What exactly were Grousers in relation to Tank Tracks?

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Andy H
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What exactly were Grousers in relation to Tank Tracks?

Post by Andy H » 09 Mar 2003 23:33

As the question says, can anyone give me anymore info on Grousers.

Andy

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admfisher
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grousers

Post by admfisher » 09 Mar 2003 23:57

Track pads on a modern bulldozer would have normally a single grouser pad. That is the part of the track that provides traction. Or simpler way of looking at it is, the bar that crosses the pad and is raised.

When considering how many grousers you want, you look at the application of the machine and the terrain it is working on. The exacavators usually have triple grouser pads that give them less traction but more floatation.

On a WWII German tank the tracks were allmost totally single grouser pads.

It is interesting that tracks and the links are not paid more attention to, after selling Cat parts for a few years you see how far we have come in tracks and there related parts.

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Andy H
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Post by Andy H » 10 Mar 2003 00:07

Thanks Admfisher

I first thought they were something akin to snow chains that would give extra grip in difficult terrain, again thanks.

Andy

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admfisher
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No problem

Post by admfisher » 10 Mar 2003 23:13

No problem, the track pads now days are usually single, double or triple grouser. For soft ground you can get the LGP pad which is much wider.

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Aufklarung
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Post by Aufklarung » 11 Mar 2003 04:10

FYI
Diehl makes our modern track for our tanks. They're a German company. :)
Our tanks have two pads per shoe. Usually (peacetime/summer) we use only the slip-on rubber pads. This protects the roads to and fro the hangar lines. On Ex/Winter we put in place of the rubber a steel plate in the shape of a raised "X". This we here call a "Grouser". Every seventh or eighth shoe tho' not every shoe. This we do for added traction for the tank in mud, snow, and ice. So....
Andy H wrote:I first thought they were something akin to snow chains that would give extra grip in difficult terrain, again thanks.

you would be correct. :)
Regards
A :)

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admfisher
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grousers

Post by admfisher » 11 Mar 2003 15:22

The grouser on shermans were rubber or a steel cheveron (v-shape).

The Rubber pad was more for use in dry weather or when you were doing alot of travelling on roads. These rubber pads helped save the roads and they adding alittle to the comfort of the crew.

For traction in ice there were the add on ice teeth, or they welded a pattern onto the existing grouser, something like a series of x's across the grouser.

I am not totally clear hear but I do not believe any side in the war had tracks for just icy conditions, just add on teeth and such.

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