Albania 1939-1945

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DrG
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by DrG » 12 May 2012 13:23

Mailon, as usual in any internet forum, this thread is derailing into a useless quarrell. You are free to write and think whatever you wish. Of course you haven't the slightest idea of what is written by Ciano or Mussolini or which were the drivers of Italian foreign policy, if you like to think that the reconstruction of the Roman Empire was one of them, you can live with this idea.
About the other points you raised, the only one that I find agreeable is that about the dimensions of the Albanian Army in 1939: I felt too that it was an "on paper" figure.
Regarding Laçi, I reaffirm my opinion that he certainly can be labeled a terrorist, although I understand that Albanians may see him as an hero.
Anyway, you can stop about this futile propaganda of fierce Albanian people thinking that Italy was an invader: in front of a single Laçi there were tens of thousand of cheering people welcoming the King during his trip, and thousands of volunteers in the Armed forces, including Albanian Blackshirts. Only in 1943, when war was clearly lost for Italy, there were serious and large desertions from the Albanian armed forces, but usually deserters didn't oppose Italy actively, they just withdrew their support.
I understand that you had to rely on sources often unreliable: I even thought to buy Fischer's book (there is also an Italian edition of it), but once I read what you quoted in your paper I was apalled by his plain mistakes and changed my mind. Sadly, there are really few sources available about Albania in WW2, at least in English and Italian languages.

Guido

Delivery of the Flag to the Albanian Royal Guards of King Victor Emanuel III:
Image

Collection of Italian newsreels of 1939-1943 about Albania:

malioni91
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 31 Mar 2013 19:36

Photos taken from Epopeja e Luftes Nacional-Clirimtare e Popullit Shqiptar 1939-1944 [The Epopee of the National-Liberation War of the Albanian People 1939-1944]
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malioni91
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 31 Mar 2013 19:54

Same source as above
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 31 Mar 2013 20:04

Same source
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zastava128
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by zastava128 » 26 Apr 2013 19:17

First of all, I'd like to thank everyone for their contribution, information on Albania in WW2 is hard to come by!

Now I'd like to ask, does anyone know what sort of weaponry did the Albanian partisans use? What type of rifles, SMGs, etc. Did they have any armor or aircraft? Did they receive any aid from the British or Soviets?

malioni91
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 27 Apr 2013 14:28

zastava128 wrote:First of all, I'd like to thank everyone for their contribution, information on Albania in WW2 is hard to come by!

Now I'd like to ask, does anyone know what sort of weaponry did the Albanian partisans use? What type of rifles, SMGs, etc. Did they have any armor or aircraft? Did they receive any aid from the British or Soviets?
Hi,
The Albanian partisans used a variety of weapons, ranging from captured ones, to other weaponry supplied by the British. Before 1943, the partisans were armed mainly with Italian weapons (Carcano rifles, Beretta Model 38 SMG, Breda M30 and Breda M37) mostly captured or stolen from Italian military depots. After the armistice of 1943, the Partisans were equipped with heavier weaponry left behind by the Italian Army. Such weaponry consisted mostly of mountain guns, mortars and a few AA guns. By the end of 1943, the SOE established connections with the Partisan army, and British planes started air dropping considerable quantities of weapons, ammunition and other supplies. In terms of weapons, the British delivered Italian and German-made weapons which were captured in North Africa, as well as Sten guns, Bren guns, Colt M1911 pistols, and in the later stages they brought a few mountain guns, Boys rifles and mortars. The partisans did not field any armored vehicle or tank. I have read that during the final stages of the battle for Tirana, the partisans were able to repair a couple of armored cars left over by the Italians, and used them to support the attack on the German lines inside the city.

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zastava128
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by zastava128 » 28 Apr 2013 21:25

malioni91 wrote:
zastava128 wrote:First of all, I'd like to thank everyone for their contribution, information on Albania in WW2 is hard to come by!

Now I'd like to ask, does anyone know what sort of weaponry did the Albanian partisans use? What type of rifles, SMGs, etc. Did they have any armor or aircraft? Did they receive any aid from the British or Soviets?
Hi,
The Albanian partisans used a variety of weapons, ranging from captured ones, to other weaponry supplied by the British. Before 1943, the partisans were armed mainly with Italian weapons (Carcano rifles, Beretta Model 38 SMG, Breda M30 and Breda M37) mostly captured or stolen from Italian military depots. After the armistice of 1943, the Partisans were equipped with heavier weaponry left behind by the Italian Army. Such weaponry consisted mostly of mountain guns, mortars and a few AA guns. By the end of 1943, the SOE established connections with the Partisan army, and British planes started air dropping considerable quantities of weapons, ammunition and other supplies. In terms of weapons, the British delivered Italian and German-made weapons which were captured in North Africa, as well as Sten guns, Bren guns, Colt M1911 pistols, and in the later stages they brought a few mountain guns, Boys rifles and mortars. The partisans did not field any armored vehicle or tank. I have read that during the final stages of the battle for Tirana, the partisans were able to repair a couple of armored cars left over by the Italians, and used them to support the attack on the German lines inside the city.
Thank you, Malioni, that's exactly the sort of info I was looking for!
So the Soviets didn't give them anything until after the war?

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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 05 May 2013 18:20

That's correct. The Soviets brought in weapons after the liberation.

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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 09 May 2013 16:21

After the Armistice of 1943, hundreds of Italian soldiers and officers joined the ranks of the Partisan army.On October 8th,1943, 170 Italians under the command of then-Sargent Terzilio Cardinali(Medaglia d'Oro al Valor Militare) formed the Partisan battalion Antonio Gramsci. After a few months of fighting, and after losing roughly 130 men, among which Cardinali himself, the battalion was reformed and became part of the 1st Shock Brigade under the command of Mehmet Shehu.

Same source as for the photos above
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zastava128
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by zastava128 » 14 May 2013 12:10

Thanks again. By the way, I've found in the book Hrvatski Ratnici kroz stoljeca: Partizani: Oruzana sila Komunisticke partije Hrvatske i Komunisticke partije Jugoslavije 1941-1945 by Tomislav Aralica (2011), p.146 confirmation that the Yugoslav partisans dispatched some of their surplus weaponry to the Albanian partisans in spring-summer 1944. This consisted mostly of SMLE rifles and other weapons the Yugoslavs didn't like (the book doesn't specify which ones).

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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 16 May 2013 03:34

zastava128 wrote:Thanks again. By the way, I've found in the book Hrvatski Ratnici kroz stoljeca: Partizani: Oruzana sila Komunisticke partije Hrvatske i Komunisticke partije Jugoslavije 1941-1945 by Tomislav Aralica (2011), p.146 confirmation that the Yugoslav partisans dispatched some of their surplus weaponry to the Albanian partisans in spring-summer 1944. This consisted mostly of SMLE rifles and other weapons the Yugoslavs didn't like (the book doesn't specify which ones).
Hi! This is actually the first time that I hear of such a thing. Although the Albanian communist party was created under the tutelage of the Yugoslav one, I have never heard of weapons transfer or material aid of any kind. Are you sure that the weapons went to Albania or the Kosovo Albanian partisan units?

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zastava128
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by zastava128 » 19 May 2013 17:45

malioni91 wrote:
zastava128 wrote:Thanks again. By the way, I've found in the book Hrvatski Ratnici kroz stoljeca: Partizani: Oruzana sila Komunisticke partije Hrvatske i Komunisticke partije Jugoslavije 1941-1945 by Tomislav Aralica (2011), p.146 confirmation that the Yugoslav partisans dispatched some of their surplus weaponry to the Albanian partisans in spring-summer 1944. This consisted mostly of SMLE rifles and other weapons the Yugoslavs didn't like (the book doesn't specify which ones).
Hi! This is actually the first time that I hear of such a thing. Although the Albanian communist party was created under the tutelage of the Yugoslav one, I have never heard of weapons transfer or material aid of any kind. Are you sure that the weapons went to Albania or the Kosovo Albanian partisan units?
It's just an off-hand mention that Tito dispatched small arms to the Greek and Albanian partisans, which was part of his plan to create a grand Balkan empire with himself as a great leader (the author really doesn't like Tito!). Anyway, it definitely refers to partisans in Albania, not just Kosovo.

I've returned the book to the library, but next time I'm there it I'll check if he gives a source for this claim.

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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by Chinaski1917 » 24 May 2013 08:26

Are there any photos or newspaper articles on protests in early April 1939 against the imminent Italian invasion ?

That's what I've read. That Albanians protested and asked from Zog to provide arms so as to fight off the Italians. Also there is a mention that they demanded the release of imprisoned communists so as to fight.

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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by Chinaski1917 » 25 May 2013 08:07

Are Owen Pearson's numbers on the Albanian resistance credible ?

For the Albanian side:
Around (including civilians) 30,000 killed, 12,600 wounded and 44,500 imprisoned or deported

For the Axis side :
26,595 killed, 21,245 wounded and 20,800 prisoners.(Italian and German casualties)

malioni91
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Re: Albanian Resistance 1941-1944

Post by malioni91 » 28 May 2013 02:10

Chinaski1917 wrote:Are there any photos or newspaper articles on protests in early April 1939 against the imminent Italian invasion ?

That's what I've read. That Albanians protested and asked from Zog to provide arms so as to fight off the Italians. Also there is a mention that they demanded the release of imprisoned communists so as to fight.
Hello,
I have attached a photo of a protest held in Korca in April 1939 against the Italian invasion. I think the protest was held on the 6th of that month. There were several protests organized throughout the country. According to memoirs from politicians at the time, the people requested arms and ammunition and the organization of volunteer units. However, the royal government did not satisfy such demands. Later after the war, the communists even said that the King had ordered the army to take off the firing pins from the rifles that were in storage. The Chief of Staff of the Royal Army fled before the country a few hours before the invasion.
As for the release of imprisoned communists, I don't know. However, they all were able to escape from prison during the invasion. Among them Qemal Stafa who later during the war, would become a key member of the Communist Party.
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