Flying pancake?

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Christian W.
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Flying pancake?

Post by Christian W. » 31 Aug 2004 23:19

I read somehwhere that the germans had a fighter that looked like an saucer, i dont remember its German name but for Finnish it was " lentävä pannukakku " ( flying pancake ). I know the English name may sound stupid but..does anyonone have any info about this?

I know that the thing did exist because the book where i read about it contained some drawings. :?

Hop
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Post by Hop » 31 Aug 2004 23:32

The Americans had a prototype nicknamed the Flying Pancake, the Vought XF5U.

http://www.daveswarbirds.com/usplanes/a ... apjack.htm

I'm not aware of any similar German aircraft.

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USAF1986
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Post by USAF1986 » 31 Aug 2004 23:42

Hi! Could it be the Horten Ho 229? Here’s a drawing of the H IX V-3, a.k.a. the Ho 229, a.k.a. the Gotha Go 229, from the source cited below. The aircraft actually built had a slightly different flap arrangement from that shown in the drawing. This aircraft was captured by U.S. forces at the end of the war and is currently in storage in the annex of the National Air and Space Museum in Silver Hill, Maryland.

Best regards,
Shawn

SOURCE: Dabrowski, H.P. The Horten Flying Wing in World War II: The History & Development of the Ho 229. David Johnston, translator. Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., Atglen, Pennsylvania, 1991 (originally published in Germany as Nurflügel, Die Ho 229 – Vorläufer der heutigen B2).
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bryson109
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Post by bryson109 » 01 Sep 2004 01:16

Could it also be the Sack AS-7? Maybe the Term "Flying Pancake" applies to more than one a/c.


http://www.sunlight.de/x-plane/jbx/as7.htm

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Topspeed
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Post by Topspeed » 01 Sep 2004 06:35

I think this the one that caused the FLYING SAUCER hysteria:

http://www.luft46.com/fw/fwvtol.html


regards,

Juke T :D
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Christian W.
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Post by Christian W. » 01 Sep 2004 10:02

Yes, Sack AS-6 , thats the one.

I agree, Sack AS-6 and Focke-Wulf VTOL were probably the ones that caused the " UFO " and flying saucer hysteria, but who really knows.

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davethelight
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Post by davethelight » 03 Sep 2004 11:12

I have seen drawings of the flying pancake that the Germans experimented with during the war, but I can't remember where, it was some years ago. The aircraft I saw wasn't anyhting like the Ho 229, it was virtually a flat oval shaped thing, with two piston engines.

gabriel pagliarani
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Post by gabriel pagliarani » 06 Sep 2004 16:40

"Pancake" is a well defined Allied military radio-com term: it is a close combat-zone between 2 pre-defined flight levels in which "bandits" are engaged in a dogfight.

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Re:

Post by Cantankerous » 14 Mar 2021 20:44

bryson109 wrote:
01 Sep 2004 01:16
Could it also be the Sack AS-7? Maybe the Term "Flying Pancake" applies to more than one a/c.


http://www.sunlight.de/x-plane/jbx/as7.htm
The AS-7 was an enlarged version of the AS-6 with one Daimler-Benz DB 605 and six MK 108 cannons, but was not built. The AS-1, AS-2, AS-3, AS-4, and AS-5 were subscale demonstrators for the AS-6.

The circular saucer-shaped plane built by Sack differed from the V-173 and F5U in that the engines were not placed on the sides of the wings (which Charles Zimmermann thought was crucial for short takeoff runs and greater lift).

Link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sack_AS-6

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