An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Discussions on all (non-biographical) aspects of the Freikorps, Reichswehr, Austrian Bundesheer, Heer, Waffen-SS, Volkssturm and Fallschirmjäger and the other Luftwaffe ground forces. Hosted by Christoph Awender.
Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 16 May 2019 12:29

Gau 13 Kurhessen 24 Volkssturm-Bataillon

https://picclick.co.uk/rare-WW2-Volksst ... 40804.html

Kampfgruppe Bahl Volkssturmeinheit

https://forum.ww2.ru/index.php?showtopic=4264289

Volkssturm-Bataillon z.b.V 10/21

https://www.sammlermarkt-nord.net/shop/ ... anguage=en

Volkssturm-Bataillon z.b.V 17/1

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ ... 1851044904

Volkssturm-Bataillon Schmidturm-Schwäb.Gmünd II

http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/photos-pa ... -2-a-3196/

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 16 May 2019 13:39

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 17 May 2019 14:26

MAJOR OVERSIGHT

I MISSED THE VOLKSSTURM PAGE 278 WHICH IS LISTED IN THE Deutsches Rotes Kreuz Vermisstenbildliste [DRK Missing persons list]

THIS SHOULD HAVE BEEN PLACED BETWEEN POST 347 AND 348. PLEASE SEE BELOW

I APOLIGISE FOR THIS

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=192705&start=345

http://193.159.223.62:8081/vbl/Truppena ... /TA_H.aspx
278 (1).jpg
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 17 May 2019 16:19

The Freikorps Sauerland (Free Corps of Sauerland), was a paramilitary association created by Gauleiter Albert Hoffmann in September 1944. The name was taken from the nationalist free corps active during the unrest immediately after World War One.[1] In October, the Freikorps was officially established, and accepted by the Party Chancellery of Nazi Germany, where Martin Bormann, head of the Volkssturm associated the Freikorps to his services, as they often completed tasks, missions, etc. with them in the final months of the war. Hoffmann saw the Freikorps Sauerland as an "elite unit" in his Gau Westfalen-Süd campaigns against Allied Forces (notably, this is also where Albert Hoffmann had served as the Gauleiter before war had broken out). Only volunteers were accepted.[1]

The Freikorps fought on the Western Front towards the later half of the Second World War. In April 1945, units of the Freikorps Sauerland fighting in Ruhrkessel (the Ruhr Pocket), suffered somewhat heavy losses from Commonwealth and Allied Forces. The Freikorps Sauerland was among many divisions and armies serving in Westphalia, Olsberg and Altenbüren [de], where the Brilon Circle of Westphalia was located.

Members of Volkssturm (Freikorps) Sauerland were issued field grey or brown uniforms from the Organisation Todt or RAD (the National Labor Service), and fitted with standard Volkssturm rank insignia.[1] Special insignia were established for the unit, consisting of a white cuff title bearing the inscription “Freikorps Sauerland”, a sleeve patch and a helmet decal.[1] Preserved helmets are usually from the Luftschutz (Air Protection Service) or of the M42 type. Weapons were usually older German and foreign (Czech, Italian, French, etc.) rifles, plus the ubiquitous Panzerfaust and hand grenades.[1]

1. Lepage, Jean-Denis (2016). Hitler's Armed Forces Auxiliaries: An Illustrated History of the Wehrmachtsgefolge, 1933-1945. United States: McFarland. p. 154. ISBN 9781476620886.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freikorps_Sauerland

Freikorps Sauerland was established by order of the National Socialist Area Leader (Gauleiter) of Gau Westphalia-South. The unit maintained an elite status by only accepting volunteers. Freikorps Sauerland continued to serve as a militia group for the Sauerland region through October 1944. After official constitution of the Volkssturm on 25 September 1944, the Freikorps Sauerland was fully established and incorporated into the Volkssturm.

Its strength consisted of several battalions including a regimental staff which was something of an exception within the Volkssturm structure. For every district within Sauerland one battalion of Volkssturm was raised. These factors coupled with the desire to accept only volunteers was a way of maintaining elite status within the larger Volkssturm structure. As a unit the Volkssturm Sauerland maintained its former title "Freikorps Sauerland" in keeping with its historical roots.

Members of Volkssturm Sauerland were issued field grey or brown uniforms from the Organization Todt or those from the National Labor Service (Reicharbeitdienst-RAD). A special insignia was established for the Volkssturm Sauerland units which consisted of a white cuff title bearing the inscription "Freikorps Sauerland."

A cloth sleeve insignia was also produced and worn in combination with the uniform. This insignia was also reproduced as a helmet decal that was sometimes worn on the left side of steel helmets. Like all Volksstrum units, the leadership and recruitment of "Freikorps Sauerland" was directly under the control of local National Socialist Party leaders as well as members of the General-SS (Allgemeine-SS).

From http://www.German-Helmets.com
c7d4fc86b1604400dc3726ca4d44af02.jpg
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 18 May 2019 03:03

Dear All

I have decided to take on the monumental task of converting the Tessin/DRK units to the my post. It is going take sometime. However please see below for an understanding of the situation.

Footnote

Es läßt sich nicht abschließend klären, in welcher Gesamt-Stärke der Volkssturm dann wirklich zum Einsatz kam, die Suchdienste führten nach 1945 zeitweise 175.000 vermißte Volkssturmmänner. Auch eine lückenlose Übersicht über die tatsächlich aufgestellten Volkssturmeinheiten läßt sich nicht gewinnen. Auch in den Vermißtenbildlisten des DRK bzw. im „Tessin“ sind die Volkssturm-Einheiten keinesfalls vollzählig erfaßt

Translation.

It can not be finally clarified in which overall strength of the Volkssturm then really used, the search services led after 1945 at times 175,000 missing Volkssturmmänner. Even a complete overview of the actually established Volkssturm units can not be known. The Volkssturm units are by no means completely recorded in the lists of missing persons in the DRK or in "Tessin"

http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/Sol ... turm-R.htm

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Edward L. Hsiao » 18 May 2019 21:16

Dear Sir,

Were there any more Freikorps that were raised and seen heavy combat late in WWII?

Edward L. Hsiao

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 04:05

Edward I have been able to identify the following Freikorps.

Freikorps "Adolf Hitler"
Freikorps "Adolf Hitler" München-Oberbayern
Freikorps "Mohnke"
Freikorps "Sauerland"
Freikorps "Widukind"
Freikorps "Bohmen"
Freikorps "Frankreich"

viewtopic.php?t=38219
viewtopic.php?t=64164
viewtopic.php?t=180473

Further there is an article/book on this very subject 'The End of the Freebooter Tradition: The Forgotten Freikorps Movement of 1944/45'

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... A0FA6C7E8B

Extract
One of the difficulties in thinking about postwar German history comes in trying to explain the apparent absence of a paramilitary effervescence accompanying the collapse of the Third Reich. Independent military formations—Freikorps—had played a role during the 1806–1813 period, and such units had appeared again during the stormy years from 1918 to 1923, so the seeming absence of such formations in 1944/45 is quite noticeable. Charles Maier called it one of the major surprises of postwar European politics. To some extent, this perception is illusory; in truth, there were a number of Freikorps launched in 1944/45, although they failed to make a military or political impact and were therefore quickly forgotten. Considering the integral connection between previous Freikorps and the development of modern German nationalism, their relative absence in 1944/45 warrants the historian’s attention.

I hope this helps

Most respectfully

Mark
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 14:04

I decided to undertake some further research based on Edward L. Hsiao question :- 'Were there any more Freikorps that were raised and seen heavy combat late in WWII?'

I discovered the following.

Freikorps "Bohmen" — Bohemian subsection of Freikorps "Adolf Hitler" [*]
Freikorps "Frankreich" — Freikorps supposedly formed by German stragglers in France
http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/2782/1/U615731.pdf

* "Freikorps Bohmen" see Ultra Document BT 9963, 9 April 1945, Ultra Micf. Collection, Reel 69? and Ultra Document KO 1581, 28 April 1945, Ultra Micf. Collection, Reel 73.

The "Freikorps Adolf Hitler" is nothing but the quasi-military organization of all these 'bosses', from the
local Ortsgruppenleiter at the bottom to the fat drunken Reichsleiter Ley at the top, whom the Werewolves
disown". While only a few misguided zealots were willing to fight ;on for the Nazi revolution, even fewer
were ready to sacrifice themselves for the sake of Party hacks and local political kingpins who hardly represented the idealistic side of the movement.

In Southwestern Germany, the "Freikorps Adolf Hitler" was also deployed against the so-called "inner enemy", particularly Bavarian separatists who rose in revolt at the end of April 1945. After the withdrawal of some six hundred Freikorps members from the collapsing front in Baden, a para-political task force was formed called "Gruppe Hans" so named because the regional chief of the "Freikorps Adolf Hitler" was the writer Hans Zoberlein.

Members of "Gruppe Hans" served in special execution squads code-named "Werwolf Oberbavern", who specialized in terrorizing "defeatists" and in breaking up the ranks of Bavarian particularists who re-emerged from the shadows as the Allies approached.

On 28 April, drunken squads of "Werwolf Oberbavern" reacted to separatist demonstrations in the town of Penzberg by launching a savage raid upon the community, which resulted in at least fifteen dead and in a hard fought shoot-out on the outskirts of town. Southern Bavaria was also flooded with "Werwolf Oberbavern" handbills, which showed the Wolfsanael and warned, "Our vengeance is death!”

In mid and late April, Freikorps units were actually deployed at the Front, especially at a number of points
in southwest Germany, and in Berlin? in the Czech Protectorate, a special formation, "Freikorps Bohmen", was also in the process of formation and deployment.

Freikorpsmanner faced the enemy in Wehrmacht camouflage uniforms and peaked caps, although instructions
stipulated that this uniform was to be quickly discarded in case of a switch-over to partisan activities, and it
is known that female "Freikorps Adolf Hitler" members often carried out reconnaissance missions in civilian clothes.

Freikorps troops fought alongside the Wehrmacht, and were usually deployed as one hundred man Gau contingents, although these groups were sub-divided into eight-to-ten man operational units, obviously preparatory to their conversion into partisan cells.

Finally, Goebbels noted that each Gau was supposed to contribute one hundred men, although this may have only been an initial allotment — in his diary, the Propaganda Minister mentioned that the Gauleiters were
actually capable of contributing ten thousand "activists' to the movement.


http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/2782/1/U615731.pdf

For the description of a seventy man Freikorps Adolf Hitler unit that withdrew into the Alps in April 1945 and was comprised almost entirely of “Politische Leiter,” see lère Armée française, 2ème Bureau, “Bulletin de renseignements,” 16 May 1945, Annex 4, Service historique de l’armée de terre, 7P 125.

CCG(BE) Research Branch, HQ/2424 (Res), The Freikorps, 7 June 1945, PRO, 371/46876; NA, Study on the Freikorps, NA, XL 17275, RG 226; and 21st AG, CI News Sheet no. 7, 5 October 1944, Part I, PRO, WO 205/997. See also Diehl, The Thanks of the Fatherland, 56–57. Influential officers like Colonel Dick White in SHAEF Counter-Intelligence—a future head of MI–5—were struck by the Freikorps precedent, and the “problems it created for the occupying forces.” White called this an “interesting and important” issue. White to Sheen and MacLoed, 12 February 1945, PRO, WO 219/1602.


Freikorps 'Widukind'

There was a Volkssturm unit called Freiwilligen-Regiment 'Widukind' [Volunteer Regiment 'Widukind']. At least one battalion, consisting of 400 Hitler Youth boys was set up in Borken (Westphalia) in mid-February 1945.

Since late February the battalion was garrisoned in a camp near Haltern. After the Allies had crossed the Lower Rhine at Wesel the battalion was alarmed on Mar 29th, 1945 and shipped by truck to Albachten, SW of Münster. Münster was the capital of Gau Westfalen-Nord. In Albachten the battalion was split up. Only the fate of one of its companies is known. This company marched from Albachten via Hiltrup and Albersloh to Sendenhorst-Ringhöfen (SW of Münster) on the next day. On Saturday noon they were attacked by an US tank unit in Ringhöfen and surrendered after several of the boys had been KIA.


Source:
http://www.heimatverein-sendenhorst.de/ ... fecht.html

For sources on the "White Maquis", the "Blue Maquis," and "Freikorps Frankreich" see FO Weekly
Political Intelligence Summaries. Vol. 10, 8 NOv. 1944, Summary #266, p. 2? SHAEF PWD Report,
"Perpignon and the Spanish Border", 24 Nov. 1944, pp. 1-4, OSS XL 2356, RG 226, NA? OSS Report from
France, FQ-132, 25 Nov. 1944, OSS L 50164, RG 226, NA? 5th Army G-2 Sect. Interrogation Center, Report
#1135, 21 June 1045, pp. 7, 8-9, 15, 21, OSS XL 11790, RG 226, NA? USFET Military Intelligence Center "Intermediate Interrogation Report (IIR) #14 - Obst. Kurrer", 17 Aug. 1945, OSS XL 15372, RG 226, NA? USFET Interrogation Center "Intermediate Interrogation Report (IIR) #9 — H/Stuf. H. Gerlach", 11 Aug. 1945, pp. 12, 18, OSS XL 13744, RG 226, NA? The New York Times. 30 Oct. 1944? 10 Dec. 1944? and 21 Jan. 1945.

"Freikorps Sauerland"

http://www.plettenberg-lexikon.de/a-z/freikorps.htm

39 der Gau die Römischen Ziffern das Battalion z.b XV (15) die 2 würde dann für die Kompanie stehen Und D.V erklärt sich ja selbt.

http://www.vojna.net/portal/viewtopic.php?t=694

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 14:06

Freikorps Adolf Hitler

Das Freikorps Adolf Hitler war ein gegen Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges in Deutschland aufgestellter Kampfverband des Volkssturms.

Am 28. März 1945 wurde von Adolf Hitler die Aufstellung des nach ihm benannten Verbandes verfügt (Aufstellungsverfügung siehe BA-ZNS/WA 11g). Wie Reichspropagandaminister Joseph Goebbels den Gauleitern der NSDAP am 30. März in einem Brief mitteilte, sollte sich dieser aus „Aktivisten der Bewegung, Freiwilligen des Volkssturms und Freiwilligen der Werkschar“ zusammensetzen und von Robert Ley, dem Reichsorganisationsleiter der NSDAP und Führer der Deutschen Arbeitsfront, kommandiert werden; jeder Gau sollte einen „Gauschwarm“ von 1000 Mann aufstellen. Die Kandidaten für das Freikorps sollten im Sinne der NSDAP politisch geschult sein und über eine militärische Grundausbildung verfügen. Die Ablehnung einer Freiwilligenmeldung aus dem Grunde der Unabkömmlichkeit des Freiwilligen in der Verwaltung sei aufgrund der dringenden Kriegslage nicht statthaft. Jeder Freiwillige sei mit einer Lebensmittelration für drei Tage auszustatten.

Die Aufstellung der „Gauschwärme“, die in „Kreisschwärme“ und „Einzelschwärme“ gegliedert wurden, sollte auf den Truppenübungsplätzen der Wehrmacht, die im Gau lagen, erfolgen. Die Uniform sollte aus Trainingshose, Uniformjacke, Mütze, Tarnanzug und Armbinde mit der Aufschrift „Freikorps Adolf Hitler“ bestehen, die Bewaffnung aus Sturmgewehren, Panzerfäusten und Handgranaten. Fahrräder sollten ihnen eine gewisse Mobilität verleihen.

Die Einheiten wurden für den Einsatz dem Heer unterstellt und von diesem auch versorgt. Von der Wehrmacht wurden die Einheiten als Panzerjagdkommandos oder Panzerjagdverbände bezeichnet.

So kämpften Verbände des Freikorps „Adolf Hitler“ wie der Panzerjagdverband „Döberitz“ („Gauschwarm Berlin“) und der Panzerjagdverband „Munster“ bis zur Kapitulation im Rahmen der 12. Armee westlich von Berlin.

https://www.wikizero.com/de/Volkssturm# ... olf_Hitler

Translated

Freikorps Adolf Hitler

The Freikorps Adolf Hitler was at the end of the Second World War in Germany established Kampfverband of the Volkssturm.

On March 28, 1945 Adolf Hitler ordered the formation of the named after him Association (installation order see BA-CNS / WA 11g). As Reich Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels wrote in a letter to the Gauleiters of the NSDAP on March 30, this should be composed of "activists of the movement, volunteers of the Volkssturm and volunteers of the work crowd" and Robert Ley, the Reich Organization Director of the NSDAP and leaders of the German Labor Front, to be commanded; each Gau should set up a "Gauschwarm" of 1000 men. The candidates for the Freikorps should be politically trained in the sense of the NSDAP and have a basic military training. The refusal of a volunteer report for the reason of the unavailability of the volunteer in the administration was not allowed due to the urgent war situation.

The formation of "Gauschwärme", which were divided into "Circular swarms" and "individual swarms", should take place on the military training areas of the Wehrmacht, which were in Gaus. The uniform was to consist of sweatpants, uniform jacket, cap, camouflage suit and armband with the inscription "Freikorps Adolf Hitler", the armament of assault rifles, bazookas and hand grenades. Bicycles should give them some mobility.

The units were subordinated to the army for use and also supplied by this. By the Wehrmacht units were referred to as Panzerjagdkommandos or Panzerjagdverbände.

For example, associations of the Freikorps "Adolf Hitler" such as the Panzerjagdverband "Döberitz" ("Gauschwarm Berlin") and the Panzerjagdverband "Munster" fought until surrender under the 12th Army west of Berlin.


https://www.wikizero.com/de/Volkssturm# ... olf_Hitler
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 14:10

Freikorps und Volkssturm

Der Name „Volkssturm“ war für alle Einheiten verbindlich. Er konnte durch nichts ersetzt werden. Als der Gauleiter von Tirol-Vorarlberg wünschte, daß die Verbände seines Gaus die traditionelle Bezeichnung „Standschützen“ tragen sollten, lehnte Bormann die Verwendung dieses Begriffs ab. Diese Abfuhr hinderte den Gauleiter jedoch nicht daran, seine Volkssturmeinheiten gauintern als Standschützen zu bezeichnen und ihnen sogar eigene Ärmelabzeichen in Rautenform mit dem Tiroler Adler und der Inschrift „Standschützen Bataillon“, ergänzt durch den Ortsnamen, zu verschaffen.

Der Gauleiter von Westfalen-Süd, Albert Hoffmann, der die bereits als SA-Sturmbann-Namen bestehende Bezeichnung „Freikorps Sauerland“ übernehmen wollte, mußte von Bormann hören, daß „von irgendwelchen Zusätzen symbolischer, heimatlicher oder geschichtlicher Art“ abzusehen sei. Trotz dieser Belehrung hielt das „Freikorps Sauerland“ auch im Rahmen des Volkssturms an seinem Namen fest und trug ein nie genehmigtes Ärmelabzeichen.

Diese Eigenmächtigkeiten bestimmter Gauleiter zeigen deutlich, daß sich Bormann selbst bei eigentlich nebensächlichen Kleinigkeiten nicht mehr in der Partei durchsetzen konnte.

In den letzten Kriegstagen erscheinen noch zahlreiche Phantasiebezeichnungen für Volkssturmeinheiten, die allerdings nie offiziell geführt wurden. So erscheint bei den Kämpfen um Berlin ein „Freikorps Mohnke“ und ein „Freikorps Adolf Hitler“. Als „Freikorps Adolf Hitler“ bezeichnete sich auch eine Volkssturmeinheit im Raum München-Oberbayern unter Führung des NS-Schriftstellers Hans Zöberlein. Dieses Freikorps tat sich allerdings nicht im Kampf gegen die Alliierten, sondern vor allem im Terror gegen die eigene Bevölkerung hervor. Auf Weisung Zöberleins wurden im Raum Penzberg mehrere Zivilpersonen erhängt, die eine Übergabe ihrer Wohnorte an die Alliierten vorbereitet hatten.

http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/Sol ... ssturm.htm
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 14:14

Translation

Freikorps and Volkssturm

The name "Volkssturm" was binding for all units. He could not be replaced by anything. When the Gauleiter of Tyrol-Vorarlberg wished that the associations of his Gaus should carry the traditional designation "Standschützen", Bormann rejected the use of this term. However, this refusal did not prevent the Gauleiter from calling his Volkssturm units Standschützen and even their own sleeve badges in diamond shape with the Tyrolean eagle and the inscription "Freikorps Sauerland", supplemented by the place name to procure.

The Gauleiter of Westphalia South, Albert Hoffmann, who wanted to take over the already existing as SA Sturmbann name designation "Freikorps Sauerland", had to hear from Bormann that "of any additions of symbolic, native or historical nature" can be foreseen. Despite this instruction, the "Freikorps Sauerland" kept its name as part of the Volkssturm and wore a never approved sleeve patch.

These arbitrary powers of certain Gauleiter clearly show that Bormann could not prevail in the party even in trivial matters.

In the last days of the war numerous fantasy names for Volkssturm units appear, which, however, were never officially led. Thus, in the fighting for Berlin a "Freikorps Mohnke" and a "Freikorps Adolf Hitler" appears. Also referred to as "Freikorps Adolf Hitler" is a Volkssturm unit in the Munich-Upper Bavaria area under the leadership of Nazi writer Hans Zöberlein. However, this Freikorps did not emerge in the fight against the Allies, but above all in the terror against its own population. On Zöberlein's instructions, several civilians were hanged in the Penzberg area to prepare a transfer of their residence to the Allies.

http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/Sol ... ssturm.htm

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 17:25

Capture.PNG
Zeitungsanzeige-Freikorps.jpg
http://www.alt-plettenberg.de/ns-zeit-u ... -sauerland
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 17:43

From The Theory of the Partisan - C ARL SCHMITT

The appearance at the end of the German war (1944/45) cannot be attributed to the German Wehrmacht, but rather are to be explained by opposition to it: the German Volkssturm and the so-called Werwolf. The
Volkssturm was called into existence by a decree of 25 September 1944 as a territorial militia for the defense of the country whose members were considered in their deployment as soldiers in the sense of the law of military service [Wehrgesetz] and combatants in the sense of the Hague Ground War Provision.

The publication by General Major Hans Kissel, who was Chief of Staff of the German Volkssturm from November 1944 onwards, [44] details its organization, armament, deployment, fighting spirit, and losses. Kissel notes that in the west the Volkssturm was recognized by the Allies as a fighting troop, while the Russians considered it a partisan organization and they shot their prisoners. In contradistinction to this territorial militia, the Werwolf was meant to be a partisan organization for the youth.

Dixon and Heilbrunn’s book tells us about the result: “A few prospective Werwölfe were captured by the Allies and that was the end of the matter.” The Werwolf has been described as “an effort to unleash a children’s sniper
war.” 24a

24a. Hans Kissel, Der Deutsche Volkssturm 1944/45, eine territoriale Miliz der Landesverteidigung (Frankfurt am Main: E. S. Mittler & Sohn, 1962); for information on the different treatment in the east and west, cf. 46. The word Kinderheckenschützenkrieg [children’s sniper war] comes from Erich F. Pruck in his review of Kissel’s book in Zeitschrift für Politik, (n. s.) 9 (1962) 298/99. Pruck rightly observes that “the boundary between legal combat mission (in the sense of the Hague Ground War Provision) and partisanship is unclear.” Dixon and Heilbrunn, op. cit., 3.

Page 27 http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/spacesho ... rtisan.pdf

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 22 May 2019 17:50

The Volkssturm comprised one of the final components of the total war promulgated by Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels, part of a Nazi endeavor to overcome their enemies' military strength through force of will.

Kershaw, Ian (2011). The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler’s Germany, 1944–1945. New York: Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-14312-213-5. pp. 713–714

CHAPTER III. OTHER MILITARY AND AUXILIARY ORGANIZATIONS

Section II. AUXILIARY ORGANIZATIONS


Volkssturm

Founded by Hitler in October 1944, this national militia organization represents an ultimate effort to mobilize all available manpower for employment in total war. It includes all German men between the ages of sixteen and sixty who are not in the Armed Forces and who are able to bear arms. The members of the Volkssturm are described as soldiers for the duration of their employment, which is to take place locally wherever a given area is threatened. The Volkssturm has the mission of reinforcing the active strength of the Armed Forces and defending German soil to the last. It is recruited under the auspices of the Party, whose formations join in providing its cadres and officers. The leadership in the Party regions is assigned to the Gauleiter, the rifle training to the SA, and the automotive training to the NSKK. Beyond that all installations and institutions of the Party serve to form and train the new units. Himmler, as Commander of the Replacement Army, is responsible for the organization of the Volkssturm and for ordering its mobilization and employment in any particular area.

U.S. War Department Technical Manual, TM-E 30-451: Handbook on German Military Forces published in March 1945

http://www.lonesentry.com/manuals/tme30/ch3sec2.html

d. MILITIA (Volkssturm) UNITS.

In October, 1944 a decree was issued by Hitler calling up all able-bodied German men between the ages of 16 and 60 for the defense of the Fatherland. That decree calls for the creation of a people's militia (Volkssturm) under the leadership of Himmler in his function as Commander-in-Chief of the Replacement Training Army.

It is believed that the Party in general, and the Storm Troop Organization (SA) and the National Socialist Motor Corps (NSKK) in particular, have been charged with the part time training of these men who are to remain on their jobs until a direct threat endangers their area. In such an emergency they will be called to the ranks, come under the command of the army, and be issued weapons, brassards with the inscription "Deutscher Volkssturm Wehrmacht" and identification papers as members of the German Armed Forces. Their employment probably is limited to defensive fighting in trenches, woods, and streets, since their units are equipped with small automatic weapons, machine guns, and bazookas only, but it is possible that light and medium mortars will be added later.

It is difficult to determine definitely the tables of organization for militia units as these will vary greatly in accordance with local conditions and the manpower and weapons available, but indications from the front lines point toward the following average tables of organization for the basic militia unit, the Militia Battalion.

In some cases several militia battalions may be combined in a militia regiment.

http://www.lonesentry.com/manuals/tme30 ... sub21.html

Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 24 May 2019 16:39

Deutsche Volkssturm or Deutsche Volkswehr or Deutsche Landsturm

The story behind the creation of the Volkssturm and it's name.

'In a telex Gauleiter Koch sent via Bormann to Hitler immediately after 20 July, the Gauleiter proposed that 'the entire population [in East Prussia) capable of bearing arms should be called up in a levee en masse, armed, and rushed to the border'. This general levy- Koch called it 'a kind of Landsturm'- should consist of East Prussian men who were fit for military service and had been in reserved occupations, and it should be raised and trained by the Party. It would, he suggested, be sent into action under the command of the army commander concerned when there was an immediate threat by the enemy. The Landsturm Koch was proposing for East Prussia was thus not part of the standing army, but a militia-like force to be activated only in a defence crisis and whose members would, once the enemy had been successfully repelled, go back to their civilian jobs.

Guderian quickly adopted this idea of a militia-like Landsturm for East Prussia, but set different priorities from Koch. He told Wilheln Schepmann, chief of staff of the SA supreme command, of the scheme, suggesting to him that the Landsturm planned for East Prussia should be raised by the SA. He was taking over Koch's concept of making use, in the event of Russian breakthrough, of men who were fit for military service but in reserved occupations. Schepmann gracefully accepted Guderian's offer. On 4 September 1944 he telephoned Hans Muller, one of Bormann's personal advisers, in order to go the whole hog; he asked to have all men remaining at home given military training by the SA-that is to say he was wanting the Landsturm to be set up as a militia throughout me Reich, not just in East Prussia. Control of this Reich-wide body was to lie with the SA. Schepmann was clearly angling through Bormann to have a Fuhrer decree issued that gave this task to the SA. To lend his request me necessary emphasis he pointed to me examples of Salzburg and Oberdonau, where the Gauleiters had, he said, already quite a long time ago urged the leaders of the SA to give the male inhabitants military training.

The head of the Party chancellery at once told the Reichsfuhrer SS what Schepmann was aiming at; not least because of the traditional rivalry between the SS and SA, Himmler turned it clown. As head of army armament (Chef der Heeresrustung, ChHRust) and commander of the replacement army, the Reichsfuhrer SS at this rime carried most weight in any discussions on the Landsturm, since me planned militia would have to be supplied with weapons and ammunition. Bormann and Himmler quickly came to an agreement to take the Landsturm under their own wings. Bormann had a Fuhrer decree on the formation of a German national defence force (Volkswehr) drawn up, under which the political leadership of this force would fall to the Party chancellery and its military deployment to the Reichsfiihrer SS. The Party chancellery men rejected the SA's request to lead the national defence force, giving Schepmann the post of inspector of small-arms training. Meanwhile the draft of the Fuhrer decree no longer used the term Deutsche Volkswehr, but rather Volkssturm.

On 25 September 1944 Bormann had the draft signed by Hitler. In the 'Fuhrer decree on the formation of the 'Deutscher Volkssturm', which was not published in the Reichsgeserzblatt until a month later, Hitler ordered that 'a German Volkssturm be formed in all Gaue of the Greater German Reich, from all men aged 16 to 60 able to bear arms' to defend 'the soil of the homeland with all weapons and all means'. The raising and leading of the Volkssturm lay in the hands of the Gauleiters, who received their guidance from the head of the Party chancellery. The training, arming, and equipping of this force was to be done 'by the Reichsfuhrer SS as commander of the replacement army'. This wording was used to avoid the Volkssturm being under a military authority-for Bormann and his staff it was a 'Party matter'.'

GenStdH/GendPiuFest/Abt. Landesbdestigung No. 13 673/44 g.Kdos., sgd. Guderian
(29 Dec. 1944), BA-MA RH 2/3177.

This and what follows according to Koch telex to Bormann (21 July 1944), BANS 6/780, 3-5.

The Landsturm Koch was introducing had nothing to do with the 'Landsturm duty' for East
Prussia that had been enacted after the defence law act of 21 May 1935; see RGBJ. I, 1935, 694>
and Absolon, Wehrmacht im Dritten Reich, iii 81- 4 .

This name-change must have occurred on 22 Sept. 1944; see Friedrich telex Bormann
(22 Sept. 1944), BANS 6/313, 161- 4. On the previous day Goebbels was still speaking of Hitler
having now ordered the raising of a 'Deutsche Volkswehr'; see Goebbels, Tagebucher, pt. 2, xiii.
534- 5 (21 Sept. 1944).


Germany and the Second World War - Volume 9 Page 195-196
Bernhard Chiari, ‎Germany. Militärgeschichtliches Forschungsamt

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