The official AHF Equipment of Allies & Neutrals quiz

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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 02 May 2006 13:48

US Heavy Tank T34

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BIGpanzer
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Post by BIGpanzer » 02 May 2006 17:07

Not exactly T34 (as it was armed with 120mm gun), but I accept your answer nevertheless.

That was experimental US heavy tank T29E3 with 105mm gun, developed in early 1945 as the US answer to German Tiger II and Soviet IS-3.
T29E1, T29E2 and T29E3 had differ engines and some differences in turret and gun. Driving was done by using a joystick as on an airplane. The transmission was GM CD-850-1 which provided steering, braking, and variable power flow to each track.
T29: pilot models were ordered in 1944 and were finished in early 1945. Production was authorized, but the Army Ground Forces didn't want such a large tank, 6 were built till 1947.
T30 (106 t with 155mm gun): designed at same time as the T29. Pilot models started constructing in April 1945 and were delivered in 1947. The loader was helped by a powered rammer.
T32: was based on the M26, but with more thick armor, 4 pilot models were made in 1945 and 1946. Counterweight added to rear of turret, the hull front was welded.

Specifications of T29/T32/T34: 53-70.5 t; 11.57x3.5-3.8x2.8-3.2 m; 105mm gun (T29) or 90mm gun (T32) or 120 mm gun (T34) + 3-5 MGs; up to 203mm armor; 650 hp engine Ford V12 GAC or Allison V12; 32 km/h; 6 men crew.

The photo of T29E3 above was from Patton museum.
http://naritafamily.com/Scalemodel/refe ... on_419.jpg

http://mailer.fsu.edu/~akirk/tanks/Unit ... -T29-b.jpg

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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 03 May 2006 00:50

I thought it was the T29 but wasn't able to find any pictures of the version with the rangefinder across the turret. The T34 however did have the rangefinder and so I plumbed for that. I recognised the turret bustle though, as a distinctive shape, unique to that late war series of US heavies.

OK, what is this?

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BIGpanzer
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Post by BIGpanzer » 03 May 2006 01:01

Sherman BARV (postWWII name - "Sea Lion") - British tank rescue/evacuation vehicle for the Normandy invasion. 52 were used in Normandy (66 were built), they had water-proof superstructure and diver on board, also those AFVs were equipped with pomp and winch (the last one was not reliable, nevertheless).

http://www.rangerover.f9.co.uk/REME/A/E01.JPG
http://www.2iemeguerre.com/blindes/images/barv2.jpg

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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 03 May 2006 03:52

Sorry, nope, that is not the correct answer. Any other other takers?

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edward_n_kelly
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Post by edward_n_kelly » 03 May 2006 04:57

Beach Armoured Recovery Vehicle (AUST) No.1 Mark 1

from The US M3 Medium Series
in Australia by Paul D. Handel Part Two - Variants
Beach Armoured Recovery Vehicle

Successful amphibious assaults on the British beaches during the Normandy invasion in Europe in June 1944 was contributed to by the efficient Beach Landing Parties and Recovery organization which existed. The Beach Armoured Recovery Vehicle (BARV) had been developed by the REME on an M4A2 Sherman hull, and figured prominently in beach clearance during the Normandy landings. Some 52 vehicles had been produced by D-Day. The vehicle was designed to wade to the top of the coaming around the vehicle superstructure, and could either tow tanks off the beach, or using its nose plate push off landing craft that had become stranded.

Authority was given in June 1949 for the Army Design Establishment to produce a conversion for the Grant tank into a BARV for training purposes. The turret and hull upper front and top were removed from an M3A5 (ARN 23893) and a wooden mock up superstructure was built. In early 1950, the go-ahead was given for the completion of the vehicle, and so the superstructure was rebuilt using ¼ inch mild steel plate. The superstructure was built generally along the lines of the British Sherman BARV, although a front upper hull following the Sherman's lines was constructed, obviously to allow the maximum use to be made of the British design. Two direct vision glass blocks were incorporated in the front of the superstructure. The rear of the superstructure, unlike that of the Sherman BARV, was flat.

Like all Grants serving with the Australian Army post war, it was fitted with the M4 Sherman suspension units.

The modification allowed the BARV to operate in six feet of water with a three foot surf running. There was no winch fitted, the vehicle relying instead on tow ropes to move any drowned tanks. To allow connection of the tow ropes underwater, at least one crew member was trained as a shallow water diver. The front pusher plate mounted several railway sleepers and was designed to push landing craft off the beach if they became stranded.

The conversion was introduced into service as the Beach Armoured Recovery Vehicle (AUST) No.1 Mark 1. Only one vehicle was so converted. Issued to the Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers Training Centre at Bandiana (RTC), Victoria, it did sterling work on courses and as a recovery training aid until 1970, when it was presented by RTC to the Armoured Centre, Puckapunyal to display in their then newly formed Museum. The Grant BARV still exists today in the collection of the RAAC Memorial and Army Tank Museum.
Edward

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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 03 May 2006 06:54

Correct! Well done, Ned! Bit of a tricky one that one. It looks superficially like a Sherman BARV but its actually a Grant. They constructed a completely new hull, shaped like a Sherman's.

Over to you.

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Virgil Hiltz
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Post by Virgil Hiltz » 03 May 2006 11:51

The riveting on the side is the clue to it being a former Grant/Lee type.
Last edited by Virgil Hiltz on 03 May 2006 13:21, edited 1 time in total.

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BIGpanzer
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Post by BIGpanzer » 03 May 2006 12:19

I noted the superstructure only :lol:

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David W
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Post by David W » 03 May 2006 12:46

I thought only the Lee had that riveting, not the Grant?

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edward_n_kelly
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Post by edward_n_kelly » 03 May 2006 13:00

I will have to pass - insufficent time until I go on holiday.....

Edward

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David W
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Post by David W » 03 May 2006 13:03

It's not important.

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edward_n_kelly
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Post by edward_n_kelly » 03 May 2006 13:39

Back again - just a quick one - can you identify this sad specimen ?

Edward
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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 03 May 2006 14:43

According to Chamberlain and Ellis's "British and American Tanks of World War II" it is a "Mine Destroyer and Demolition Vehicle. M4a4 fitted with Spigot Mortar Attachment."

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edward_n_kelly
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Post by edward_n_kelly » 04 May 2006 01:31

Yes - too quick me thinks....

To you Brian

Edward

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