Ask the "Naeder steering system" used in B1 tank.

Discussions on the equipment used by the Axis forces, apart from the things covered in the other sections. Hosted by Juha Tompuri
zhongguoren
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Ask the "Naeder steering system" used in B1 tank.

Post by zhongguoren » 26 May 2005 02:46

From our forum I got a lot of knowledge about the B1 tank and its details. In some articles I always find the words about the "Naeder steering system",but I can't understand why this kind of system is advanced than the similar system used in the German tanks (like III,IV,and tiger).
I want to know:
1,This system is first used in which kind of tank or vehicle and who invented this system?
2,During the wwii,except the B1,is any other tanks or AFVs used this steering system?
3,I also need some more information related to the mechanics of this system.
Thanks!! :D

Gothard
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Post by Gothard » 26 May 2005 03:19

http://www.chars-francais.net/index_a.htm

Heres the ultimate website on french armour with a full description and all the technical drawings as well as a list of EVERY KNOWN B1 listed by name with photos and histories.

Gothard
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Post by Gothard » 26 May 2005 03:41

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/did.panzer/LesGBC-FR.htm

all units armed with chars and locations

Gothard
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Post by Gothard » 26 May 2005 04:24

It was steered through a double differential combined with the Naeder (a hydrostatic unit). The driver used the Naeder steering system to line up the gun as it couldn't move left or right. It ran on a Holt suspension which was covered by skirting. The suspension was leaf and coil springs on vertical articulations. The tracks were driven by the rear sprocket and could be adjusted from the inside. Had APX1 turret.


What is a hydrostatic transmission?
A hydrostatic transmission consists of a variable-displacement pump and a fixed or variable displacement motor, operating together in a closed circuit. In a closed circuit, fluid from the motor outlet flows directly to the pump inlet, without returning to the tank.

As well as being variable, the output of the transmission pump can be reversed, so that both the direction and speed of motor rotation are controlled from within the pump. This eliminates the need for directional and flow (speed) control valves in the circuit.

Because the pump and motor leak internally, which allows fluid to escape from the loop and drain back to the tank, a fixed-displacement pump called a charge pump is used to ensure that the loop remains full of fluid during normal operation. The charge pump is normally installed on the back of the transmission pump and has an output of at least 20% of the transmission pump's output.

In practice, the charge pump not only keeps the loop full of fluid, it pressurizes the loop to between 110 and 360 PSI, depending on the transmission manufacturer. A simple charge pressure circuit comprises the charge pump, a relief valve and two check valves, through which the charge pump can replenish the transmission loop. Once the loop is charged to the pressure setting of the relief valve, the flow from the charge pump passes over the relief valve, through the case of the pump or motor or both, and back to tank.

Gothard
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Post by Gothard » 26 May 2005 04:58

basically its a hydraulic transmission like you see on modern skidloaders. the technology was new at the time and the system was buggy. The Transmission was developed by Schneider Corporation - the company that made the first french tank. At the time they part of the Somua Corporation. Naeder wouldve been the designer. Hydrostatic technology had been around since the early 1900's but it wasnt until the advent of the farm tractor in 1920 and the need for a simplified, low maintenance steering system for tracked vehicles that it was really used. the system was a closed loop. opening one side meant that the other side locked up.

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