1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Discussions on all aspects of Poland during the Second Polish Republic and the Second World War. Hosted by Piotr Kapuscinski.
User avatar
henryk
Member
Posts: 2490
Joined: 27 Jan 2004 01:11
Location: London, Ontario

1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Post by henryk » 03 Dec 2021 20:50

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox ... qVdhFWJpdL
Gen Dobry: Volume XXII, No. 1 30 November2022
**** AN INTERESTING BIT OF HISTORY ***
Former world chess champion Garry Kasparov, now a pro-democracy activist, posted on Twitter this image, explaining, “Interesting find by my cousin, a Russian poster from 1923 calling Poland an ‘annoying obstacle’ to relations between Russia and Germany. A year after their 1922 Rapallo Treaty. The seeds of teaming up to destroy Poland were planted long before 1939.”

The verbiage at the top reads Дорогу нашему хрестьянскому хлебу в обмен на германские сельско-хозяйственные машины и орудия, “The route for our peasant bread in exchange for German agricultural machinery and implements.” And guess what’s in the middle, blocking the railroad lines between Germany and the Soviet Union? Польша, Poland!
I hope the Cyrillic font copied OK
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

sarhang
Member
Posts: 96
Joined: 19 Mar 2012 10:22

Re: 1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Post by sarhang » 04 Dec 2021 16:24

True to say, one could hardly term this naive poster as totally devoid of insight.

gebhk
Member
Posts: 2002
Joined: 25 Feb 2013 20:23

Re: 1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Post by gebhk » 04 Dec 2021 18:53

Hardly surprising. Poland was perhaps the one thing they could alweays agree on!

wwilson
Member
Posts: 234
Joined: 29 Sep 2012 08:33

Re: 1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Post by wwilson » 05 Dec 2021 08:28

gebhk wrote:
04 Dec 2021 18:53
Hardly surprising. Poland was perhaps the one thing they could alweays agree on!
Surprised me to note how "Poland" is spoken in the Russian language. I would have thought it would have been "Polska", as in Polish.

Cheers

gebhk
Member
Posts: 2002
Joined: 25 Feb 2013 20:23

Re: 1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Post by gebhk » 05 Dec 2021 11:38

Hi Wwilson

I don't think there is any rational pattern to how people call other contries :? Just look how the British call a certain country 'Denmark'. Who are the Dens? 8O

You may be even more surprised that most Muslim folk in the Southern Soviet 'republcs' to which members of my family were deported, had never heard of 'Polska' or even 'Polsha' but immediately recognised Lechistan - indeed with great repect; even reverence if they were Shia.

wwilson
Member
Posts: 234
Joined: 29 Sep 2012 08:33

Re: 1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Post by wwilson » 05 Dec 2021 14:59

Just look how the British call a certain country 'Denmark'
Fair enough, but I'll point out that when I hear English spoken, it doesn't sound much like Danish. By way of comparison, by knowing a bit of one Slavic language, I've been surprised to realize that I can (at times) understand things spoken in a different Slavic language. I assumed the Russian word for 'Poland' would be the same as the Poles' word for it. But yeah, that is an arbitrary assumption. :)

Cheers

gebhk
Member
Posts: 2002
Joined: 25 Feb 2013 20:23

Re: 1923 USSR Anti-Polish Poster

Post by gebhk » 05 Dec 2021 19:50

OOh you maybe undervalue the profund if now subtle impact of Danish rule on these here Islands back in the day, which can be seen for example in the peculiar traditional management of the land for agriculture. But I digress.

My best guess is that the unusual English name for Denmark (pretty much everyone else in Europe uses some sort of derivative of Dan ie Danmark, Dania, Daniya, Danemark, Danimarca - unless they go completely off the rails like the Fins - I love the Fins and Finland but trying to decipher Finnish just gives me a nosebleed) came to England with the Frisians and Dutch. And here's the rub - their languages are allegedly virtually indistinguishable from Danish - it has been said that they are more similar than English and American though i suspect that is an exagerraton. And yet they call Danmark Denemark/Denemarken.

Return to “Poland 1919-1945”