Could the Baltic States have resisted to the Soviet Union?

Discussions on WW2 in Eastern Europe.
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Lit.
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Post by Lit. » 23 Jan 2005 16:00

Here is more "fashion" for "winter sports" in occupied Lithuania:
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Lit.
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Post by Lit. » 23 Jan 2005 16:23

Annelie wrote:The fight to differentiate it seems is still in the process?


Unfortunately - yes. But also other fights are in progress in this - the last Colonial Empire - the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria - is still fighting with Russians. And Russia behave there nearly the same as was in the Baltic states, and even worse. And still no support...

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Post by Annelie » 23 Jan 2005 16:27

Lit

But also other fights are in progress in this - the last Colonial Empire - the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria - is still fighting with Russians. And Russia behave there nearly the same as was in Baltic states, and even worse. And still no support...


Politics.

Yes, there should be support but how one applies support is dictated by politics sadly.

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Post by Lit. » 26 Jan 2005 13:59

Information for those who are living or will be in Chicago in March. There is a posibility to see a.m. movie "Vienu vieni" about Juozas Luksa - "Daumantas" in the eighth annual edition of the European Union Film Festival that will be in March 4-24, 2005.

UTTERLY ALONE
(VIENUI VIENI)

2004, Jonas Vaitkus, Lithuania, 90 min.
With Saulius Balandis, Brigita Bublyte

The most successful Lithuanian film of recent years is this compelling historical drama by leading film and theater director Jonas Vaitkus. Filmed in black-and-white, it tells the true story of legendary freedom fighter Juozas Luksa, who in the 1940s was one of the leading figures in the resistance against the Soviet annexation of Lithuania. After his family was decimated by partisan fighting, Luksa traveled through Western Europe seeking support for the cause and then returned to Lithuania for a final encounter with the KGB. In Lithuanian with English subtitles. 35mm print courtesy of Forum Cinemas. (MR)
http://www.siskelfilmcenter.org/


The most anticipated film of the year in Lithuania. Well-known theatre and film director Jonas Vaitkus directs a cast of prominent Lithuanian performers in a compelling historical drama that tells the tragic, heroic story of legendary Lithuanian freedom fighter Juozas Lukša and his family. Lukša was a key figure in the Lithuanian resistance against the Soviets, which continued for a decade after 1940's forcible annexation, claimed the lives of 22,000 partisans, and saw some 300,000 Lithuanians exiled or interned. Two of Lukša's brothers were killed in the fighting; two others were sent to Siberia by the Soviets. The toll on the family left Lukša's father a broken man. During the conflict, Lukša travelled to Western Europe as a representative of the underground, lobbying for the cause and seeking foreign support. While abroad, he met and married Nijole, a Lithuanian woman. Lukša returned home to continue the armed struggle, only to fall into the clutches of the KGB at the age of 30.
http://www.eufilmfestival.com/night11.htm#lithuania


The movie is interesting only because of the theme (unfortunately not because of the artistic values).

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Post by Lit. » 28 Jan 2005 20:07

Still more winter pics of occupied Lithuania including (the "Light Armed Vehicle" :) ). All numbers on all pictures are made by Soviet MVD-KGB. Here is the interesting picture of "Vanagas" and "Faustas" taken on their way to the famous meeting of all Commanders of Lithuanian armed resistance, where historical declaration (of 16th February 1949) was made (see a.m. quote and link). P.S.: This picture is dated 1949.02.04 but not 1948, that I've wrongly wrote.

Comment about the owner of the 1st picture:
"June 14, 1988 was the day, when the Lithuanian Freedom League dared to hold a meeting at Gediminas Square. Commemorated at this meeting was the mass exile of the Lithuanian population, which had been started in June of 1941 by Stalin. L. Laurinskas (living in Taurage - Lit.), a post-war resistent, publicly raised the forbidden tri-colour Lithuanian flag during the meeting."
http://www.lietuva.lt/index.php?Lang=5&ItemId=27829
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Post by Lit. » 29 Jan 2005 19:56

Here is an interesting pick of young Lithuanian Freedom fighter of "Vytautas" military district - Vladas Matuliauskas - "Riesutas" ("The Nut") (1931.03.10-1951 KIA), armed with Sudayev machine-gun, model 1943. Picture dated - summer of 1949.

Vladas Matuliauskas escaped while exiling to Siberia (where all his family was sent by the Soviets in the cattle wagons) and joined the ranks of Lithuanian partisans in 1948. He became Lithuanian Freedom Fighter of "Dumas" platoon, "Jovaras" company, "Vytautas" military district. Fell in the battle with Soviet MGB forces in the village of Migdoliskiai, Anyksciai region. He was too brave and to honest to became an ordinary "Soviet citizen", but also to young to die.
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Post by Annelie » 29 Jan 2005 23:04

Thankyou Lit for bringing to our attention the story of this Lithunian Freedom Fighter
Vladas Matuliauskas.



Fell in the battle with Soviet MGB forces in the village of Migdoliskiai, Anyksciai region. He was too brave and to honest to became an ordinary "Soviet citizen", but also to young to die.


Some people die for no reason but to die for a cause that you believe in is noteworthy and I am
glad that he is remembered.

Annelie

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Post by Lit. » 30 Jan 2005 11:40

Platoon commander from the "Vytis" military district Vaclovas Pauliukonis - "Girenas". Born in 1927 village of Vareikiai, Deltuva distr. Ukmerge region. Joined the ranks of Lithuanian freedom fighters in 1948, to J.Baravykas - "Vygantas" platoon. After "Vygantas" was KIA in 1949, "Girenas" became a platoon commander himself and fought till 1952 July 11th, when was killed in the action in Kindzeliskis forest, Ukmerge region.
Average term to stay alive in this Soviet-Lithuanian war was approximately 2 years only. So "Girenas" made it double. Probably was the same better then average, also lucky enough.
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Post by Lit. » 30 Jan 2005 17:46

3 fighters from the "Azuolas" ("The Oak") platoon, "Kunigaikstis Zvelgaitis" ("The Duke Zvelgaitis") brigade, "Prisikelimas" ("Resurrection") military district. From the left: unknown; Rokas Ramanauskas - "Zvejys" ("Fisherman"); Juozas Kumpis - "Arnas".

Rokas Ramanauskas - "Zvejys" (1916-1951 KIA). Joined the ranks of Lithuanian armed resistance in 1948. He (together with his 10 years younger brother Stasys Ramanauskas - "Linksmutis") was killed in the fight with Russian Army in 1951 October 28, Girkanciai forest.

Juozas Kumpis - "Cvirka", later "Arnas" (1917-1952 08 13). Joined the armed fight with Russian occupants in 1944, as partisan of "Genys" ("Vovere") brigade. Later became commander of "Azuolas" platoon in "Prisikelimas" military district. In the 28th of October 1951 "Arnas" was captured in Girkalnis forest by the Soviets. Unfortunately alive, because of special drugs that were used against him. After "traditional" communist tortures Juozas Kumpis - "Arnas" was shot dead in 13th of August 1952, in the famous Russian prison of Butyrki in Moscow. His final resting place is still unknown for Lithuanians, but probably well known for Putins' colleagues from KGB.
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Post by Lit. » 05 Feb 2005 16:54

Here are 2 pictures from the private collection of veteran of Soviet-Lithuanian war Leonas Laurinskas - "Liutas" ("The Lion"), where "Liutas" himself is documented.

I remember this brave man when he brought and proudly raised our Lithuanian national flag to some public meeting in the occupied Lithuania, when this flag was still prohibited by the Russian occupants in the 1987.
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Post by Lit. » 21 Feb 2005 08:49

Lithuanian partisans: Kazimieras Alisauskas - "Spartakas" and Vanda Jocyte - "Ramune" (picture from R.Kaunietis collection).

Kazimieras Alisauskas - "Spartakas" was born in 1911, in Juknoniai village, Zemaitkiemis distr., Ukmerge region. He was commander of the 1st battalion of "Plienas" ("Steel") brigade, "Didzioji Kova" (The Great Fight") military district. His Battalion was fighting in the regions of Zemaitkiemis, Pabaiskas, Sesuoliai. "Spartakas" was KIA in 28th of March, 1949, in Uzupenai village, Sesuoliai distr., Ukmerge region.
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Post by patrynius » 21 Feb 2005 16:33

Hi
That's great infos (I'm still reading that hole topic :) ) but can you say smtg more about Lithuans uprising in 1941 againsts soviet? I have never heard about that level of fights (4000 dead!! )
regards

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Post by Liluh » 21 Feb 2005 21:05

OMG! 8O

This is unbelivable. I always knew about the Lithuanian grudge for Soviets, but I always thought it was from the very same reasons as Poles had. I had absolutelly no idea about the Lithuanian uprising and that combat clashes kept going till 50`s (or maybe longer? If so, let me know). I was quite happy about having some deeper knowledge about all our neighbours history, and now you post this one, and I`m totally ashamed!

I really had no idea! Gimme more.

I`d like to know when was the last battle/clash between FF`s and NKVD (nevermind the event of tv-station in 90`s, I mean just partisants), what were the resistant members actions. Was it similiar to polish AK during WWII? Sabotage, blowing up bridges and rail tracks, espionage, ambushes, executions of hq members or traitors etc.? Did Soviets (be honest) use the help of Lithuanian communists? Did Lithuanian FF fought against his own kin? Did they posses any kind of vehicles? Did they control (and if so, for how long and what/where) some part of terrain or area of land where they could create 'little independence', and where oppressor could not enter without major offensive effort? Do you know anything about possible cooperation with resistant groups in other countries oppressed by SU in the region?

I`ve got so many questions. I just learned something I didn`t think it ever existed, even though I paid a visit to Vilnius last year :P

Great thread! Although it driffted off the original topic a little bit ;)

If anyone has some info about similiar groups in other countries of the region, I`d appriciate if you could post it :)

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Post by Liluh » 21 Feb 2005 21:08

Ah, one more thing! I can`t restrain myself from thinking about the hair styles of those people. Also, facialhair styles. Long hair, long beards seem common. Any particular reason for that? This reminds me of some (paradox) commie fighters in Latin America. Type of anarchic nonconformists.

And no offense intended, of course.

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Post by Lit. » 23 Feb 2005 12:57

Liluh wrote:Ah, one more thing! I can`t restrain myself from thinking about the hair styles of those people. Also, facial hair styles. Long hair, long beards seem common. Any particular reason for that? This reminds me of some (paradox) commie fighters in Latin America. Type of anarchic nonconformists.


Too many questions :) But I have chosen the easiest one, at least for me. The hair styles of partisans. There are complex of reasons. I don't know which one was the main.

One of the main could be this:

... while living on the very edge (without LSD or other drugs), they really first caught the wind of Freedom, that have came to Free World a bit later in late 60-ties. One of the main signs of it was long hair, as form of protest to the surrounding society and image of free men... So they were the very first hippies for sure! And they set us free!
http://members.fortunecity.com/heavy_me ... isans.html


I remember the time when Soviet militia and KGB were hunting for young men with long hair in the streets of occupied Lithuania. Usually they were cut till bold head by force. KGB were extremely angry on those modern Lithuanian hippies, because they considered it as direct followers of the style of Lithuanian partisans, which was called "bandits" by them.

Other reason for long hair style of partisans could be for security. At the 2nd and 3rd stages of Freedom War in Lithuania, MVD-KGB used fake "partisans" (more about major A.Sokolovs' killing squads: viewtopic.php?p=622126#622126 ), but those pretenders were not able to have a long hair, because it takes a time - first, and second - those pretenders would be uncovered by informers of partisans when freely walking in the streets with such hair styles.

The 3rd possible reason could be the possibility for some partisans to visit their home farms and families in the daylight, using women clothing. Soviet spies and informers from neighborhood were looking for men, and pay less attention to some unknown "woman".

But I'm pretty sure, that the first reason was the main. There was even fashion among partisans to express personal freedom in such way. Here is the pioneers of "The Led Zeppelin": :) Image

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