The Sino-Japanese War(Campaigns in detail)

Discussions on all aspects of China, from the beginning of the First Sino-Japanese War till the end of the Chinese Civil War. Hosted by YC Chen.
User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

notes from campaign account

Post by asiaticus » 09 May 2006 07:18

Map (above ) and notes from campaign account from: Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Pg. 300-303.


According to Hsu Long-hsuen, the the various Chinese War areas supported the Offensive to retake Nanchang by offensives to tie down Japanese troops. 5th War area in particular attacked the Southern sector of the Peiking-Hankow RR from the east and west.

5th War areas 21st Army Group under Liao Lei operated as guerrillas from a base in the Honan, Hupei, Anhui border area east of the Peiking-Hankow RR.

North and West of Wuhan the 5th War area had its front under the command of Li Tsung-jen. It ran from the north bank of the Yangtze across from Yuehyang up to the mouth of the Han River and up the west bank of the Han and Xiang River to Chunghsiang then northwest south of Chingshihchiao into the Tahung Mountains then to Huochiatian via chehotien then north to the Tungpo Mountains. North of the Tungpo range the 68th Corps of the 1st War area kept the Japanese forces on the railroad at Hsinyang under obsevation.

The 5th War area at the end of April detected the buildup of Japanese forces for an offensive. 16th Division massed at Chung-hsiang, Yang-tze Chen and Tung-chiao Chen, 13th Division at Anlu, the main force of 3rd Division at Ying-shan and north of Hsi-ho Chen, and the balance of 3rd Division at Hsin-yang. 4th Cavalry Brigade was massed in the area north and south of the Hankow-Ichang Highway.

DISPOSITIONS AND PLANS
To meet this threat 5th War Area halted their offensive operations and began to redeploy to counter it.

River Defense Force under Kuo Chan was deployed to defend the southern part of the Han River from Shayang to the Yantze and the north bank of the Yangtze from the Han River to Sha-shih and Icheng, including a garrison at Ching-men northeast of Icheng.

North of Shayang the west bank of the Xiang River to Chunghsiang then northwest to the Tahung Mountains was held by a the Right Flank Force commanded by Chang Tze-chung, composed of the 33rd Army Group and 29th Army Group.

The Left Flank Force composed of the 11th Army Group held the line from the Tahung Mountains (39th Corps) aross the plain to Huochiatien then north to the Tungpo Mountains(84th Corps).

68th Corps holding the area north of the Tungpo Mountains was attached to 2nd Army which kept its 30th Corps in reserve.

31st Army Group under Tang En-po backed up 11th Army Group with the 13th Corps in the area of Tienho, Kao-cheng, Tienwangtien. 85th Corps was held further west near the Tungpo mountains at Wu-shan Chen and Lu-tou Chen as a reserve.

22nd Army was also kept as a mobile reserve between Changkangtien and Tsao-yang.

Li Tsung-jen planed to use the mountains as strongpoints to hold the enemy up with positions in depth awaiting some of the enemy force to enter the Sui-Tsao Basin and then shift to a concentric attack to cut them off and destroy them.

JAPANESE OFFENSIVE

On 30th of April the Japanese 3rd Divisin attacked the 84th Corps at Hao-chia-tien and Hsu-chia-tien. After a days fighting they 84th Corps fell back westward to positions near Ta-erh-wan. On May 2, the Japanese attacked 13th Corps at Kao-cheng but was halted but attacks at Ta-erh-wan continued for four days, involving poison gas, which caused heavy casualties among the Chinese. After abandonng Ta-erh-wan and Kao-cheng the two corps fell back behind the Pi-ao River. On May 5th the Japanese attacked Tien-ho-kou but has halted by 13th Corps. On May 6th there was bitter fighting along the Lishan Chian-chia-ho line but the Japanese did not advance.

Meanwile to the south on 33rd Army Groups front the Japanese concentratd 16th and 13th Divisions and 4th Cavarlry Brigade and fell on the positions of the 37th and 180th Divisions at Chang-kung-miao and Lou-tse-miao. Heavy fighting lasted 4 days, when Japanese forces penatrated to Liu=shui-kou contacting elements of the 38th Division. By the 7th of May the Japanese force had pushed north and captured Tsao-yang deep in the Chinese rear area. Racing north they captured Hu-yang Chen and Hsin-yeh on the 10th and Tang-ho and Nan-yang on May 12.

Additionally the 29th Brigade/3rd Division had advanced from Hsinyang and captured Tungpo on May 12. Thus the Chinese forces in the Tungpo Mountain region were surrounded on three sides. 13th Corps stayed to hold the Tungpo Mountains while the remaining troops fell back to the north. Also 39th Corps was isolated in the Tahung Mountains.

CHINESE COUNTEROFFENSIVE

Li Tsung-jen now ordered the 33rd Army Group and 39th Corps to cut the enemy rear between the Xiang River and Tahung Mountains. 2nd Army was to attack from Hsinchi and Paoanchai against Tangho and Nanyang. In the face of these converging attacks the Japanese began to retreat to the east suffering heavy casualties and losing succesively Hsin-yeh, Nan-yang, Tang-ho, Tsao-yang, and Tung-po. By May 20th the original frontlines were restored.

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

Sui - Tsaoyang Campaign topo map

Post by asiaticus » 09 May 2006 07:32

Here is an Expedia topo map of the larger Sui - Tsaoyang Campaign area.


This site makes even more detailed maps of an area but they are smaller areas. Go to:

http://www.expedia.com/pub/agent.dll

Select maps:

Place name: Suixian [Suizhou], Hubei, China
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

15th Division in Sui - Tsaoyang Campaign?

Post by asiaticus » 11 May 2006 03:21

15th Division and 4th Cavalry were directly under Central China Expeditionary Force command at this time and apparently at least the cavalry were attached to 11th Army for this operation.

15th Division appears 6 months later as garrisoning the area around Nanking in Map 19 Winter 1939-40 Operations of the Chinese from Hsu Long-hsuen's History of The Sino-Japanese War. I have no confirmation of the claim in http://www.uglychinese.org/war.htm#Ichigo that the 15th was involved in any way in Sui - Tsaoyang Campaign.

User avatar
Akira Takizawa
Member
Posts: 2773
Joined: 26 Feb 2006 17:37
Location: Japan

Post by Akira Takizawa » 11 May 2006 09:06

In Japan, it is called 襄東会戦 (Battle of East Xiangfan). 3rd, 13th and 16th Divisions and the cavalry group (4th Cavarly Brigade) participated in it (15th Division did not participate). I upload the map of 襄東会戦.

Taki
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

Re: Battle of East Xiangfan map

Post by asiaticus » 11 May 2006 14:27

Thanks for the map. It makes more sense of the Japanese movements than the one from Hsu Long-hsuen's book.

One thing I cant make out from the accounts and maps I have seen is the route(s?) the Japanese troops used to make their withdrawal.

I am curious as to what the Japanese doing to secure their flanks and line of advance. Or was that the problem that forced the withdrawal?

User avatar
Akira Takizawa
Member
Posts: 2773
Joined: 26 Feb 2006 17:37
Location: Japan

Re: Battle of East Xiangfan map

Post by Akira Takizawa » 12 May 2006 07:27

asiaticus wrote:One thing I cant make out from the accounts and maps I have seen is the route(s?) the Japanese troops used to make their withdrawal.

I am curious as to what the Japanese doing to secure their flanks and line of advance. Or was that the problem that forced the withdrawal?


They are not withdrawal, but return to mop up the remnants of enemy troops.


Taki

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

discrepancy between the Chinese and Japanese story?

Post by asiaticus » 12 May 2006 09:15

They are not withdrawal, but return to mop up the remnants of enemy troops.



Sounds like a discrepancy between the Chinese and Japanese story of this campaign. What is the Japanese version, with the mopping up then?

I am particularly interested in what the reason was that the Japanese had to pull back to their start line to "mop up" once they had taken all that real estate. They had not relinquished captured land like that before in a campaign. Was it too much to hold with the forces on hand given all the Chinese forces around them? Or is that part of the Chinese account (or any other ) in dispute?

User avatar
Akira Takizawa
Member
Posts: 2773
Joined: 26 Feb 2006 17:37
Location: Japan

Re: discrepancy between the Chinese and Japanese story?

Post by Akira Takizawa » 12 May 2006 16:09

> Sounds like a discrepancy between the Chinese and Japanese story of this campaign. What is the Japanese version, with the mopping up then?

This is the Japanese story.

As main Chinese forces were destroyed until May 12th, 11th Army ordered its divisions to return south to mop up enemy troops routed at the north of 大洪山. The 3rd Division went down to 洛陽店 and mopped up there. The 13th Division mopped up 大洪山, but many Chinese escaped into the deep mountain. The 16th Division mopped up down to 長寿店. The cavalry mopped up the east bank of Han River. The mop-up operation ended until May 20th and the Japanese changed to the defensive status.

> I am particularly interested in what the reason was that the Japanese had to pull back to their start line to "mop up" once they had taken all that real estate. They had not relinquished captured land like that before in a campaign. Was it too much to hold with the forces on hand given all the Chinese forces around them? Or is that part of the Chinese account (or any other ) in dispute?

The purpose of this battle was not to get estate, but to destroy enemy forces. The Japanese first destroyed enemy main forces, then they returned to destroy remaining enemy small forces. The Japanese insisted that they destoyed 20 Chinese divisions through this battle.


Taki
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

Re: discrepancy between the Chinese and Japanese story?

Post by asiaticus » 12 May 2006 20:05

Given the discrepancy on that last part of the campaign, I am wondering if the initial offensive story is different too.

User avatar
tigre
Member
Posts: 7515
Joined: 20 Mar 2005 11:48
Location: Argentina

Changsha

Post by tigre » 14 May 2006 21:24

Hello folks here I go again; this time I've got something about Changsha.

The European war has overshadowed the headlines of the great contfict in the Far East which for over two years had held the world’s focus of attention.
No large-scale operations nor spectacular victories have taken place in China for several months. In fact, except for the mopping-up campaign of occupied territory and some guerrilla activities, it might be concluded that the undeclared war between China and Japan has virtually come to an end. Even the horder clashes between Japan and Russia have reached a Minimum.

Over a year ago, the Japanese captured Canton in South China and Hankow in Central China, cutting off Chiang Kaishek from those supplies from overseas that were essential to Chinese resistance. Then further efforts to hold him at bay were practically abandoned.

During the last twelve months, Japanese advances on their long front have been inconsequential and halfhearted; they have made no serious attempt to open rail connections between Peiping and Hankow or between Hankow and Canton, but have left the Chinese in possession of the middle section of hoth fines.

Observers in China believe that large scale offensives may have been abandoned for any one of several reasons. The Japanese Amy may have exhausted its strikhg power and become less effective in more difficult terrain which now has deprived the invader of his mechanical superiority and the resistance of warships which no longer can advance through the treaclierous rapids of the Upper Yangtze. On the other hand, the Chinese are favored by the mountains of the West and Southwest which halted the advance of tbe invader’s mechanized units.

On 29 March 1939, the Japanese made a swift surprise attack against tbe Chinese defenders of Nanchang and took possession of the capital of Kiangsi Province, keypoint on the Chekiang-Hunan railway, which had been a major air base in Central China since the beginning of the war. This was the last operation of any importance.

A few days after the Japanese-Russian truce of September 1939 ended hostilities along the Manchukuoan frontier, Japan’s Army in China launched an offensive. against Changsha, capital of Hunan Province. The city itself is no prize, for what remained after panicky-fleeing Chinese set fire to it in November of last year, has been further devastated by Japanese bombers. But Changsha would serve as a stepping-stone to China’s southernmost provinces, which we the last open doors to the Western World. If and when the Japanese control these provinces they will possess practicaly all of China.

The fall of Changsha was predicted. Instead of a victory, however, the Japanese suffered a reverse which, according to reports, surpasses in importance and scale the Chinese success of May 1938 at Taierschwang. On 28 September 1939, the Japanese captured Pingkiang and advanced to within fifteen miles of Changsha. The Chinese forces had destroyed all roads and railways in the vicinity of Changsha, stationing strong columns in the hills east of the Canton-Hankow railway. In addition, a powerful Chinese force was concentrated to the north of Pingkiang for the purpose of cutting off the Canton-Hankow railway in the rear of the Japanese forces which were advancing toward Changsha after the capture of Pingkiang.

The Chinese troops holding the lines near Tungking Lake withdrew and concentrated on the hills flanking the railway and highways. The main body of the Japanese troops was trapped in the mountains, and was forced to abandon its drive on Changsha and had to fight its way north across the Mi river to escape annihilation. Thus, the recent offensive in Hunan Province collapsed.

This victory was widely celebrated in Chungking and other Cities of unoccupied China when, by coincidence, the celebration
of the twenty-eighth anniversary of the Chinese Repubfic was taking place. This was a typical Chinese reaction, and observers believe that it would have been far more profitable for the Chinese to press these advantages than to celebrate the victory.

Last September, the flood accomplished for the Chinese what the guerrillas had been attempting in vain for some time when vast areas in North China were flooded. The railroad between Tientsin and Tangka was severed, a considerable amount of Japanese equipment was carried away and, consequently, the pacification and organization of the occupied area suffered a severe set back.

Source: Military News Around the World - Dec 1939.

Regards. Tigre.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Akira Takizawa
Member
Posts: 2773
Joined: 26 Feb 2006 17:37
Location: Japan

Operation Kansho

Post by Akira Takizawa » 15 May 2006 07:38

In Japan, it is called Operation 贛湘(贛(kan)=Chianghsi, 湘(sho)=Hunan). 6th, 33th and 106th Divisions and detachments of 3rd and 13th Divisions participated in it. The purpose of the operation was to annihilate Chinese forces and not to occupy Changsha. Japanese insisted that they inflicted a heavy loss upon the Chinese and had archieved the purpose of the operaton.


Taki
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

OOB: First Changsha Campaign

Post by asiaticus » 15 May 2006 20:01

Here is what I have to the oob for the First Changsha Campaign (Early Aug. - Early Oct. 1939)



Japan (Early September 1939) [1,2]

11th Army - Neiji Okamura[1]s/b Yasuji Okamura [3]
- 6th Division - Lt. Gen. Shiro Inaba[1] [3]
--9th Infantry Brigade
---11th Infantry Regiment
---41st Infantry Regiment
--21st Infantry Brigade
---21st Infantry Regiment
---42nd Infantry Regiment
--5th Mountain Artillery Regiment
--5th Cavalry Regiment
--5th Engineer Regiment
--5th Transport Regiment

- 106th Division - Lt. Gen. Ryotaro Nakai[1,3]
--111th Infantry Brigade
---113th Infantry Regiment
---147th Infantry Regiment
--136th Infantry Brigade
---125th Infantry Regiment
---145th Infantry Regiment
--106th Field Artillery Regiment
--106th Cavalry Regiment
--106th Engineer Regiment
--106th Transport Regiment

- 33rd Division - Jutaro Amagkasu[1} s/b Lt. Gen. Shigetaro Amakasu[3]
-- 33rd infantry Brigade Group:
--- 213th Infantry regiment
--- 214th Infantry regiment
--- 215th Infantry regiment
-- 33rd recon regiment
-- 33rd mountain artillery regiment
-- 33rd military engineer regiment
-- 33rd transport regiment

A portion of 13th Division - Seiji Tanaka[1} s/b Gen. Shizuichi Tanaka[3]
- Nara Column [1], - Cdr: ? Nara
--- 26th Infantry Brigade
---- 58th Infantry Regiment
---- 116th Infantry Regiment
Presumably with elements of:
--- 19th Mountain Artilley Regiment
--- 17th Cavalry Regiment
--- 13th Engineer Regiment
--- 13th Transport Regiment

A portion of 3rd Division - Lt. Gen. Shinichi Fujita[1,3]
- Uemura Column[1] - Cdr: ? Uemura
--29th Infantry Brigade -
--- 18th Infantry Regiment
--- 34th Infantry Regiment
Presumably with elements of:
-- 3rd Field Artillery Regiment
-- 3rd Cavalry Regiment
-- 3rd Engineer Regiment
-- 3rd Transport Regiment

- 101st Division - Yaheta Saito[1], s/b Lt. Gen. Masatoshi Saito[3]
---101st Infantry Brigade
----101st Infantry Regiment
----149th Infantry Regiment
---102nd Infantry Brigade
----103rd Infantry Regiment
----157th Infantry Regiment
---101st Field Artillery Regiment
---101st Cavalry Regiment
---101st Engineer Regiment
---101st Transport Regiment

Naval Forces:
- "Scores of Ships and more than 100 motor boats." [1]
This involved an opposed landing at the mouth of the Mi-lo River on the Hsiang River "enemy marines, elements of 3rd Division (Uemura Column /29th Bde), scores of ships and more than a 100 motor boats. Troops are identified on map 17 as the Muragami Column). [1]

Notes:
- Presumably IJN vessels were from China Area Fleet.


China (Early September 1939)

9th War Area - Chen Cheng
- 19th Army Group - Lo Cho-ying
-- 32nd Corps - Sun Ken-tang
--- 139th Division - Li Chao-ying
--- 141st Division - Tang Yung-hang
-- 49th Corps - Liu Tuo-chuan
--- 105th Division - Wang Tieh-han
--- 9th Reserve Division - Chang Yen-chuan
- 1st Army Group - Lu Han
-- 58th Corps - Sun Tu
--- New 10th Division - Liu Cheng-fu
--- New 11th Division - Lu Tao-yuan
-- 60th Corps - An En-pu
--- 183rd Division - Li Chao-ying
--- 184th Division - Wan Pao-pang
-- 2nd Advance Column - ?
--- 6th Kiangsi Preservation Regiment
- 30th Army Group - Wang Ling-chi
-- 78th Corps - Hsia Shou-hsun
--- New 13th Division - Liu Juo-pi
--- New 16th Division - Wu Shao-chuan
-- 72nd Corps - Han Chuan-pu
--- New 14th Division - Chen Liang-chi
--- New 15th Division - Fu-yi
-- Hupei Hunan Border Area Advance Force - Fan Sung-pu
--- 8th Corps - Li Yu-tang
---- 3rd Division - Chao His-tien
---- 197th Division - Ting Ping-chun
--- 3rd Advance Column - Chung Shih-pan
---- 4th Kiangsi Preservation Regiment - Cheng Chih-ching
---- 5th Kiangsi Preservation Regiment - Chung Shih-pan
---- 9th Kiangsi Preservation Regiment - Hsu Pu-chih
--- 1st Advance Column - Kung Ho-chung
--- Hupei Peace Preservation Regiment - Pi Tsung-yung
- 27th Army Group - Yang Sen
-- 20th Corps - Yang Han-yu
--- 133rd Division - Li Chao-ying
--- 134th Division - Yang Kan-tsai
- 15th Army - Kuan Lin-cheng [actiing]
-- 52nd Corps - Chang Yao-ming
--- 2nd Division - Chao Kung-wa
--- 25th Division - Chang Han-chu
--- 195th Division - Chin Yi-chih
-- 37th Corps - Chen Pei
--- 60th Division - Liang Chung-chiang
--- 95th Division - Lo Chi
-- 79th Corps - Hsia Chu-chung
--- 98th Division - Wang Chia-pen
--- 82nd Division - Lo Chi-chiang
--- 140th Division - Li Tang
- 20th Army Group - Shang Chen , Dep:Huo Kuei-chang
-- Tung-ting Garrison - Huo Kuei-chang
--- 53rd Corps - Chou Fu-cheng
---- 116th Division - Chao Sao-tsung *
---- 130th Division - Chu Hung-hsun *
--- 54th Corps - Chen Lieh
---- 14th Division - Chueh Han-chien
---- 50th Division - Chang Chun *
---- 23rd Division - Sheng Feng-yao
-- 87th Corps - Chou Hsiang-chu
--- 43rd Division - Chin Teh-yang
--- 198th Division - Wang Yu-ying
- 73rd Corps - Peng Wei-jen
-- 15th Division - Wang Chih-pin
-- 77th Division - Liu Chi-ming
- 4th Corps - Ou Chen
-- 59th Division - Chang The-neng
-- 90th Division - Chen Yung-chi
-- 102nd Division - Po Hui-chang
- 70th Corps - Li Chueh
-- 90th Division - Tang Po-yin
-- 107th Division - Tuan Heng *
- New 6th Corps - Chen Chiu-cheng
-- 5th Division - Tai Chi-tao *
-- 6th Division - Lung Yun-fei *
- 74th Corps - Wang Yao-wu
-- 51st Division - Li Tien-hsia
-- 57th Division - Shih Chung-cheng
-- 58th Division - Chen Shih
- 5th Corps - Tu Yu-ming
-- 1st Honor Division - Cheng Tung-kao
-- 200th Division - Tai An-lan *
-- New 12th Division- Chiu Ching-chuan
- 99 Corps - Fu Chang-fang
-- 92nd Division - Liang Han-ming *
-- 76th Division - Wang Ling-yun *
- 11th Division - Yey Pei-kao

* Uncommitted

Sources:
[1] Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung , Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.

[2] IJA in China orbat, 1937 to 1945

http://www.china-defense.com/forum/show ... php?t=1168


[3] Generals from Japan (WWII)

http://www.generals.dk/nation/Japan/S.html


-----------------

Would be interesting to know more about what the Japanese Naval landing force was and its supporting ships.

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

Changsha Campaign 1939 map

Post by asiaticus » 15 May 2006 20:07

Here is a map of the 1st Changsha Campaign from Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Akira Takizawa
Member
Posts: 2773
Joined: 26 Feb 2006 17:37
Location: Japan

Post by Akira Takizawa » 16 May 2006 01:56

Nara Detachment - Major Gen. Akira Nara
Kamimura Detachment - Major Gen. Mikio Kamimura
Naval Units - A part of Shanghai SNLF, 11th Sentai, 13th Gunboat Unit, 4th Guard Unit

Taki

User avatar
asiaticus
Member
Posts: 923
Joined: 03 Mar 2004 04:53
Location: Lake Elsinore CA USA

Re: Columns, Naval units and East Xiangfan and Kansho maps

Post by asiaticus » 16 May 2006 21:10

Taki

Thanks for the info on the Japanese columns and the naval units. I take it Kamimura Detachment - Major Gen. Mikio Kamimura is the correct ID for Uemura Column? What is the source on these unit IDs?

Also was wondering what the source of those great maps of the Battle of East Xiangfan and Operation Kansho?

I notice that the Battle of East Xiangfan map shows the Chinese 2nd Army Group / 30th Corps with different divisions under the Hsu Long-hsuen oob which has:
--- 27th Division -
--- 44th Sep. Bde. -

Whereas the map has the 30th and 31st Divisions listed. It is the only big ommision / discrepancy in units between the lists I can see.

I wonder if they were there initially with 30th Corps and the 27th Div. and 44th Sep. Bde were assigned later when the Chinese began their follow up/counterattack of the Japanese retirement. Was wondering if 30th Corps was attacked by the Japenese there at Nanyang severly enough to have rendered them combat ineffective for a while, requiring their replacement?

Return to “China at War 1895-1949”