the 38th Cav does not show up in either entry.

To make things even more complicated, one of the battalions of the 26th Infantry was attached to CCB, while the 3rd Battalions, 41st AIR was detached from its regiment and attached to 3rd AD reserve. :D

Cheers!
Thought you said you were gong to take a break? It is addictive, isn't it. :lol:

Yet another book that I must add to my happy little collection. I will be on the lookout for a copy of Marshall and Dupuy's "Divisions." It seems a requirement if I want to get the straight stuff on the OOBs.

38th Cavalry - gone! But now, as you say, there was a battalion of the 26th Infantry attached to CCB. If it wasn't complicated it would not be as interesting. Don't you agree?

Spent nearly an hour (earlier) trying to figure out how to insert the CCB map image, with no luck. :? Will try again later after my scalp quits hurting from all the hair pulling.

Cannonade

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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Michael Kenny » 09 Feb 2010 22:11

When you click the 'reply' button there is an 'upload attachment' tab just underneath the text box.
As long as the attachment is a jpg. (NOT a bitmap!) and has been re-sized to 600 x 600 it is all automatic.

I was going to add maps because without them this is all double Dutch!

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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Cannonade » 10 Feb 2010 00:29

CCB Map 27-29 July 1944 copy.JPG
I hope this is legible. It shows the return from Cambernon to Camprond by CCB, 3rd AD on 28 July 1944. The map is from the G-3 Supplement. The accompanying text says CCB was ordered to return to help "1st ID in reducing an enemy strong point near Comprond."

Thanks to michael kenny for pointing out the upload attachment. Now maybe my hair will grow back in. :)

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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Cannonade » 10 Feb 2010 03:28

Here is a better image of the pertinent part of the above map.
Cambernon Comprond Marigny copy.JPG
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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Michael Kenny » 10 Feb 2010 04:52

Old posts I saved on my hard drive many years ago:


Barkmann´s corner is on the RN (rue nationale) 172 (named 174 on some maps) between St.Lo and Coutances. It is mostly mistaken as being the junction of RN172 and the small road leading to Le Lorey, but that is wrong. Herr Barkmann himself has pointed out a small track, almost unvisible today, as the road his Panther once came down.
Both Le Lorey and Neufbourg are just some houses and farms so you wouldnt find them on most maps.
You have to go from St.Lo towards Coutances, passing the junction to Marigny (app. 11km west from St.Lo). From that junction it is less than 4Km to "Barkmann´s Corner".

========================
Yes, he came down the little curvey road, and stopped standing on the RN172. Hearing the sound of engines and shooting he sent an army "Spiess" and another soldier who were following his tank trying to reach their lines again, too, east to see whats going on. While those were moving uphill he parked his Panther under a large oak-tree (no longer existing) on the other (south) side of the RN172. The painting suggest the northern side but this is incorrect. He mentioned to me "Of course we know the traffic-rules, so we parked on the right side!" A few minutes later they heard small-arms fire, and the 2 soldiers were running back, the "Spiess" wounded in the left arm. They screamed "The amis are coming!" Before they could reach his tank, the first Sherman appeard on top of the hill, and the 2 hide themself in the bushes seen on the painting, left of the road. The rest is history.

================================
Regarding the U.S. units potentially involved -- there are three divisional formations in the "operational" vicinity during the time frame of the battle. The 3rd Armored Division, 1st Infantry Division, and 4th Armored Division.

The latter Division (4th AD) is the least likely candidate. Elements were passing through the area from north to south. As I recall elements of CCB 3rd AD were bumping into elements of the 4th AD as far east as Cambernon -- this would likely be the left flank elements of 4th AD with the right flank closer to Coutances. But as I say, the axis of advance and eastern most extent of the 4th AD make it an unlikely candidate. However, I have not as yet obtained records from 4th AD. These would need to be cross checked in order to eliminate them completely from the equation.

3rd Armored Division is a more likely possibility. Obviously anyone even vaguely familiar with the history of the Cobra breakout and the vicinity of the Barkmann battlefield would have to rank 3rd AD as a possible candidate. However from my own review of 3rd AD records of CCA, and CCB, I think 3rd AD has only a marginal possibility of being the unit faced by Barkmann. To ensure all bases are covered, I need to review regimental AARs and perhaps battalion unit Journals. But as I say those familiar with this process understand it requires time and money to acquire these archival documents. In this case I am still awaiting regimental reports detailing this time frame.
=============
I think 1st Infantry Division has the greatest potential for being the unit faced by Barkmann. However, as I indicated previously, there are inconsistencies between 1st ID accounts of the breakout and the mostly likely source of the action and the “common story” associated with the Barkmann action
==================
I also found this info from the Das Reich Webpage
`"SS-Untersharführer Barkmann was left behind with his Panther on 27 July 1944 to guard two broken down vehicles north of Canisy. During the night of 28/29 July the vast backward moves of the Division completely cut him off from his own forces. He destroyed one tank and started his march towing the other. Partly crossing American lines and partly driving among them at night, he knocked out 14 enemy tanks and reached his own lines on 30 July 1944."
=======================
The Barkmann position being indicated as north of Canisy on the 27th certainly makes one wonder where the heck he was in time and space. If he was north of Canisy, and the famous battle actually took place on the 27th and not the 28th or 29th, this would put him along the axis of the 4th Infantry Division in their southward advance toward the railroad between Canisy and Carantilly.

But the Canisy position and the reference to Barkmann destroying a fuel truck would seem to put 3rd Armored Division back into a top runner up position for the unit most likely faced by Barkmann. 3rd Armors CCA had been split into three task forces, X, Y and Z. They had begun their advance starting from their assembly area around Saint Jean De Daye at about 0630 on Jul 27 (about 12Km north of St Lo). By about 1200 Task Force X of CCA had crossed onto the St Lo and Coutances highway (D972) about 3km west of St. Gilles. TF-X than started heading west along D972 toward Coutances. The other two task forces were stacked up behind TF-X. After a short stint on D972, TF-X than shifted their direction of march and headed south along secondary roads. By mid afternoon of the Jul 27th, CCA was northwest of Canisy and reaching toward Cerisy la Salle.

About the fuel truck: CCA of 3rd Armored Division had been tasked with bypassing points of resistance in what was intended to be a quick thrust to cut the highway south of Coutances. I think they were hauling supplies for several days worth of hard road marching, with the potential for being isolated or cutoff from their primary lines of communication at times. If conducted as planned or as hoped, the move would have succeeded in pocketing elements of six German divisions. The point being that I haven’t seen anything explicit about the presence of tanker trucks within the various task forces. But I think the nature of their objective might suggest fuel trucks would have been part of each of the CCA task forces. One would not think they would be so near the head of a column, however CCA had been advised by 4th ID that the area south of the bombing zone was "clear" of Germans.

Here is a question for your map reading skills – can you find the village of St. Benoit? It is indicated in TF-X’s Jul 27th report as being about the vicinity where TF-X exited D972 and started heading south.


===================
St. Benoît is on the D972 pretty much due south of Marigny town centre.
=======================
4th AD was advancing north to south along the Periers to Coutances Road (D971). 6th AD advanced north to south along Highway D-2 (Lessay to Coutances Highway).

1st Infantry Division (1st ID) got hung up in fighting in and around Marigny. The 18th Inf Regiment ended up clearing the town and the hill to the south of Marigny, while the 16th Infantry Regiment bypassed Marigny and advanced along D972 toward Coutances. There's a good account of 18th Infantry Regiments action in Marigny in "American Iliad" by Col. Mark Reardon
4th Infantry Division (4th ID) was part of the VII Corps initial attack on Jul 25. They pushed through right on the heels of the stauration bombing, and followed through toward the Rail Road running between Canisy and Carantilly.


=================================
CCA 3rd Armor Division (this is a smaller sub-unit of the 3rd Armor Division). CCA alone reports the loss of four tanks on Jul 27 in a single engagement. These were incurred during fighting just south of Marigny -- in the vicinity of St Benoit.

====================



Photos said to be Barkmann's location on the 972 and 1943 Map
Barkmannpositionpic2.jpg
Barkmannpositionpic.jpg
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John Hilly
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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by John Hilly » 10 Feb 2010 11:44

Stupid question:
What the hack are "CCA" and "CCB"?
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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Kingfish » 10 Feb 2010 12:16

John Hilly wrote:Stupid question:
What the hack are "CCA" and "CCB"?
Johnny the Simple
Combat Command A - CCA
Combat Command B - CCB
Combat Command R (for reserve) - CCR

American armored divisions generally divided themselves into mixed combat teams of armor, infantry, artillery and other divisional assets. These teams were given the title CCA, CCB and CCR.

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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Michael Kenny » 10 Feb 2010 12:19


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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Michael Kenny » 11 Feb 2010 01:55

The account in Panzers In Normandy, Then And Now:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Panzers-Normand ... 0900913290

Page 135

" by dawn on July 27 the Panther was finally back in running order.
As Barkmann set out to rejoin his Kompanie at its latest position, SS-Hauptscharführer Heinze and a motor
transport NCO, Corth, were clinging to the roof of the tank and taking a look at their new surroundings. Coming out of
the village of le Lorey, to the north of the St Lo-Coutances road, they pulled up alongside some infantry and rear area
troops who were running in the opposite direction. The answer to the men's shouts from on top of the tank came
from a Feldwebel: the Americans were on their way from St. Lo in fact, from where the regiment's tanks were sup-
posed to have been — and even äs the two NCOs looked hard at one another they could make out the sounds of
fighting. Heinze and Corth went forward on foot to investigate. Shots were heard and they came running back, one of
them having been hit in the shoulder and arm. The Americans were indeed on the main road from St Lo. Barkmann
decided to go äs far äs the crossroads.
At battle stations, the Panther moved along between a row of hedges which screened it on both sides, and stopped at
the crossroads under the thick spread of an oak tree. Armoured vehicles with white stars on them were coming along
the viewer. The Panther's turret shuddered. Flames leapt up from the leading American vehicle and the others
started to back away. The loader, in his shirtsleeves, was by now shoving round after round into the breech; the dull thud
of the gun and the dang of spent shell cases adding to the background noise of the Ventilator äs it drew out the cordite
fumes from inside the turret.
Further along, smoke from burning petrol tankers sullied the sky with black oily scrolls, and Jeeps and half-tracks lay
twisted and torn under the fire of the 7.5cm gun. Barkmann scanned the whole area around him continuously. To
the left of the road two Shermans were coming up. It took two shots to brew up the first, although the second managed
to get two hits on the Panther before it too fell victim. Beneath clouds of black smoke, the crossroads were no longer
visible yet still more vehicles kept coming.
It had to end somehow. Fighter-bombers were now cratering the ground all around. One bomb landed five metres
away and nearly turned the tank over,another rocked it on the left and damaged the running wheels, and
cannon shells bit into the armour plate äs the aircraft concentrated on this solitary tank that, singlehanded, was
blocking the road. Yet Barkmann hung on, continuing to fire at anything that came in sight.
Two Shermans opened fire from a flank, their shells scraping along the sides of the Panther's hüll. As the
as the turret turned relentlessly, the gun-layer responded instinctively. Both Shermans brewed up. Battered and
scarred, tank 424 was missing a track torn off by a direct hit, one of the hüll welds had been ripped open, and its
ammunition was practically exhausted. The driver, who had been wounded in the neck and was moaning with pain and
trembling uncontrollably, was struggling to open his hatch and get out — but it had jammed. Throwing aside his ear-
phones, he tried to work his levers to get the tank onto a slant. Barkmann called out to his gun-layer to try to calm him. A
shell clanged against the Panther's side. Back in his seat, the driver wrestled to get the tank away. With only one track
and a twisted drive sprocket, he somehow managed to get it to reverse —in the meantime the gun-layer had
managed to knock out another Sherman.
The two NCOs who had remained behind had totted up Barkmann's kills: the tanks alone came to nine. Crab-like,
his Panther crawled back to the little village of le Neufbourg; only then were they able to prise open the jammed
hatches with crowbars to release the driver and radio operator.
Meanwhile Barkmann — with the Shermans at his heels but still adding them to his tally, which had leapt to fifteen in just two days — had managed to reach Coutances. He got over the River Sienne by a bridge that he came upon by chance, and by the afternoon he was in sight of the sea at Granville although in an air attack the loader had
been injured and Barkmann wounded in the calf. Passing through one village that day, his tank and one that he afterwards
took in tow had accidentally knocked down two houses; though when the villagers rushed out, it was to fete them
with bouquets and bottles of wine äs liberators!
"

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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by John Hilly » 11 Feb 2010 10:56

Kingfish wrote:Combat Command A - CCA
Combat Command B - CCB
Combat Command R (for reserve) - CCR

American armored divisions generally divided themselves into mixed combat teams of armor, infantry, artillery and other divisional assets. These teams were given the title CCA, CCB and CCR.
Thanks!
In Finnish Army they used "TST.OS" - meaning Combat Groups usually based on reinforced IR's. While using bigger inregular formations the code was simply "Osasto, Os.". That is somewhat like Task force in the US Army.
Greets
Juha :D
"Die Blechtrommel trommelt noch!"

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Re: Barkmann's Corner

Post by Cannonade » 03 Mar 2010 01:59

I feel there are problems with some of the more recent posts.

A disjointed listing of unattributed posts serves no purpose, and does nothing to advance the discussion. It obscures the recent discussion for no apparent reason.

The same goes for posting maps to which someone has added the word's Barkmann's Corner, as if it were absolute fact.

It seems inappropriate, even foolish, to go to the effort of searching for sources from American records that might shed additional light on the issue at hand, while quoting Barkmann, as reported in a secondary source. Is there a primary source such as Barkmann's memoirs or documented interviews?

Cannonade

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